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Nissan Pulsar

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Nissan Pulsar Review, For Sale, Models, Specs & News in Australia

The Nissan Pulsar was one of Australia's favourite cars during its heyday through the 1990s, and was even manufactured locally between 1983-93. Australia first saw the Pulsar nameplate attached to the N10 model in 1980 during that awkward phase where Nissan products wore Nissan and Datsun badges at the same time. The N12 generation that replaced it in 1982 started as a Japanese import, but was produced locally from 1983. The 1987 N13 boosted its Australian content by using a Holden-produced engine shared with the Camira, before the 1991 N14 reverted to Nissan mechanicals. The N14 - which included the rally-developed GTI-R that only came to Australia as a grey import - reverted to Japanese manufacture from 1993, which continued with the N15 that arrived in 1995. The 2000 N16 saw hatchback versions sourced from the UK, and both were replaced by the Tiida in 2006. The Pulsar name returned in 2013 with the B17, but sales trickled to halt in 2017 due to competition from the Toyota Corolla and Mazda 3, along with our growing preference for SUVs.

Nissan Pulsar Q&As

Check out real-world situations relating to the Nissan Pulsar here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • What is my 2001 Nissan Pulsar worth?

    Your car is probably still worth around $4000 to $5000 depending on condition and kilometres. The catch is that you won’t be offered that much if you use the car as a trade-in, and the value I’ve quoted would be to sell the car privately, not back to a car dealer. A lack of demand for good used cars is keeping values a little higher (a lot higher in some cases) than they might have been, so even though your car is still worth decent money, you’ll pay a bit extra for whatever you replace it with.

    As far as lifespan goes, that has a lot more to do with maintenance than any other factor. If your car has been serviced by the book, there’s every chance it could last for 200,000 to 250,000km and perhaps even more. But I’ve also seen neglected cars die incredibly young.

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  • Why is my car using too much fuel and stalling?

    Modern engines rely on a raft of sensors to inform the computer of what’s going on under the bonnet and what needs to be adjusted to keep the thing running smoothly and efficiently. A car that is using too much fuel and stalling could be having a problem with the sensor that tells the on-board computer that the engine is up to operating temperature. A cold engine needs more fuel to run properly so, if the sensor is telling the computer that the engine is still cold, the computer will continue to inject extra fuel into it. Of course, if the engine is up to temperature (regardless of what the sensor says) that extra fuel will show up as increased fuel consumption and could easily make the engine stall or run roughly.

    However, that’s just one possibility and with the dozens of sensors dotted around a modern engine, the best advice is to have the car electronically scanned to see what fault codes are thrown up. The good news is that these sensors are usually inexpensive to replace and should return things to spot on pretty much immediately. Other suspects would be oxygen sensors and maybe even the stepper motor which controls the idle speed.

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  • Why don't the gears shift in my 1996 Nissan Pulsar?

    If the gearbox won’t shift gears, then the vehicle won’t be able to accelerate any further once the engine has reached its maximum speed in the gear in which it’s stuck. That’s probably (I’m guessing) why the car feels like it won’t go any faster.

    There are any number of reasons for an automatic gearbox to remain in one gear and refuse to shift. They start with low transmission fluid and go all the way up to a major internal failure or even a computer-related problem. There’s no real way to diagnose these possibilities remotely, so you really need to get the vehicle to somebody who specialises in automatic transmissions and get them to take a close look and diagnose the problem.

    If it’s a major problem with the gearbox, your decision then becomes one of whether the vehicle itself is in good enough condition to warrant spending the money. A major job such as a new transmission and the labour to fit it could easily wind up costing more than the car is worth. Sometimes you’re better off scrapping the vehicle, cutting your losses and moving on to something newer and safer.

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  • Why does the gear stick randomly go into reverse in my 2013 Nissan Pulsar?

    Changing a clutch in any car is a big job and can easily cost the sort of money you’ve been quoted. And when that car is a front-wheel-drive vehicle, there are a lot of things to remove (like the driveshafts) before the gearbox can be removed and the new clutch fitted.

    While I agree that the symptoms you’re reporting do sound like a worn out clutch, I’d like to know what else the mechanic thinks will be wrong. He or she may, for example, be budgeting for the removal and machining of the flywheel as part of the clutch replacement, That can easily add a couple of hundred to the bill. Also, where is the mechanic sourcing the new clutch? You may have found a replacement kit online for the $500 you’re quoting, but is it a quality part from a reputable brand or a no-name piece of rubbish from an internet clearing house?

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See All Nissan Pulsar Q&As
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

Nissan Pulsar Models Price and Specs

The price range for the Nissan Pulsar varies based on the trim level you choose. Starting at $9,500 and going to $21,010 for the latest year the model was manufactured. The model range is available in the following body types starting from the engine/transmission specs shown below.

Year Body Type Specs Price from Price to
2018 Sedan 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $9,500 $20,900
2018 Hatchback 1.8L, ULP, CVT AUTO $10,500 $21,010
2017 Sedan 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $8,400 $19,030
2017 Hatchback 1.8L, ULP, CVT AUTO $9,300 $19,140
2016 Sedan 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $7,700 $17,380
2016 Hatchback 1.8L, ULP, CVT AUTO $8,200 $17,490
2015 Sedan 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $7,000 $16,390
2015 Hatchback 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $7,100 $20,130
2014 Hatchback 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $6,700 $18,810
2014 Sedan 1.8L, ULP, 6 SP MAN $7,000 $15,290
See All Nissan Pulsar Pricing and Specs

Nissan Pulsar Fuel Consumption

The Nissan Pulsar is available in a number of variants and body types that are powered by ULP and PULP fuel type(s). It has an estimated fuel consumption starting from 7.2L/100km for Hatchback /ULP for the latest year the model was manufactured.

Year Body Type Fuel Consumption* Engine Fuel Type Transmission
2018 Hatchback 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2018 Hatchback 7.7L/100km 1.6L PULP 6 SP MAN
2018 Sedan 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2017 Hatchback 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2017 Hatchback 7.7L/100km 1.6L PULP 6 SP MAN
2017 Sedan 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2016 Hatchback 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2016 Hatchback 7.7L/100km 1.6L PULP 6 SP MAN
2016 Sedan 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2015 Hatchback 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2015 Hatchback 7.7L/100km 1.6L PULP 6 SP MAN
2015 Sedan 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2014 Hatchback 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
2014 Hatchback 7.7L/100km 1.6L PULP 6 SP MAN
2014 Sedan 7.2L/100km 1.8L ULP 6 SP MAN
* Combined fuel consumption See All Nissan Pulsar Pricing and Specs for 2018

Nissan Pulsar Dimensions

The dimensions of the Nissan Pulsar Sedan and Hatchback vary according to year of manufacture and spec level.

Year Body Type Height x Width x Length Ground Clearance
2018 Sedan 1520x1760x4610 mm 160 mm
2018 Hatchback 1520x1760x4295 mm 137 mm
2017 Hatchback 1520x1760x4295 mm 137 mm
2017 Sedan 1520x1760x4610 mm 160 mm
2016 Sedan 1520x1760x4610 mm 160 mm
2016 Hatchback 1520x1760x4295 mm 137 mm
2015 Hatchback 1520x1760x4295 mm 137 mm
2015 Sedan 1520x1760x4610 mm 160 mm
2014 Sedan 1520x1760x4610 mm 160 mm
2014 Hatchback 1520x1760x4295 mm 137 mm
The dimensions shown above are for the base model. See All Nissan Pulsar Dimensions

Nissan Pulsar Wheel Size

The Nissan Pulsar has a number of different wheel and tyre options. When it comes to tyres, these range from 195x60 R16 for Hatchback in 2018 with a wheel size that spans from 16x6.5 inches.

Year Body Type Front Tyre Size Front Rim Rear Tyre Size Rear Rim
2018 Hatchback 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2018 Sedan 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2017 Hatchback 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2017 Sedan 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2016 Hatchback 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2016 Sedan 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2015 Hatchback 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2015 Sedan 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2014 Hatchback 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
2014 Sedan 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches 195x60 R16 16x6.5 inches
The dimensions shown above are for the base model. See All Nissan Pulsar Wheel Sizes

Nissan Pulsar Towing Capacity

The Nissan Pulsar has maximum towing capacity of 1200kg for the latest model available.

Year Body Type Braked Capacity from Braked Capacity to
2018 Hatchback 1100kg 1200kg
2018 Sedan 1100kg 1200kg
2017 Hatchback 1100kg 1200kg
2017 Sedan 1100kg 1200kg
2016 Hatchback 1100kg 1200kg
2016 Sedan 1100kg 1200kg
2015 Hatchback 1100kg 1200kg
2015 Sedan 1100kg 1200kg
2014 Hatchback 1100kg 1200kg
2014 Sedan 1100kg 1200kg
See All Towing Capacity for Nissan Pulsar