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Mitsubishi Triton review: Expert review of the new 2020 Triton

If you can do without some of the bells and whistles, the GLX+ is a great truck for work or play.
EXPERT RATING
8
The Mitsubishi Triton 2020 model range has been mildly revised following the launch of the facelifted version in 2019. Since it debuted it has rocketed up the sales charts, and it’s now consistently the third-most popular ute in Australia behind the Toyota HiLux and Ford Ranger.

The Mitsubishi Triton 2020 model range has been mildly revised following the launch of the facelifted version in 2019. Since it debuted it has rocketed up the sales charts, and it’s now consistently the third-most popular ute in Australia behind the Toyota HiLux and Ford Ranger. Like most pick-ups, the Triton is built in Thailand. 

While the Triton has been around for about 40 years in Australia, the ute segment is as popular now as it ever has been - so competition is rife in this part of the market. 

For this 2020 Triton review we’ve gone for a more affordable version of the Triton, the GLX+, but we still have it in the most popular mechanical variation of the Triton - a four-wheel drive diesel auto.

And if you can do without some of the bells and whistles, it’s a great truck for work or play. 

New model

The model year 2020 Triton range was released in October 2019, just eight months after the new Triton launched in Australia.

You may have read that 2019 MR Mitsubishi Triton review and thought the company had done a good job, especially if you’d had a look at our MQ Triton review - the predecessor was showing and feeling its age.

The model year 2020 Triton range was released in October 2019, just eight months after the new Triton launched in Australia. The model year 2020 Triton range was released in October 2019, just eight months after the new Triton launched in Australia.

For this the brand says it has added extra power and capability to the mid-range models, because they have proven most popular with private and fleet buyers. The changes have apparently been made to “improve comfort and convenience”. 

The company also said that customer feedback was critical to the 2020 model year updates for the Triton range, as the brand is “consistently listening to ute buyers and looking for new ways to add the features they want to our line-up”.

In the GLX+ model, for instance, the revised version gets a rear differential lock (previously not available), as well as a revised interpretation of the Easy Select 4WD system, that allows the rear diff to be locked in 4H and 4L modes. The rear diff lock is now also on GLS, too - it was previously only fitted to the GLS Premium top-spec model.

The GLX+ has selectable four-wheel drive, with 2H, 4H (high range) and 4L (low range). The GLX+ has selectable four-wheel drive, with 2H, 4H (high range) and 4L (low range).

In a marketplace where standing still is a sin, the Triton certainly sees an element of value-adding, despite the fact the brand still lacks a flagship model to rival the likes of the HiLux Rugged X, Ranger Raptor and Navara N-Trek Warrior.

If you want to know more about the entire range, be sure to read our Mitsubishi Triton 2020 review off the back of the launch, which covers all the models in detail. 

Features & accessories

If you’re wondering where the GLX+ sits in the range, well, it’s just above the GLX, funnily enough. But confusingly there’s also a GLX ADAS above the GLX. Read our detailed range review for a breakdown of how all those models compare, but here’s what you need to know about the GLX+.

Standard features include a 7.0-inch touchscreen multimedia screen with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and GPS location, but there is no built-in sat nav. The sound system has four speakers. The GLX+ has cloth seats (no leather here, apart from the steering wheel), a plastic steering wheel and shift knob, and if you want tinted windows from the factory you’ll have to opt for the GLS or GLS Premium.

  • Inside are cloth seats, along with a plastic steering wheel and shift knob. Inside are cloth seats, along with a plastic steering wheel and shift knob.
  • Standard features include a 7.0-inch touchscreen multimedia screen. Standard features include a 7.0-inch touchscreen multimedia screen.
  • The GLX+ Double Cab has a five seat layout. The GLX+ Double Cab has a five seat layout.

There's two cupholders up front, and the Double Cab gets another two in the back seat's centre armrest. There's also bottle holders in every door across the range.

The GLX+ also scores a rear diff lock, rear air circulator and single zone climate control and side steps. You don’t find a sunroof here, nor a power tailgate - in fact, you won’t find that on any of the trim levels of Triton.

Safety equipment includes auto emergency braking (AEB), which works at high and low speeds. It also has lane assist/lane departure warning, a reversing camera, rear parking sensors, dual ISOFIX and top tether points in the dual-cab model (but none in the Club Cab).

You need to go for a GLS or GLS Premium model if you want hill descent control, or if you think you need a blind spot monitor system. There are other features the top-spec versions get, but you can read our range review for that info. 

The GLX+ comes with lane assist/lane departure warning. The GLX+ comes with lane assist/lane departure warning.

No matter the spec, all models have dual front, front side, full-length curtain and driver’s knee airbag coverage. The MQ Triton scored a five-star ANCAP crash test rating in 2015, and that score still applies to the MR model you see here.

So the GLX+ is missing some of the nice bits you might wish you had, but it doesn’t lack anything you need if you’re buying a dual cab ute for work and play. That makes it our sweet spot in the range.

Colours available for the Triton range include the obvious ones - white ($0), black ($690), grey ($690) and silver ($690) - and there’s also blue ($690) and red ($0). You’ll need to buy a Ranger or Colorado if you want orange. 

There are multiple accessories you can add to your Triton, including a choice of four different bull bar setups (from $3312 to $3984), two nudge bars ($1083), two sports bars (from $1221), an LED light bar ($695), a snorkel ($928), and the usual array of plastic protection such as a bonnet protector, headlight protectors and weather shields. Lower grade models can be up-specced to 18-inch alloy rims and tyres ($1740), and there’s a chrome finish for the lower doors available, too ($570). 

Lower grade models can be up-specced to 18-inch alloy rims, however our test car was fitted with 16-inch wheels. Lower grade models can be up-specced to 18-inch alloy rims, however our test car was fitted with 16-inch wheels.

Of course you can also get a set of rubber mats or carpet mats, and there’s a huge selection of canopy options tonneau covers (hard top and soft cover), a tub liner, tow bar kit, roof rack cross bars, a luggage basket, and - of course - you can also option a Mitsubishi tray if you prefer to remove the tub. 

And if you prefer to shop aftermarket parts, there are dozens of suspension upgrades, body add-ons, lift kits and lighting setups available through the likes of ARB. 

Price

How much is a Triton GLX+? Well, that depends on the version you choose, because there are three different takes on this theme. 

You can get the GLX+ Club Cab cab chassis diesel auto for $41,490 plus on-road costs. If an extra cab isn’t your style, then the Double Cab Pick Up could be more for you. You can get the manual version for $40,990 plus on-roads, and the automatic version this new Triton review is based on has a list price of $43,490 (plus on-road costs).

However, the RRP can differ greatly compared to actual cost - in Mitsubishi’s case, often in favour of the customer. There are drive away price deals to be done when it comes to Tritons - check out Autotrader for the latest new car deals or, if you prefer, you will no doubt find a great second hand price.

Problems

You can read about some reported Mitsubishi Triton problems if you have concerns. And if any other common issues crop up, there's a good chance you'll find them on our Mitsubishi Triton problems page.

There were a few recalls for the MQ model that preceded this model, including a couple of recalls for the towbar, one for the soft tonneau cover and one for the side steps. 

Obviously reliability is important, and in round terms, there seemingly aren’t many major issues around the engine, transmission, automatic gearbox problems, clutch problems or suspension components issues for the Triton.

Specifications

The engine specs for the Triton are decent by class standards, but not at the pointy end in terms of ratings in comparison to the best four-cylinder diesel engines out there.

For example, the Triton GLX+ is only available with a 2.4-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine. It produces 133kW of power (at 3500rpm) and 430Nm of torque (at 2500rpm), which is okay for the class but not a benchmark setter. Consider that vs the outputs of the Ford Ranger twin-turbo with 157kW and 500Nm, and the Triton looks a little underdone. 

It uses a six-speed automatic, but there’s a six-speed manual if you want it. The GLX+ has selectable four-wheel drive, with 2H, 4H (high range) and 4L (low range). Wondering about its 0-100 time? Depends how much weight you’ve got in it, but don’t bank on breaking the 10-second barrier.

The Triton GLX+ coems with a 2.4-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel making 133kW/430Nm. The Triton GLX+ coems with a 2.4-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel making 133kW/430Nm.

There are lower-spec models in the range that run a petrol engine, but you can’t get a dual cab 4x4 in petrol. 

Fuel consumption is claimed at 7.9 litres per 100 kilometres for the manual model, and 8.6L/100km for the automatic. Expect to see 10-11L/100km in real-world driving, and a bit higher if you’re a lead-foot or if you often run heavily laden. 

You might be wondering about payload levels for GLX+ models - and they’re decent. The Club Cab is rated at 970kg, while Double Cab models are pegged at 945kg for manual and auto models. Gross combination mass (GCM) is 5785kg for Club Cab and 5885kg for Double Cab models.

Towing & off-road

The Mitsubishi Triton handles itself quite well when it comes to our off road review element. It doesn’t feel quite as complete or hardcore as our pick of the tough trucks, the Toyota HiLux, but it holds its own in the 4x4 stakes. 

It has simple to use 4WD system with 2H, 4H and 4L options for its transfer case, but unlike the high-grade models with Super-Select 4WD-II, you shouldn’t leave it in 4H on sealed roads for that AWD feel. But you can switch between 2H and 4H at seeds below 100km/h. 

Some of the figures you’ll no doubt want to know for the GLX+ are: ground clearance - 205mm; approach angle - 30 degrees; ramp-over/break-over angle - 25 degrees (24deg for Club Cab); departure angle - 22 degrees.

The Mitsubishi Triton handles itself quite well when it comes to our off road review element. The Mitsubishi Triton handles itself quite well when it comes to our off road review element.

Bear in mind that if you add the 18-inch wheels and tyres, or buy a GLS or GLS Premium which come with 18s as standard, you get improved ground clearance (220mm), approach (31deg) and departure (23deg) angles.

If you need the benchmark level towing capacity - which in this segment is 3500 kilograms - you will need to shop elsewhere. The Triton maxes out at a top braked towing capacity of 3100kg for four-wheel drive dual-cab models. The Club Cab is rated at a max of 3000kg.

No model in the range comes with a towbar fitted as standard. You’ll need to fit one. And we’ve found in previous tests that the Triton can feel twitchy when towing - that could partly come down to its light-by-class-standards kerb weight, which tops out at just 2055kg (a top-spec Ranger weighs almost 400kg more, which certainly helps with stability.

Tray & storage space

If you want the ultimate in ute usability, you need a single cab. If you choose a cab chassis, you’ll be able to fit a longer, flatter, wider and more usable tray. Pick a pick-up, and you’re instantly hampered by the size and tray dimensions. 

One of the most intriguing choices in the ute market is the Club Cab or extra cab/space cab. It offers four seats (or a decent undercover boot space, if you don’t need rear seats - hey, it works for luggage, expensive tools, anything you don’t want damaged or stolen or in the weather!). 

The tub dimensions for the Club Cab come with a size advantage, measuring 1850mm long, 1470mm wide (1085mm between wheel arches) and 475mm deep.

In Double Cab form, the length of the tub is 1520mm, while the width is 1470mm and depth is 475mm. In Double Cab form, the length of the tub is 1520mm, while the width is 1470mm and depth is 475mm.

If you need the ultimate in interior space, you need a Double Cab. Of course you get five seats and child seat anchor points, and the rear seat can be folded down if you need hide things away from prying eyes. 

But the dimensions of the tray are hampered compared to the Club Cab. The length of the tub is 1520mm, while the width and depth are the same. 

The rear seat can be folded down if you need to hide things. The rear seat can be folded down if you need to hide things.

Warranty

The Mitsubishi Triton 2020 model comes with a seven-year/150,000km warranty plan. Or at least it did at the time this story was published. The company has continually increased the duration of this promotional warranty plan since launch, and it now spans to 31 December, 2019. 

The brand’s capped price servicing plan is attractively priced, with maintenance intervals of 12 months/15,000km, set at $299 per visit for the first three years/45,000km. 

Mitsubishi backs its new cars with a 12-month roadside assist plan initially, but that will roll-over to as long as four years if you service your car at an authorised workshop.

The competition

So how does the Triton compare to its main competitors? As the most budget-friendly mainstream-branded ute, there’s a lot of compelling reasons to choose it over other models at the cut-price end of the segment.

You might want to consider how the GLX+ stacks up against a SsangYong Musso Ultimate or LDV T60 Trailrider. Those two have more creature comforts, but the resale value may not be as strong.

In terms of other mainstream rivals, you can get deals on the Isuzu D-Max and Holden Colorado at close to the price of the Triton GLX+ in similar spec, but the Mitsubishi is still the value king of that group. 

Extras

Aside from the extensive array of accessories buyers can fit to their Triton, there aren’t any optional extras to choose. So, if you buy the GLX+, you can’t option extra stuff like leather trim or electric seats - you’ll just have to step up to a higher model.

Conclusion & ratings

The Mitsubishi Triton GLX+ is a solid option for tradies who need a ute that’ll double as a family runaround. It has good safety gear, is a solid value proposition, and while it mightn’t be as plush or comfortable as higher grades in the line-up, it’s hard to argue against this variant being anything other than the sweet spot if you still need your ute to be capable of hard work. 

Pricing Guides

$37,490
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)
Lowest Price
$22,490
Highest Price
$52,490
EXPERT RATING
8
Matt Campbell
Senior Editor

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Pricing Guide

$40,990

Lowest price, based on new car retail price

This price is subject to change closer to release data
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