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Best hybrid cars arriving in 2024

Meet the new hybrids which will land in Australia in 2024.

We might be in the midst of an EV revolution in Australia, but the humble hybrid still does a lot of the heavy lifting on the sales charts offering the convenience of refuelling with trimmed-down bills and, in the case of a plug-in, the opportunity for zero-emissions motoring.

Hybrids with and without a plug continue to surge up the sales charts, and there are more particularly promising models in the works for 2024, covering multiple categories.

Let’s take a look at what’s due to arrive and when, so you can set your calendar to the model which looks most appealing.

01. Toyota C-HR - H1

Offered with the choice of either a 1.8-litre in front-wheel-drive configuration for the GXL and Koba variants, or a 2.0-litre all-wheel-drive configuration for the GR-Sport, the C-HR is due to arrive early in 2024.

The Toyota C-HR at long last will move to its second-generation, and this time around it’s hybrid only.

Offered with the choice of either a 1.8-litre in front-wheel-drive configuration for the GXL and Koba variants, or a 2.0-litre all-wheel-drive configuration for the GR-Sport, the C-HR is due to arrive early in 2024.

Aside from the new styling, which matches it up with the not-for-Australia Prius, the C-HR also gets an interior overhaul with extended use of recycled materials and a larger 12.3-inch multimedia touchscreen.

Read more about Toyota C-HR:

Toyota C-HR

Toyota C-HR
3.8
From
$42,990
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

02. Lexus LBX - H1

The LBX will share its 1.5-litre three-cylinder hybrid drivetrain with the Yaris Cross (producing 85kW/141Nm) which sips just 3.8 litres of fuel per 100km.

The LBX will be the smallest-ever Lexus when it arrives early in 2024, using underpinnings from the Toyota Yaris Cross but with a far more luxurious spin - and don’t worry - Lexus promises the architecture has been tweaked “to meet the stringent requirements of a Lexus vehicle”.

Regardless, the LBX will share its 1.5-litre three-cylinder hybrid drivetrain with the Yaris Cross (producing 85kW/141Nm) which sips just 3.8 litres of fuel per 100km. It is expected to be available in both front- and all-wheel drive, exclusively as a hybrid.

It is also expected to be the most affordable Lexus product ever, below the UX which can be had from $46,085 before on-roads.

03. Jeep Compass 4xe - H1

Set to arrive in the first half of 2024, the Compass 4xe pairs a 1.3-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine with an electric motor for a 179kW combined output.

The Jeep Compass will again receive an overhaul in 2024 with an intriguing plug-in hybrid variant, the 4xe, joining the line-up.

Set to arrive in the first half of 2024, the Compass 4xe pairs a 1.3-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine with an electric motor for a 179kW combined output. It maintains all-wheel drive and has a six-speed automatic transmission. Expect the 4xe version to be the most expensive version of the Compass by a significant margin when it arrives, if it follows the same pattern as its larger Grand Cherokee sibling.

Jeep says fuel economy is as low as 1.8L/100km, and the Compass 4xe can travel up to 50km under pure electric power alone. It also says the SUV will maintain its “all-terrain vocation with efficiency not being achieved at the expense of performance.”

Interestingly, the Compass will also be served in a plugless e-Hybrid variation, which is front-wheel drive only, featuring a small 14kW/55Nm electric motor and 95kW/230Nm 1.5-litre four-cylinder engine, driving the wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic.

04. Hyundai Tucson Hybrid - Mid-2024

Expected to arrive in mid-2024, the Tucson has been a long time coming for Hyundai.

At long last, Hyundai will strike at the ever-popular Toyota RAV4 Hybrid with its Tucson mid-sizer as a plugless hybrid.

Expected to arrive in mid-2024, the Tucson has been a long time coming for Hyundai, which already offers a plugless hybrid version of the smaller Kona and larger Santa Fe.

We don’t exactly know what specs the version which arrives in Australia will have, but overseas the Tucson HEV pairs a 1.6-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine with a 44kW electric motor, driving all four wheels via a six-speed automatic transmission. Combined power is rated at 168kW/349Nm, and fuel consumption is trimmed down to a low of 6.1L/100km.

It’s closer to that of the Nissan X-Trail e-Power than the very trim fuel consumption of the RAV4 Hybrid, but will make an appealing challenger in the space, regardless.

Read more about Hyundai Tucson hybrid:

05. Kia Sportage Hybrid - Q1

The Kia is confirmed to be available in front-wheel drive with fuel consumption said to be as low as 5.7L/100km.

The Sportage - which is the Hyundai Tucson’s sister car from Kia - will also receive its first hybrid variant, but much earlier in the year.

Again, competing with the likes of the RAV4 and and X-Trail plugless hybrids, we have a more accurate picture of what the local Sportage HEV will look like.

Expect the same 1.6-litre four-cylinder turbocharged engine, 44.2kW electric motor, six-speed automatic, and 1.5kW battery as the Tucson hybrid, although the Kia is confirmed to be available in front-wheel drive with fuel consumption said to be as low as 5.7L/100km.

The Sportage will join the existing and larger Sorento hybrids, and Kia Australia has confirmed supply of around 200 units a month. Significantly less than that of its RAV4 rival, but more than it has been able to bring in for the Sorento.

Read more about Kia Sportage Hybrid:

06. Mazda CX-90 PHEV - Late 2024

Mazda’s plug-in hybrid system works a little differently from other brands, placing a large electric motor in the transmission housing, paired to a computer actuated clutch plate.

Mazda launched the smaller mid-sized CX-60 in Australia with petrol, diesel and PHEV, but the PHEV version of the larger CX-90 will arrive later in 2024.

Mazda’s plug-in hybrid system works a little differently from other brands, placing a large electric motor in the transmission housing, paired to a computer actuated clutch plate. This makes take-offs a little less smooth than something like a Toyota hybrid, but Mazda says it’s all in the name of efficiency.

Overseas specs have the CX-90 PHEV sipping just 4.2L/100km and travelling up to 42km under electric power alone, and it’s also the most powerful version of the CX-90, producing a whopping 241kW/500Nm.

When it arrives, expect it to compete with the Kia Sorento PHEV, with pricing estimated to start from just under $100,000, also making it Mazda’s most expensive SUV ever.

Read more about Mazda CX-90 PHEV:

Mazda CX-90

Mazda CX-90
4.2
From
$73,800
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

07. Peugeot 408 PHEV - Q3

Sitting alongside the 3008 mid-size SUV, the 408 is a more coupe-styled alternative, and will be served exclusively in plug-in hybrid form, at least initially.

Peugeot is going all-in on the electrification front, with a slew of hybrids and electric cars having joined its range in 2023 with more to come in 2024.

The 408 is a new nameplate joining the brand’s roster. Sitting alongside the 3008 mid-size SUV, the 408 is a more coupe-styled alternative, and will be served exclusively in plug-in hybrid form, at least initially.

It will arrive in high-spec GT form with pricing from $68K. It is powered by a 1.6-litre four-cylinder petrol engine and 81kW electric motor for combined outputs of 165kW/360Nm - the same as the brand’s flagship 508 sedan and wagon.

Read more Peugeot 408 PHEV:

08. Peugeot 508 - 2024

What won’t change is the variants imported to Australia, which will continue to be plug-in hybrids only.

The 508 will also receive a facelift for the 2024 model year, although timing, pricing, and exact local specs are to be confirmed.

The upgrades include a significant exterior overhaul to match Peugeot’s latest styling cues, a software overhaul in the cabin, and several other minor tweaks and upgrades to its spec throughout.

What won’t change is the variants imported to Australia, which will continue to be plug-in hybrids only. This means a 1.6-litre turbocharged petrol engine and 81kW electric motor for combined outputs of 165kW/360Nm. It is capable of travelling 55km under electric power alone and is front-drive only.

Prices will likely take a hike for the 2024 model year, although the 508 already starts from a tall $81,610 before on-roads, well into premium territory.

Peugeot 508

Peugeot 508
3.6
From
$81,610
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

09. Citroen C5 X PHEV - 2024

Currently available with a 1.6-litre turbocharged engine in front-wheel drive only, a plug-in hybrid version will arrive some time in 2024, sharing its drivetrain with its Peugeot 408 relation.

The Citroen C5 X is part wagon, part crossover, but all a quirky offering from the ever-unconventional automaker.

Currently available with a 1.6-litre turbocharged engine in front-wheel drive only, a plug-in hybrid version will arrive some time in 2024, sharing its drivetrain with its Peugeot 408 relation. Overseas it has the same 165kW/360Nm combined output and 12.4kWh battery pack, although travels slightly further than the 508 at a WLTP-measured 63km.

Locally the C5 X is available as a single Shine variant in combustion form, priced from $57,670 before on-roads, but expect the PHEV to be significantly more expensive.

Read more about Citroen C5 X PHEV:

10. Mercedes-AMG GLC 63 - H2

Pairing a 2.0-litre turbo-petrol engine with an electric motor and small battery produces a combined 500kW/1020Nm.

If you think hybrids are all about efficiency, AMG wants to change your mind with the GLC 63.

Pairing a 2.0-litre turbo-petrol engine with an electric motor and small battery produces a combined 500kW/1020Nm.

As a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, the GLC 63 will even travel up to 12km without assistance from the petrol engine.

11. Volkswagen Touareg R - Early 2024

But the 14.1kWh battery pack also enables an all-electric driving range of around 48km.

The flagship version of the facelifted Touareg is the R, which uses a hybrid powertrain.

Producing 340kW/700Nm of power from a 3.0-litre turbo petrol V6 and electric motor, the Tourareg R certainly has the outputs to keep pace with other performance SUVs.

But the 14.1kWh battery pack also enables an all-electric driving range of around 48km.

12. MG3 Hybrid - 2024

It is as yet unclear when it will arrive in Australia, but MG has promised it will have internal-combustion and hybrid powertrains when it does.

The cheap and cheerful MG3, which currently dominates the light hatchback segment in Australia, is set to finally be replaced by a next-generation version in 2024. It is as yet unclear when it will arrive in Australia, but MG has promised it will have internal-combustion and hybrid powertrains when it does.

What to expect from the hybrid? We don’t know yet, but for a clue we can look at the hybrid MG ZS in Thailand, which pairs a 1.5-litre engine to an electric motor for a combined output of 130kW/200Nm driving the front wheels via an ‘e-CVT’ transmission.

It also remains to be seen if it can maintain its bargain basement pricing, especially given the new version looks more upmarket than it predecessor. MG has also alluded to the fact it is not anticipating a maximum five-star ANCAP rating for the new model.

13. Kia Sorento Hybrid & PHEV - H1

After a short delay compared to the combustion versions, the hybrid Sorento will return in plugless and plug-in forms in the first half of 2024.

After a short delay compared to the combustion versions, the hybrid Sorento will return in plugless and plug-in forms in the first half of 2024.

Don’t expect too many radical changes this time around, with the Sorento maintaining the same 1.6-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine, electric motor, and six-speed automatic transmission, for outputs totalling a combined 169kW for the HEV or 195kW for the PHEV.

Instead, the mid-life facelift focuses on styling and interior technology, with new software for its revised screen layout and an update to the safety suite to include the latest tech, like stop-and-go for the adaptive cruise and a new lane following assist feature.

Kia Sorento

Kia Sorento
3.9
From
$47,650
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

14. Toyota Camry Hybrid - H2

The ninth-generation Camry will bring with it a revised version of the TNGA-K platform which makes the current model so nice to drive.

The ninth-generation Camry will bring with it a revised version of the TNGA-K platform which makes the current model so nice to drive, as well as the fifth-generation hybrid system consisting of lighter and more efficient electric motors.

An all-wheel drive version will also debut overseas courtesy of a purely electric rear axle, although Toyota Australia has said there are no plans to offer the AWD version Down Under.

Design-wise, the new car is an evolution of the current model, although it offers the brand’s new LED light signature and family face, as well as a tech-packed interior which is clearly influenced by the new range of Crown models which will sit above it in some markets.

15. BYD Ute - H2

Unlike its popular rivals, BYD’s offering won’t be a turbo-diesel, instead it will be unique in Australia offering a plug-in hybrid powertrain it dubs 'Dual-Motor intelligence' (DM-i).

BYD has made some big promises for 2024, possibly the largest of the lot being its forthcoming ute. Unlike its popular rivals, though, BYD’s offering won’t be a turbo-diesel, instead it will be unique in Australia offering a plug-in hybrid powertrain it dubs 'Dual-Motor intelligence' (DM-i). In other BYD models overseas, this system can produce a whopping 500kW/760Nm

Not only that, the brand’s local division has promised the ute was designed with Australia in mind from the beginning, claiming it will be ‘best-in class’ when it launches.

The choice to go with plug-in hybrid over fully electric is said to be to maintain cost competitiveness with the current crop of utes, but also recognises there isn’t sufficient charging infrastructure to support a full EV truck outside major cities. Expect to see it in the second half of 2024 if all goes to plan for the brand.

16. BYD mid-size SUV - H1

The ute is only one part of BYD’s expansion plans in 2024, with it also promising a mid-size SUV, likely in the first half of the year.

The ute is only one part of BYD’s expansion plans in 2024, with it also promising a mid-size SUV, likely in the first half of the year.

This mid-sizer, which will sit above the Atto 3 in the brand’s Australian line-up, will be the Song Plus, also known as the Seal U in Europe, and it will be the first BYD to offer the aforementioned DM-i plug-in hybrid drivetrain in Australia.

While a local name is yet to be decided, its 1.5-litre four-cylinder PHEV offering, which produces 145kW combined with a 100km electric driving range, should be an interesting alternative to the current crop of popular combustion and hybrid family SUVs in the same space as the Toyota RAV4. A fully electric version, which exists in its Chinese home market, may also follow in the future.

BYD Atto 3

BYD Atto 3
3.6
From
$48,011
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

17. Nissan Qashqai e-Power - Q1

Instead of primarily driving the wheels with the combustion engine which is helped along by an electric motor, e-Power hybrids don’t even connect the engine to the wheels, making them drive purely electrically.

The Nissan Qashqai forms a big part of the Japanese brands efforts to reinvigorate its range, and in 2024 it will finally add the highly-anticipated 'e-Power' variants to the range.

The e-Power hybrid tech sets itself apart from Toyota’s popular hybrid synergy system by flipping the formula on its head. Instead of primarily driving the wheels with the combustion engine which is helped along by an electric motor, e-Power hybrids don’t even connect the engine to the wheels, making them drive purely electrically.

Like it did with the X-Trail previously, Nissan will only launch e-Power on the top-spec Ti variant priced from $51,590 initially, although the technology is expected to be introduced on lower specifications as time goes on.