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Nissan Qashqai


Ford EcoSport

Summary

Nissan Qashqai

Nissan's Qashqai has achieved something remarkable. After enduring a name change for its second generation (it used to be called Dualis), it has maintained its strong popularity among Australian buyers who are switching en masse to SUVs. 

The compact SUV market is becoming increasingly crowded - the Dualis had few competitors on its release but today's Qashqai has 27 of them. The Nissan has seemingly brushed off all-comers, consistently and persistently battling with the Mitsubishi ASX, Mazda CX-3 and Honda HR-V.

It's mid-life update has arrived and as night follows day, MY18 supercedes MY17, with new additions to the safety list, a farewell to diesel power and a detail-focussed update to the range.

Safety rating
Engine Type2.0L
Fuel TypeRegular Unleaded Petrol
Fuel Efficiency6.9L/100km
Seating5 seats

Ford EcoSport

One of the original entrants in the now-booming small SUV segment has never attracted the attention it probably should have. I’m talking about the Ford EcoSport.

The smallest SUV from the blue oval brand is built in India, and perhaps that’s part of the reason it hasn’t been that well received. I went on the international launch of the EcoSport way back in mid 2013, and some of the fit and finish left a lot to be desired.

That didn’t change when the car launched in Australia, and while the pricing it launched with was attractive, there were other elements that perhaps weren’t… like the tailgate-mounted spare wheel.

That spare wheel remains a feature for the time being (a further model change for the MY18.5 version will see the deletion of it in favour of a repair kit, and thus no spare) - but there have been some other styling changes for the Ford EcoSport 2018 range, and perhaps even more importantly, new drivetrains and big interior revisions.

It is undoubtedly an improvement, but just how much has it improved? Read on to find out.

Safety rating
Engine Type1.5L
Fuel TypePremium Unleaded Petrol
Fuel Efficiency6.5L/100km
Seating5 seats

Verdict

Nissan Qashqai7.1/10

The Qashqai's MY18 update is subtle but effective. It had a good base to start with, so it was all about detailed improvements. Ride and handling are better, it looks a bit more modern, the safety gear is improved and the exit of the diesel won't upset too many people.

As for which Qashqai is best, it's probably the ST-L - a good mix of spec and price make it our pick. As a range, it's likely the Qashqai will continue to sell as well as it has, despite stiffening competition. It has a solid reputation, well-judged spec and it can carry people and things in comfort and reasonable style.

The Qashqai's mid-life update is upon us - does it keep it in the hunt as pressure builds from Japan, Korea and Germany?


Ford EcoSport7.1/10

If you’re going to buy a Ford EcoSport, it seems to me that the best one you can get is the Titanium - and that’s mainly because of Ford’s aggressive pricing strategy. The equipment on offer is compelling, especially looking at what else you get in competitor compact SUVs at that price point.

Again, I’m disappointed by the lack of AEB - but if that’s not a deal-breaker for you, the EcoSport may well prove a surprisingly adept option as a small high-rider. Just watch that tailgate in tight parking spots…

Would you prefer a spare wheel on the tailgate, or none at all? Let us know in the comments section below.

Design

Nissan Qashqai7/10

The exterior design has been left largely alone, with just a small amount of surgery to bring it up to date with current Nissan thinking. There's a new iteration of the 'V Motion' grille, revised headlights and more interesting bumper designs front and rear.

The cabin is largely the same - beautifully built, most of the materials are pleasant to the touch if not exactly an aesthete's delight. Everything is well laid-out, the dash is clear and the switchgear all perfectly pleasant. 

The space is well proportioned, too and with the big sunroof, flooded with light, so it doesn't feel the slightest bit tight or claustrophobic, quite a feat in a car this size.


Ford EcoSport7/10

According to Ford, the new look “fits in the contemporary Ford SUV showroom”, and its design certainly looks more fitting when parked alongside the next-size-up Escape. It has a new bonnet, new headlights (halogen on the entry grades and HID on the flagship), a new grille shape with different colour trims based on variant (entry - grey, mid-spec - gloss black and top-spec - chrome) a revised front bumper and revised rear-end styling, too. There's a dinky little rear spoiler, but no body kit or side steps.

It remains one of the more ruggedly styled offerings in the segment, with a more muscled appearance than, say, the Honda HR-V or Mazda CX-3. The spare wheel has a lot to do with that.

While the spare wheel will be removed from the tailgate in the coming months, the one fitted to this version has been redesigned. And if you’re worried about hitting that cover when reversing, the reversing camera should alleviate your concerns, and the rear parking sensors are tuned with it in mind.

Just keep in mind that if you park on the street and someone parks close to the back of you, you may struggle to open the boot - along with swinging open the wrong direction (the opening side should be closest to the kerb, but it’s on the traffic side!), the rearmost door is quite big. 

Still, the interior has seen perhaps the most important changes, both in terms of aesthetics and usability. Its interior dimensions are impressive, as you'll see in the interior images below.

Practicality

Nissan Qashqai7/10

The Qashqai has five seats and in a pinch, you can fill them all without causing a riot or medical emergency. Sadly, there is no seven-seat option.

Rear legroom is good, with enough room behind my driving position for folks of up to 185cm. There is tons of headroom front and rear even with the panoramic sunroof of the higher model spec. The interior dimensions mean four adults can cheerfully fit, with its light airy design (evident in the photos) made even brighter if you've got the full-length sunroof open.

Cabin storage includes up to four cupholders (ST and ST-L miss out on a rear armrest, so no vessel holding back there) and four bottle holders. The glove box easily swallows the owners manual.

The Qashaqi's boot space is nearly number one in its class, bettered only by Honda's HR-V. With 430 litres, it has the luggage capacity for a family getaway and the size for every day needs such as shopping or carrying the kids and their gear around.

Drop the 60/40 split fold back seats and you're in dangerous territory if you live near an Ikea - the space almost triples to 1596 litres and somehow people put these two facts together and your weekends are lost - although I guess it depends how much you like helping people.


Ford EcoSport7/10

There is no denying the Ford EcoSport is one of the most practical small SUVs you can buy. After all, it can fit a washing machine in the boot - that was one of the big selling points for Indian buyers, apparently - so storage space, size, luggage capacity and dimensions are all important.

The boot space is even more practical now, with a variable shelf system offering the option of a deeper cargo hold, a small hidden area in the mid-range position, and a flat (but sloping?) cargo area with the back seats folded - you do that by lifting up the rear seat bases, then lowering the backrests down. In that configuration there is 1178 litres of cargo capacity (SAE - the more generous of the formulae to measure space) to the roof, while seats up the figure stands at 743L (SAE). If that's not enough, you get roof rails on the top two models, so you can add a roof rack if you need to.

The storage has been improved for occupants, too, with a new centre console bin between the front seats, while rear-seat occupants get a fold-down centre armrest in the mid- and top-spec models. In those versions there are two cupholders in the back as well as two up front, while all four doors feature bottle holders. The front passenger seat lacks height adjustment, and taller occupants may feel like they’re looming large in that position.

Space is good for the class, especially for rear legroom and headroom. If you try and fit three across the back it’ll be tight, but for those younger buyers with children there are dual ISOFIX child-seat anchor points, and three top-tether hooks. 

The centre console area has been reworked with a new storage area in front of the gear selector that is almost deep enough for a smartphone to sit, but it’ll inevitably fall over. There are two USB ports in all EcoSports, and they’re illuminated, which is a bonus, but the air conditioner controls are cheap feeling.

Above that area is a new media screen - a 6.5-inch version in the base model Ambiente, and an 8.0-inch infotainment unit in the Trend and Titanium. It’s touch-capacitive, and the Sync 3 media interface is simple to use, and no matter which model you go for, there’s Apple CarPlay and Android Auto phone mirroring tech.

Price and features

Nissan Qashqai7/10

The MY18's launch will see four Nissan Qashqai models on the price list: the ST, ST-L, N-TEC and Ti. The N-TEC will be with us throughout early 2018 when the advanced safety technology of the Ti becomes available. The current plan is that the N-TEC will disappear when that happens.

The 2018 Qashqai introduces a number of new features as standard across the range. All of them now have forward collision warning, auto emergency braking and lane departure warning. These are in addition to front and rear parking sensors and the reversing camera carried over from the 2017 models. 

Pricing hasn't moved very much, meaning how much you pay for a Qashqai has only changed due to the new spec level and the end of the diesel models. The ST is up by $500, the ST-L and N-TEC don't really have obvious counterparts given the demise of the diesel and the petrol Ti is $1000 more. Having said that, the ST-L is $1000 cheaper than the old TS.

Pricing for the ST range opener kicks off at $26,490 for the manual and $28,990 for the CVT auto. Rolling on 17-inch alloys, the ST has a six-speaker stereo, cruise control, cloth trim, keyless entry and start, air-conditioning and a space saver spare tyre.

The ST's sound system is powered by a 5.0-inch touchscreen and features an AM/FM radio, CD player, MP3 player and you can connect your iPhone or Android device via USB or Bluetooth. Sadly - and this goes for the whole range - there is not yet Apple CarPlay or Android Auto support.

Next up is the ST-L, starting at $32,990. On top of the ST spec you'll get 18-inch alloys, roof rails, fog lights, electric and heated folding mirrors, GPS sat nav, partial leather seats, heated seats, electric drivers seat and around-view cameras (as well as the normal reversing camera).

The infotainment screen is pumped up to 7.0-inches and DAB+ digital radio joins the list.

The gadgets list expands with the N-TEC, which will stick around until the Ti's arrival. Priced from $36,490, this one includes 19-inch alloys with fatter tyres, LED headlights (in addition to the LED daytime running lights), dual-zone climate control to replace the standard AC, auto headlights and wipers, panoramic sunroof, rear centre armrest, auto parking and mood lighting. The safety list expands with blind spot monitoring, high beam assist and reverse cross traffic alert.

The $37,990 top of the range Ti will land sometime before the middle of 2018. Compared with the N-TEC, the Ti is basically the same but adds nappa leather interior, lane keep assist and active cruise control

Should the N-TEC be wildly successful, would it stick around? We asked, but Nissan wouldn't speculate. The reason for the Ti's late arrival is related to production availabilty of the lane keep assist and active cruise combination.

As for the colour choices, there are now eight colours for the Qashqai. As before, 'Ivory Pearl' (white) and 'Pearl Black' are no extra cost. The remaining colours - 'Platinum' (a light grey silver), 'Gun Metallic' (dark grey), 'Night Shade' (a sort of purple blue) and 'Magnetic Red' all cost $495. The new 'Vivid Blue', which is exactly what it sounds like, is new to the range and is also $495.

Those looking for more exotic colours like orange or gold will sadly miss out and the earthy tones of brown are also unavailable.

For a more detailed comparison, see our model snapshots.


Ford EcoSport9/10

The Ford EcoSport has one of the most compact model ranges in the segment, with three variants that aren’t priced too far from one another. In fact, from the bottom of the range to the top, there’s only a $6200 gap. 

However, it is a simple line-up, which means there’s not as much choice for buyers. All three versions are petrol powered, automatic, and front-wheel drive - which is exactly what the vast majority of customers in the small SUV segment demand. But in order to compare the models in the range, keep reading for our model comparison.

How much is the cost of Ford EcoSport? At the bottom of the price list is the entry-grade Ambiente is $22,790 plus on-road costs (rrp), which is good vs most of its rivals. It kicks off proceedings with a 6.5-inch touchscreen media system running Ford’s 'Sync 3' media console, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, Bluetooth connectivity with phone and audio streaming, two USB ports, CD player DAB radio, voice control, central locking, cruise control, a sound system with six speakers (no subwoofer, no DVD player) and cloth seat trim. 

It rides on ugly 16-inch steel wheels with plastic covers (rip them off and roll on steelies - own it!) and has silver exterior trim elements that delineate it as a base car. All members of the EcoSport range now include a 4.2-inch digital driver information screen between the dials, which includes a digital speedo, and the Ambiente is fitted with a reversing camera and rear parking sensors as standard.

The mid-range model in the EcoSport line-up is the Trend, which sits midway up the price range at $24,490. 

The Trend adds black roof-rails, black exterior trim elements, 16-inch alloy wheels, a leather-lined steering wheel, and it moves the media game along with an 8.0-inch touch screen with Sync 3, inbuilt sat nav / GPS with free map updates for the navigation system for life, and a seven-speaker sound system.

The Titanium is $28,990, which is relatively affordable considering some other competitors are well into the low-to-mid $30k zone with their front-drive petrol high-riders.

It comes with all the stuff the Trend has but adds keyless entry / smart key, push button start, climate control air-conditioning, automatic headlights, rain-sensing wipers, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, power sunroof, leather seats, HID projector headlights and LED daytime running lights (not LED headlight), bigger 17-inch alloys, powered side mirrors with puddle lamps, and silver roof rails.

And it takes the safety game a step further as well, with blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert, not to mention front parking sensors. 

But, and it’s a big but, the Ford lacks some of the great safety technology features you’ll find in some its competitors. See the safety section below for more on that.

If you're in the market for a used EcoSport, you might be happy with the second hand price that most early versions fetch - they are quite affordable. And while the number of Ford EcoSport colours isn't as extensive as it once was, you can still get black, white, blue, silver, grey, and a new brown hue. There is no red, nor is there that eye-catching yellow anymore. There is no 'black pack' yet, but Ford did have a Shadow edition back in 2016, so it could happen.

While avoiding cows may be an everyday consideration in India, there are no special features like a bull bar, nor a nudge bar. You can't get a snorkel for it (you wouldn't need one!), but there is a tyre change tool kit in the boot. You can get accessories like floor mats and a boot scuff guard. 

Engine & trans

Nissan Qashqai7/10

The petrol vs diesel decision is no longer part of the equation - as President Trump might say, diesel's ratings were low, with just under 10 percent of cars sold drinking the DERV.

Despite its availability in overseas markets, all-wheel drive is not available in Australia, perhaps because of the X-Trail's popularity (and close relationship to the Qashqai).

The only available engine is Nissan's 2.0-litre naturally-aspirated petrol developing 106kW/200Nm. This neatly side-steps any turbo problems as it's a fairly straightforward sort of engine. As far as engine size goes, it is consistent with its Mazda rival, the CX-3 which also runs a 2.0-litre petrol.

The manual gearbox is a six-speed (just three percent of buyers choose to change their own gears) and mated to the same (MR20DD) engine. For those interested, this engine employs a chain rather than timing belt.

For CVT-equipped cars, the towing capacity is 1200kg for a braked trailer and a very specific 729kg for unbraked, so you can haul a decent load. 

As with 4 wheel drive, an LP gas fuelled Qashqai is also a non-starter from the factory.

Engine specs across the segment aren't remarkably different - some are smaller turbo engines, but most around the 1.8 to 2.0-litre mark. The Qashqai's acceleration performance figures for the 0-100km/h dash are around ten seconds (CVT). Kerb weight ranges from 1343kg for the manual ST to 1429kg for the Ti.

Oil capacity is 3.8 litres and the recommended oil type is 5W-30.


Ford EcoSport7/10

It's a tale of the specifications here. 

There is more than one engine to choose from (and for this reviewer, the engine you choose will determine the rating the car scores, too), but there is no diesel available (so you'll have to reserve that good old 'petrol vs diesel' debate for the Escape - still you get a fuel tank capacity of 52 litres, a good size so you'll be able to do plenty of distance). And the EcoSport isn't available in Australia with 4x4 / AWD / or rear wheel drive - every EcoSport is 4x2, or front wheel drive. 

The entry-grade Ambiente model is powered by a new three-cylinder non-turbocharged 1.5-litre motor, and is mated with a six-speed conventional automatic transmission. The horsepower outputs for the Ambiente are pretty good, with 90kW of power and 150Nm of torque. 

The existing Ambiente had a 1.5-litre non-turbo engine with a five-speed manual transmission or one of Ford’s now-infamous six-speed dual-clutch auto transmissions. But manual vs automatic demand, and the apparent automatic transmission problems with the dual-clutch auto, saw the switch to a conventional torque-converter auto.

Engine size for the Trend and Titanium models drops to a 1.0-litre three-cylinder with a turbocharger, which has a touch more punch to it despite its smaller capacity. The outputs are 92kW and 170Nm, which is easily enough to push the little high-rider along with ease. 

Previously, buyers of the higher-spec models had the choice of a 1.5-litre non-turbo four-cylinder which had 10kW and 30Nm less, and was teamed to a six-speed dual-clutch auto, or the 1.0-litre turbo with a five-speed manual gearbox… which no-one bought.

Now, though, the 1.0-litre 'EcoBoost' engine is available with a conventional six-speed auto, and in the Titanium you get paddle-shifters, too. There haven't been any major reports of engine issues with the tiny EcoBoost engine, which runs a timing belt - not a chain - presumably to save weight. The gross vehicle weight for the EcoSport is between 1705kg (Ambiente) and 1755kg (Trend and Titanium), with kerb weight pegged at 1319kg (Ambiente) and 1368kg (Trend and Titanium).

This ain’t no tow truck: it's towinc capacity is 750kg for an un-braked trailer, or 900kg for a braked trailer. 

Fuel consumption

Nissan Qashqai7/10

The offical combined cycle fuel economy figure for the 2.0-litre are 7.7L/100km for the manual and 6.9L/100km for the CVT. On test, which was partly highway and a good chunk of Victorian back roads, our fuel consumption figure was a neat 8.0L/100km.

Fuel tank capacity is 65 litres.


Ford EcoSport6/10

Claimed fuel consumption for the Ambiente model is rated at a pretty thirsty 6.9 litres per 100km, while the Trend and Titanium are said to use a touch less: 6.7L/100km. For those who prefer the measurement of fuel consumption km/L, the Ambiente will do 14.5km/L and the Trend/Titanium models will be capacble of 14.9km/L. Not quite diesel fuel economy, but enough to ensure pretty good mileage per tank.

The readout on the Trend I drove displayed 7.6L/100km after a mix of urban and highway driving, while the Ambiente showed 8.2L/100km in some horrific Melbourne traffic.

Driving

Nissan Qashqai7/10

The Qashqai has always been near the top of the class when it comes to ride and handling if not quite there for off-road ability - front-wheel drive and the absence of hill descent control pretty much nixes any muddy fun ambitions. Nissan doesn't quote a wading depth, so that should also tell you it's not for rock-hopping.

Front suspension is by McPherson struts while the rear is a multi-link set-up, something you expect from the next segment up. The MY18 features firmer springs, retuned damping and stiffer anti-roll bars. Out on the flowing country roads outside Daylesford, the new set-up wasn't remarkably different to the old, but the body felt slightly better-controlled without ruining the excellent ride.

On 18-inch wheels, road noise seems lower. Part of that comes from additional sound-deadening and some thicker glass in the rear. The wing mirrors still whistle faintly, but it's nothing the stereo can't handle, and you'll really only hear it at speed.

Switch to the 19s as fitted to the N-TEC (and Ti), and all those efforts seem defeated - there's some tyre roar at highway speeds, attributable to both the lower profile of the tyres and their extra width. The ride doesn't seem to suffer though, and it's a pleasant place to be in suburban and city traffic, soaking up the bumps quietly and smoothly.

Unladen ground clearance measures 186mm, which is among the higher-riders in the class and it was quite at home on a deeply-potholed back road. It was perhaps a little firmer than expected over the gravel, but the surface was very poorly-maintained and resembled the Ypres battlefield. Despite only driving the front wheels, it felt secure, the torque vectoring system helping keep it on the straight and narrow. The turning circle is usable if not tight at 10.7 metres.

It rides well, but what's the engine like? I won't lie, I'd like a bit more horsepower, but in a drag race, the Qashqai is going to be pretty much neck and neck with most of the cars in the segment. 

In the cruise it's a quiet engine and the CVT keeps the revs low until you floor it for an overtake, which you will need to do. Then the engine winds up with the CVT keeping it on the boil to make the most of engine specs. Around town both engine and gearbox are unobtrusive.


Ford EcoSport7/10

Ford has a knack when it comes to making its SUVs drive like smaller cars than they actually are - and the steering is the key.

In the EcoSport that’s definitely the case. Sure, it is actually small, but it feels decidedly more nimble than some of its rivals, with great steering feel, weighting and response that allows the driver plenty of confidence, whether piloting it along a highway or parking it kerbside.

The front and rear suspension is well sorted, if a little firm over sharp bumps - but it sits well on the road, and is easily comfortable enough to deal with tram tracks, potholes and cracked pavement.

The obvious star engine is the turbocharged 1.0-litre, which is rewardingly punchy and nicely refined while retaining the trademark three-cylinder rumble. The six-speed auto is inherently eager to go for the highest gear it can to save fuel, and that means it will hunt a bit when you’re on and off the throttle. That might make your 0 100 acceleration timing a bit difficult, but it gathers speed decently. 

Thankfully, though, the throttle is easy to modulate - which isn’t the case in the 1.5-litre. There’s a little too much travel at the top of the pedal to make for smooth take-offs, and when you get moving the engine has a tendency to allow the throttle to hang before it changes gears.

In both models the brake pedal took some getting used to, again with a dull spot at the top of the pedal then big grabbiness mid-way. It stopped reasonably well though, especially considering it still uses drum brakes at the back. 

In case we didn't make it clear, there will be no off road review for the EcoSport. It may have good potential capability and performance if you look at the numbers: 209 (ground clearance mm); 10.7 (turning circle radius in metres, kerb to kerb); 24.7 (approach angle degrees); 29.0 (departure angle degrees) - but there is no wading depth figure, and hey, it's front-wheel drive!

 

Safety

Nissan Qashqai8/10

All Qashqais leave the Sunderland UK factory with at least six SRS airbags, ABS, stability and traction controls, forward collision warning, reversing camera, forward auto emergency braking, front and rear parking sensors and lane departure warning.

You can fit a baby car seat for your child using either one of the three top-tether anchor points or two ISOFIX points.

ST-L buyers pick up around-view cameras with moving object detection.

The N-TEC adds to the safety list with rear cross traffic alert, blind spot warning, park assist and drowsiness detection. Finally, the Ti's specifications include 'Intelligent Lane Intervention', which helps keep you in your lane if you drift towards the edge.

The safety rating is five ANCAP stars, regardless of model. It was last tested in 2014.


Ford EcoSport7/10

It may seem harsh to give the Ford EcoSport a 7/10 for a safety rating, especially considering it has features such as a reverse camera, park assist with rear parking sensors, stability control with hill descent control and hill start assist, ESP, and it retains a five-star ANCAP crash-test rating from 2013. Where is the Ford EcoSport built? You can leave your preconceptions at the door, because it's made in India. 

But the fact of the matter is that the EcoSport doesn’t have the latest advanced safety tech - there is no auto emergency braking (AEB) and “there won’t for in the foreseeable future”, either, according to the company. You can put a line through things like lane keeping assist and forward collision warning, too.

But the EcoSport hits back in other ways. It has a system where it can call the emergency services using a connected phone in the event of an accident. And it has a dual key system that allows worried (interfering?) parents to adjust key parameters of the car, including how fast it can go and how loud the music can go. And if you need to fit a baby seat, it has ISOFIX points.

It has seven airbags (dual front, front side, full-length curtain and driver’s knee).

Ownership

Nissan Qashqai7/10

Nissan offers a three year/100,000km warranty and your dealer will almost certainly try and flog you an extended warranty. 

Those worried about service costs will be pleased to note that the MY18 Qasqhai capped price servicing regime is the same price as the previous year's. Service intervals remain at 12 months or 10,000km, with service prices bouncing around from $224 to $532 and averaging $307 over 12 services.

The Qashqai's resale value appears to be performing well and is as good as any in the compact SUV class. A good guide is to expect around 60 percent of the car's value to be retained over three years.

Owners seem to score it well for reliability, with few common faults reported. Searching for gearbox problems, clutch problems, cruise control problems or injector problems produce few results. As there is no longer a diesel option, searching for diesel problems is redundant.


Ford EcoSport7/10

Ford backs its new cars with the bare minimum three-year/100,000km warranty plan. Well behind the best in class, and it could be enough for you to reconsider if you've read about the issues, common problems, faults, complaints and defects that could have possibly afflicted some earlier versions with the dual-clutch auto. And if you're really concerned you can lengthen the standard warranty with an extended warranty for up to six years or 200,000km: there's no doubt that having a piece of paper with that alongside your owners manual in the glovebox will increase the resale value of your EcoSport (you can transfer the extended warranty). But with the new transmissions we have no reason to expect reliability issues.

Buyers do, however, have access to a capped-price servicing plan for the life of the car, with maintenance due every 12 months or 15,000km, whichever occurs first. The service cost is reasonably well considered, too - over five years/75,000km, the average cost per visit is $281. So, along with a low purchase price, a low maintenance cost gives it an edge over some competitors.

And Ford has that free loan car program, too, where you get to borrow a set of wheels when your car is in the shop.

While the waiting time for Ford EcoSport models is expected to be short, there are plenty of pre-facelift versions still in stock.