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Nissan X-Trail
EXPERT RATING
7.0
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Nissan X-Trail

Nissan X-Trail Pricing and Specs

2021 price from
$30,040*

The Nissan X-Trail is available from $30,040 to $48,490 for the 2021 SUV across a range of models.

Nissan's X-Trail mid-size SUV often finds itself mixing with the best-sellers in its segment, and at least part of that popularity comes down to the wide variety of flavours it's offered in. Given a handsome makeover in 2014, the X-Trail is offered in five or seven seat configurations, with buyers also able to opt for front- or four-wheel drive and a choice between petrol or diesel engines. But given its diminutive dimensions, those with a third row of seats will find space a little tighter than in a dedicated seven seat vehicle, while those who opt for a five seater will trade those two extra seats for improved boot space.

The X-Trail ST (4X2) starts off at $30,040, while the range-topping, X-Trail TL (4X4) TAN Leather is priced at $48,490.

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Year Price From Price To
2021 $30,040 $48,490
2020 $21,600 $49,280
2019 $19,000 $46,530
2018 $17,300 $37,180
2017 $15,200 $34,540
2016 $13,400 $31,240
2015 $12,200 $28,380
2014 $9,000 $23,650
2013 $7,800 $18,040
2012 $6,500 $16,280
2011 $5,900 $14,520
2010 $6,200 $13,090
2009 $5,500 $11,550
2008 $4,600 $9,680
2007 $3,700 $8,140
2006 $3,000 $6,820
2005 $2,800 $5,940
2004 $2,400 $4,950
2003 $2,000 $5,170
2002 $2,200 $4,510
2001 $2,400 $4,070

Nissan X-Trail FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Nissan X-Trail here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Why is my 2012 Nissan X-Trail using a lot of oil?

    Let’s start with the black exhaust pipe. All cars that run on unleaded petrol have a sooty black exhaust. The soot will be thicker if the car isn’t tuned properly, but really, the blackness is just a by-product of burning ULP.

    Your oil use of about a litre every 1500km is getting towards the top of what is acceptable. Even then, it’s more than this engine should consume. The fact is that all engines use some oil, but it’s usually not enough to require topping up between oil changes. But with your usage rate, you’d need to keep a close eye on the dipstick.

    The oil is clearly going somewhere, so check on the ground under where the car is parked each night and look for a pool of oil that suggests the problem is an external leak rather than internal engine wear. From there, have a workshop conduct a compression and leak-down test. The results of this will tell you if the engine’s internal parts are worn and leading to the oil being consumed.

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  • What caused my 2006 Nissan X-Trail to overheat and lose compression?

    I’m afraid to say, David, that it sounds like you’ve prematurely ended the engine’s life. I’d say a blown head gasket is just the beginning of your woes here, and it’s likely you’ve `cooked’ the engine; a mechanic’s description for getting the engine so hot inside that the piston rings have lost tension (hence no compression) or parts of the engine have even melted internally, with obvious results. It’s also common for this type of thing to have the engine more or less weld itself together, at which point it won’t even turn over on the starter motor.

    You might be lucky and simply have to replace the head gasket, but even then, you’d be wise to have the cylinder head checked for straightness. If the cylinder head is warped (as a result of the heat) then you might need a new one, at which point you might find the cost of repairs suddenly goes beyond the actual value of a 2006 X-Trail. The moral of the story is to keep an eye on the temperature gauge and not to ignore the first signs of the engine beginning to run hot. Pulling up to add water after the thing has overheated is a classic case of shutting the gate after the horse has bolted.

    If you do wish to keep the car, my advice would be - once you’ve established the extent of the carnage - to find a good second-hand engine from a wrecked X-Trail and have that fitted. It would almost certainly be the cheaper option in the long run.

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  • What is the best family SUV for around $20000?

    While the Mitsubishi Outlander is spacious, reliable and easy to drive, our experience testing it against rival medium SUVs have found it to be noisy and a little too firm riding to be truly comfortable and relaxing. At your price point, there are better alternatives out there. 

    Have you considered a Mazda CX-5? In petrol or diesel, we have found it to be a superior and more economical proposition, and is definitely quieter and more refined. Plus, the Mazda's all-wheel-drive system is more sophisticated and better at dealing with loose surfaces like sand.

    A late-model (post 2014) S5-series Subaru Forester 2.5i petrol is far more economical than the earlier iterations, since it switched to a more efficient CVT continuously variable transmission. And there's also the 2.0D turbo-diesel which is economical. This, too, is a fine SUV on-road or for light off-road driving.

    Finally, the Nissan X-Trail diesel is a roomy and capable choice, especially from 2017, when it received a 2.0-litre turbo-diesel to replace the older 1.6L unit.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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