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LDV T60

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LDV T60 Australia

The LDV T60 is a Chinese ute which first arrived in Australia in October 2017.

Originally a European marque (known as Leyland DAF Vans), LDV now belongs to Chinese conglomerate, SAIC. The brand clearly has its sights aimed at the big ute players in Australia with keen pricing, five-star safety and relatively high spec levels.

Pricing currently starts from $41,042 for the T60 MAX PRO (4X4) with the most expensive T60 coming in at $49,463 for the T60 Mega TUB (4X4).

At launch, the T60 was available in just two dual-cab variants, the Pro and Luxe, available in either auto or manual and were 4x4 only.

A single-cab variant was added in 2018 available in two- or four-wheel drive, with all variants powered by the same 2.8-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel.

LDV T60 Q&As

Check out real-world situations relating to the LDV T60 here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • The diesel engine in my 2023 LDV T60 Max is dropping revs

    Assuming there's nothing wrong with the engine causing it to lose power under load, this sounds like a case of the conditions causing the engine to struggle. Soft sand has a lot of friction and this literally grabs the tyres, causing the engine to load up and revs to fall. It's like a big, invisible hand grabbing the wheel and stopping it from turning freely. As you apply more power to counter this, the engine revs up, the wheels spin and the vehicle sinks even further into the sand and the cycle starts over again. Some cars with sensitive throttles are more prone this.

    Experienced sand drivers know that the solution to this is to make the vehicle 'float' over the sand, rather than bulldoze through it. The best way to do that is to lower your tyre pressures. This allows the tread to 'bag out' and produce a larger footprint. And a bigger tread surface means more chance of staying on top of the sand rather than buried in it. It sounds simple but it really does work. Think of it as the difference between standing on thin ice in a pair of flat shoes versus stilettos.

    How much pressure should you drop. We'd go from the usual on-road tyre pressures to about 18psi as a first step and then 15psi if the conditions are still causing problems. In extreme cases, you can go right down to 12 or even 10psi provided you're careful and keep your speed down. Don't forget to re-inflate the tyres once you're back on the bitumen.

    Beyond that, if the problem is engine related, then a scan at your dealership should throw up a code to guide the mechanic on what's wrong. The vehicle is under warranty, so don't be backward in coming forward.

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  • With my 2019 LDV T60, I am getting very close to red in temperatures when towing a camper up any long hills. Do you think a different coolant or is a better fan needed?

    Coolants are pretty specific these days, and straying from the exact one the car’s manufacturer specifies can be asking for trouble. But the fact that the temperature settles a little when you travel more slowly and shift to a lower gear suggests that the whole cooling system is getting towards the limit of its capacity when you’re towing a big load uphill.

    Going slower and using a lower gear all takes stress off the engine and, therefore, its cooling system. By using a lower gear, you’re effectively making the engine turn over a little faster which means both the coolant pump and the cooling fan (if it’s a belt-driven one) will both turn a little faster. That’s good for cooling. A lower gear also means you can maintain your speed with a little less throttle which means less fuel going into the engine and therefore less heat generated.

    In the meantime, you can check things like the tension of the fan-belt and make sure that the coolant system doesn’t have any air trapped in it which can lead to overheating. Check, too, the condition of the coolant hoses, that the electric fan is cutting in when it should, there’s no debris blocking the radiator and that the radiator cap is holding pressure.

    There’s another old-school trick that might make a difference next time: When the temperature starts to rise on the gauge, turn the car’s heater on full blast. This will make things a little toasty in the cabin, but it also means the coolant is now also passing through the heater core which, fundamentally, is an extra radiator.

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  • Why won't my LDV T60's display screen work?

    Problems with the electronics appear to be the biggest source of grief for LDV owners. Many complain that the vehicle’s on-board infotainment system appears to be fundamentally incompatible with Android phones and that the Bluetooth function generally just doesn’t work as it should. Many LDVs also seem to have developed the annoying habit of ratcheting their stereo’s volume to full every time the car is started. The blind-spot warning system seems prone to offering false alarms and the reverse camera has been widely panned for it’s low-resolution image. About the only way to fix these issues is to replace the factory system with an aftermarket head unit…not what you’d expect from a modern vehicle.

    Of course, given that the LDV T60 was launched in late 2017 with a five-year warranty, the oldest of them can now only be coming up for their fourth birthday. Which means that provided the vehicle has been serviced correctly and you haven’t driven it more than 130,000km, you’re covered by that warranty. Which seems to us, that it’s LDV’s problem to sort something out by either fixing the standard infotainment system or sourcing and fitting an aftermarket one that actually works. Contact LDV’s Australian customer service department and make sure your complaint is logged on the factory system.

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  • Hi, My LDV T60 ute's display screen is not working, All other functions are good. Any idea?

    Problems with the electronics appear to be the biggest source of grief for LDV owners. Many complain that the vehicle's on-board infotainment system appears to be fundamentally incompatible with Android phones and that the Bluetooth function generally just doesn't work as it should. Many LDVs also seem to have developed the annoying habit of ratcheting their stereo's volume to full every time the car is started. The blind-spot warning system seems prone to offering false alarms and the reverse camera has been widely panned for it's low-resolution image. About the only way to fix these issues is to replace the factory system with an aftermarket head unit…not what you'd expect from a modern vehicle.

    Of course, given that the LDV T60 was launched in late 2017 with a five-year warranty, the oldest of them can now only be coming up for their fourth birthday. Which means that provided the vehicle has been serviced correctly and you haven't driven it more than 130,000km, you're covered by that warranty. Which seems to us, that it's LDV's problem to sort something out by either fixing the standard infotainment system or sourcing and fitting an aftermarket one that actually works. Contact LDV's Australian customer service department and make sure your complaint is logged on the factory system.

    Show more
See All LDV T60 Q&As
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

LDV T60 Accessories

LDV Automotive offers a range of accessories including light bar, rubber floor mats, polished alloy nudge bars, sports bar, tow bar, ladder rack, colour-matched canopies, tonneau covers (soft and hard), as well as black pack (nudge bar, side steps, and sports bar) and more. 

Shown above are the accessory details for the LDV T60 2022.

LDV T60 Interior

The interior of the LDV T60 is nice, neat and tidy, well put-together and easy to spend time in.

The Pro leans more towards the working life (durable cloth and tough plastic surfaces), whereas the Luxe has more of a prestige feel to it (albeit on a budget).

Shown above are interior details for the LDV T60 2022.

LDV T60 Models Price and Specs

The price range for the LDV T60 varies based on the trim level you choose. Starting at $41,042 and going to $49,463 for the latest year the model was manufactured. The model range is available in the following body types starting from the engine/transmission specs shown below.

Year Body Type Specs Price from Price to
2024 Ute 2.0L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $41,042 $49,463
2023 Ute 2.0L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $37,950 $53,790
2022 Ute 2.8L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $26,510 $50,710
2021 Ute 2.8L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $23,210 $43,340
2020 Ute 2.8L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $20,900 $40,040
See All LDV T60 Pricing and Specs

LDV T60 Colours

The LDV T60 is available in 'Metal Black', 'Jewel Blue', 'Lava Grey', 'Agate Red' and 'Blanc White.' 

  • Metal Black
  • Jewel Blue
  • Lava Grey
  • Agate Red
  • Blanc White
To confirm current colour availability, please check the manufacturer's website. Shown above are the colours for the LDV T60 2022.

LDV T60 Towing Capacity

The LDV T60 has maximum towing capacity of 3000kg for the latest model available.

Year Body Type Braked Capacity from Braked Capacity to
2024 Ute 3000kg 3000kg
2023 Ute 3000kg 3000kg
2022 Ute 3000kg 3000kg
2021 Ute 3000kg 3000kg
2020 Ute 3000kg 3000kg
See All Towing Capacity for LDV T60

LDV T60 Dimensions

The dimensions of the LDV T60 Ute vary according to year of manufacture and spec level.

Year Body Type Height x Width x Length Ground Clearance
2024 Ute 1809x1900x5365 mm 215 mm
2023 Ute 1809x1900x5365 mm 215 mm
2022 Ute 1840x1900x5365 mm 215 mm
2021 Ute 1840x1900x5365 mm 215 mm
2020 Ute 1809x1900x0 mm 215 mm
The dimensions shown above are for the base model. See All LDV T60 Dimensions

LDV T60 Wheel Size

The LDV T60 has a number of different wheel and tyre options. When it comes to tyres, these range from 245x65 R17 for Ute in 2024.

Year Body Type Front Tyre Size Front Rim Rear Tyre Size Rear Rim
2024 Ute 245x65 R17 245x65 R17
2023 Ute 245x65 R17 245x65 R17
2022 Ute 245x65 R17 245x65 R17
2021 Ute 245x65 R17 245x65 R17
2020 Ute 245x70 R16 16x7 inches 245x70 R16 16x7 inches
The dimensions shown above are for the base model. See All LDV T60 Wheel Sizes

LDV T60 Fuel Consumption

The LDV T60 is available in a number of variants and body types that are powered by Diesel fuel type(s). It has an estimated fuel consumption starting from 9.2L/100km for Ute /Diesel for the latest year the model was manufactured.

Year Body Type Fuel Consumption* Engine Fuel Type Transmission
2024 Ute 9.2L/100km 2.0L Diesel 6 SP MAN
2023 Ute 9.2L/100km 2.0L Diesel 6 SP MAN
2022 Ute 8.8L/100km 2.8L Diesel 6 SP MAN
2021 Ute 8.8L/100km 2.8L Diesel 6 SP MAN
2020 Ute 8.8L/100km 2.8L Diesel 6 SP MAN
* Combined fuel consumption See All LDV T60 Pricing and Specs for 2024

LDV T60 Seats

The ute’s standard features in Pro form include cloth seats. The top-spec Luxe gets leather seats with the fronts six-way electrically adjustable and heated.

LDV T60 Seats
Shown above are seat details for the LDV T60 2022.

LDV T60 Speed

The MY20 LDV T60 Luxe (auto) has the power to sprint from 0-100km/h in just under 13 seconds.

Shown above are speed details for the LDV T60 2022.