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2022 Nissan X-Trail
See our complete guide for the Nissan X-Trail

2022 Nissan X-Trail Pricing and Specs

From
$30,040*

The Nissan X-Trail 2022 prices range from $30,040 for the basic trim level SUV X-Trail ST (4X2) to $48,490 for the top of the range SUV X-Trail TL (4X4) TAN Leather.

The Nissan X-Trail 2022 is available in Regular Unleaded Petrol and Diesel. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the SUV 2.0L 6 SP Manual to the SUV 2.0L Continuous Variable.

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Nissan X-Trail Models SPECS PRICE
ST (2WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $32,665
ST (2WD) 2.0LRegular Unleaded Petrol6 speed manual $30,665
ST (4WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $34,665
ST (4X2) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $32,040
ST (4X2) 2.0LRegular Unleaded Petrol6 speed manual $30,040
ST (4X4) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $34,040
ST 7 Seat (2WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $34,265
ST 7 Seat (4X2) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $33,640
ST-L (2WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $38,525
ST-L (4WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $40,525
ST-L (4X2) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $37,850
ST-L (4X4) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $39,850
ST-L 7 Seat (2WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $40,125
ST-L 7 Seat (4X2) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $39,450
TI (4WD) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $45,965
TI (4WD) TAN Leather 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $45,965
Ti (4x4) 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $45,490
TI (4X4) TAN Leather 2.5LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $45,490
TL (4X4) 2.0LDieselCVT auto $48,490
TL (4X4) TAN Leather 2.0LDieselCVT auto $48,490
TS (4X4) 2.0LDieselCVT auto $36,840
TS Diesel (4WD) 2.0LDieselCVT auto $37,465

Nissan X-Trail 2022 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Nissan X-Trail here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • How much would it cost to convert my 2003 Nissan X-trail to electric?

    There’s no simple answer to this as the final cost will depend on how much performance and battery range you wish to engineer into the car. That said, the basic cost of a kit to convert a conventional car to run on electricity is somewhere between $20,000 and $30,000, but that includes only the very basics. Neither does that figure include the cost of the battery-packs that you’ll also need, so the cost will only go up from that figure. All engineering sign-offs would add dollars to the final tally, too.

    Converting petrol cars to run as EVs is a real trend right now, but if you look at the types of cars being converted, there’s a common theme running through them: The majority of conversion candidates are older, simpler cars with none of the safety systems that a 2003 Nissan X-Trail has as standard. It’s much easier, for instance, to convert a car with no air-bags, no anti-lock brakes and no stability control. If the car in question lacks power-assisted brakes and power-steering, even better. 

    This is not to say that the conversion can’t be done, but it’s much simpler – and cheaper – to convert something old-school (like an air-cooled Volkswagen) than converting your relatively modern Nissan. You’d need to ensure that the car’s anti-lock brakes and air-bags (and everything else) still worked and then be able to prove that to an engineer before the car could be legally registered and driven on public roads.

    What you’d end up with would be a Nissan X-Trail that represented maybe $50,000 and still only had 150km of range between recharges. Those numbers simply don’t add up when you can buy a second-hand EV – a Nissan Leaf, for instance – for comfortably less than $20,000; a car that is already legal to register and drive. 

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  • Why does my 2018 Nissan X-Trail make a rattle noise when I have my foot on the brake?

    It sounds as though something is loose in the transmission and is vibrating (the noise you hear) when the brakes are applied and the load is taken off the transmission. Then, when the brakes are released, the load reapplies to the transmission (as the car begins to creep forward) and whatever is rattling is suddenly under load again and stops making the noise.

    This could be down to something in the transmission itself, and if that’s the case, could be a worn torque converter. This is the component that actually turns the engine’s power into a force that drives the transmission and, eventually, the wheels. Inside the torque converter is a series of vanes. If one of these is loose or damaged, a rattle can be the result.

    However, before you rush to that conclusion, have a good look under the car. There’s every chance the noise is a simple case of a heat shield, bash-plate or even part of the exhaust system rattling at a particular engine frequency. When you take your foot off the brake and the car starts to move, the engine revs change, the vibration frequency changes at the same time, and whatever it is stops rattling. An internally broken catalytic converter is also a prime suspect for producing a rattle at certain vibration frequencies.

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  • What car should I buy to tow a trailer?

    While turbo-diesels aren’t perfect for everybody, when it comes to towing trailers, they do a pretty impressive job. The combination of a torquey diesel engine with an automatic transmission is a pretty handy one when you have a decent sized trailer hooked up. The caveat with a modern diesel, however, is that if most of your driving is urban running about, then the diesel is probably not for you. That’s because the emissions system on a modern diesel (the particulate filter) needs regular longer runs at freeway speeds to avoid giving trouble. But if, as you say, you tow a trailer often, then that should provide the load on the engine the diesel requires to remain trouble-free.

    The good news is that the dominance of the SUV right now means that just about every car-maker has a mid-sized SUV in its showrooms right now. So really, you’re spoiled for choice. I’m not surprised the X-Trail is found a bit wanting at times; even brand-new, that version of the petrol-engined X-Trail could feel a bit underdone. You’ll be amazed at how good newer vehicles have become.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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