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Does MG's warranty cover the electrics?

Answered by CarsGuide · 5 May 2021

Not sure where you heard that rumour, but it’s definitely not true. Car makers have to warrant the whole of a brand-new vehicle against any faults caused by either poor workmanship or faulty parts used to create the vehicle. The only way a manufacturer might be able to avoid that is if the vehicle had been modified and that modification could be shown to have caused the fault. An example would be where the car’s owner modified the wiring to add extra lights and had managed to damage the car’s wiring in the process, leading to an electrical failure. The other caveat is that you need to maintain a new vehicle according to the manufacturer’s official schedule. Without this preventative maintenance, a car company can be within its rights to deny a warranty claim. But again, it would need to be shown that the lack of maintenance was the cause of the particular failure.

Perhaps the rumour-mill created this as an incorrect response to the fact that MG in Australia warrants its conventionally-powered cars for seven years/unlimited kilometres while the brand’s hybrid and fully-electric models carry just a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty. To balance that, MG hybrids and EVs carry an eight-year/160,000km warranty on the actual battery unit.

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What can I do if my recently purchased used car has blown up?

Answered by CarsGuide · 5 May 2021

ACT law requires a licensed used-car dealer to offer a warranty of three months or 5000km warranty on used passenger vehicles which are less than 10 years old or have travelled less than 160,000km. So regardless of the mileage your car has covered, it’s already 12 years old if you bought it last year. Unfortunately, that really means you’re not covered and the car-yard you bought it from has – on the surface – no legal obligation to compensate you whatsoever.

Australian Consumer Law can over-ride state and territory warranty laws, but this might only apply if you could prove that the vehicle was of unmerchantable quality, not fit for purpose or had existing faults that weren’t disclosed to you at the time of purchase. None of this would be easy to prove after eight months of ownership. You could elect to have the car independently inspected to determine the cause of the failure, but even this may not be conclusive. You’d also need to be able to prove that you maintained and serviced the car correctly for the time you’ve owned it. The first step would be to contact the car-yard and ask for help on a goodwill basis. I wouldn’t be holding my breath, however.

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Which mid-size, diesel SUV should I buy?

Answered by CarsGuide · 5 May 2021

Mazda’s SUV range (CX-5 and CX-8) are popular with their owners and have a good reputation in the trade. Crucially, they’re also available with a turbo-diesel engine, so they fit your criteria on that basis. We’d also suggest you take a good look at the South Korean brands’ offerings (Hyundai and Kia) as these are also highly rated by the trade and those companies have been involved with small-capacity diesel engines for decades, so the technology is pretty well sorted.

It’s interesting that you’ve had a good run from your Holden Captiva as that is far from the experience of many owners and former owners of this particular vehicle. As the Captiva ages it is very likely to start giving trouble, so the best advice is to trade up to a newer vehicle sooner rather than later.

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Will a 2004 Ford Focus 2.0 manual clutch plate work in a 2009 Ford Focus?

Answered by CarsGuide · 5 May 2021

Although both the Ford Focus from 2004 and 2009 were both offered with a two-litre petrol engine, those engines were actually different in terms of their mechanical specification. With that in mid, it’s very unlikely that the clutch from the earlier car would be compatible with the later version. A quick search also revealed that the replacement clutch kits for each version of the Focus you’re dealing with carry a different part number which is a pretty good indication that there are differences between the two.

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Why is it hard to star my Hyundai i30?

Answered by CarsGuide · 5 May 2021

The hard starting and loss of power sound to me like a problem with the fuel pick-up or the fuel pump. In your Hyundai, the fuel filter is part of the pump assembly and lives in the actual fuel tank. Replacing the filter involves removing the pump from the tank, changing the filter and then replacing the whole assembly into the tank. If a hose has been crimped or an air leak introduced into this system, the pump may not be able to supply the engine with all the fuel it needs. A cold start-up is when an engine will suffer from this leak, while tight turns on a roundabout could be enough to starve the engine of fuel if the pick-up (the hose that dips into the petrol in the tank) isn’t in the right position inside the tank. The fact that these problems started when the car received a new fuel filter is a pretty good clue that something was not quite right when the car was put back together. I’d be going back to the workshop that fitted the filter, explaining the problem and giving the shop the opportunity to put things right.

The noise in your steering system is almost certainly due to a well known problem with these cars. The electrically-assisted steering system in your car uses a rubber coupling which can deteriorate over time. When this happens, a click or clunk can be heard. The solution is to have the rubber coupling replaced. Because the problem didn’t cause steering failure, Hyundai didn’t issue a recall for this, but a batch of earlier i30s (some cars built in 2007 and 2008) did have a steering coupling that could fail completely, leading to a loss of steering., These were recalled by Hyundai as part of a safety recall back in 2014.

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Why isn't the stop-start engine function working in on my 2021 Toyota RAV4?

Answered by CarsGuide · 27 Apr 2021

The stop-start function on modern cars works according to a variety of protocols. Fundamentally, if the car’s battery can cope with not having the engine running, then it will trigger the fuel-saving measure when the car is stationary. But, if the battery is low (you’ve recently been running in electric-only mode, for instance) or you have the car’s lights or air-conditioning switched on and the stereo blaring, then the car may decide that it needs to keep the engine running to keep those systems running. If that’s the case, the stop-start function will be over-ruled.

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Why is there a leak in my 1998 Holden Statesman?

Answered by CarsGuide · 27 Apr 2021

This is a very common complaint among owners of Holdens of this era. If you’ve checked all the likely places for water to enter, then you have to start thinking laterally. Does the car have an aftermarket of dealer-fitted rear spoiler? The mounting holes of these can be great places for water to enter the boot. But believe it or not, this series of full-sized Holdens was also susceptible to a manufacturing glitch where the rear quarter-light windows weren’t sealed properly. Water can, apparently, enter here and find it’s way into the boot. It sounds crazy, but I’m assured it’s a thing with these cars.

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My 2017 Toyota Kluger is just out of warranty and needs a new water pump, should Toyota cover the cost?

Answered by CarsGuide · 27 Apr 2021

The problem you have is that the car was already nine months out of warranty when the problem was first noticed. Even though the pump did not require replacement right there and then, if a leak has started, then the pump is damaged or worn and will eventually need replacement. There’s also a distinct probability that the leak had started weeks before it was spotted by your service workshop, so it may have been even closer to the warranty period when the problem first occurred.

I’m with you on this one; 39,000km is not good enough for a modern car to begin to require major replacement parts like a water pump. Rather than go through your dealership, consider contacting Toyota Australia’s customer service division directly and stating your case. Interestingly, since 2019, Toyota has offered a five-year warranty on its new cars and perhaps, if you’ve been a repeat customer or always had your Kluger serviced at a Toyota dealership, then you might find Toyota will help out even to the extent of providing the pump for you to have installed at your expense. If you don’t ask, you won’t get.

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Which of the Toyota LandCruiser is the most best?

Answered by CarsGuide · 27 Apr 2021

Only two six-cylinder diesel options were available in the LandCruiser from 2000 onwards. The 100 Series used a 4.2-litre turbo-diesel six-cylinder (dubbed the 1HD-FTE) which has lots of performance and a great reputation for reliability and durability. The base-model version of the 100 Series (officially known as the 105 Series) used the non-turbocharged 4.2-litre six-cylinder diesel (the 1HZ) which is even more long-lived with many owners recording more that half-a-million kilometres without major issues. The catch is that the 1HZ with just 96kW of power and 285Nm of torque felt pretty underwhelming in the relatively heavy LandCruiser. The turbocharged 1HD-FTE, meanwhile, could muster up a more meaningful 151kW and 430Nm. Both those engine options ran until the end of the 100 Series which was eventually replaced by the 200 Series in 2007. At that point, the only diesel engine offered was the twin-turbo V8 diesel. Early examples of this engine gave some problems, but Toyota made running changes to improve that and the V8 Diesel is now also highly regarded.

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Which generation Focus can I use to replace a window on a 2016 Ford Focus?

Answered by CarsGuide · 27 Apr 2021

The Mark 3 Ford Focus was sold here from 2011 until 2018, so, on the surface, pretty much any car from that range should be able to offer up a replacement front window. But it’s not that simple. The rear window could be a bit more specific, because the Focus was available as a four-door sedan and a five-door hatchback, so the rear doors on each of these variants could be different. Other potential incompatibility issues could crop up between the very early version of this car which was built in Germany, and the later version (which you have) which was built in Thailand. There’s another catch in this apparently simple task, too: For the facelift in mid-2015, Ford was chasing greater interior refinement and, to achieve that, switched to thicker side glass. That means you need to find a window from a post-2015 car as the thinner glass of earlier models will probably be incompatible with the rest of the window hardware in your car.

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