Mitsubishi Triton Problems

No car is perfect, but we've gathered everything relating to the Mitsubishi Triton reliability here to help you decide if it's a smart buy.

What should I do if my 2011 Mitsubishi Triton makes a grinding noise when changing gears?

Answered by CarsGuide 23 Oct 2021

Mitsubishi’s manual gearboxes from around this time (and earlier) were some of the noisiest around. But usually it wasn’t anything to be concerned about. Bearing rumble and some clutch bearing noise were pretty much par for the course, but your problem sounds more like it’s associated with the gearbox’s synchromesh rings. These rings are designed to allow the gearbox to slip between ratios smoothly and silently, and any crunching noises during shifts can often be traced to worn synchromesh parts.

The good news is you won’t harm the transmission by continuing to drive it, particularly if you’re careful and take your time with the shifts you know are most likely to create a crunch. If you can live with that, fine. If not, the gearbox will need to be removed from the car and rebuilt. That will be neither cheap nor simple.

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What is causing my 2019 Mitsubishi Triton to have DPF issues?

Answered by CarsGuide 17 Sep 2021

Since both the Triton and Pajero Sport boast exactly the same power and torque outputs, I doubt whether there’s a huge difference (if any at all) in the mapping of either engine. Which suggests that switching from one to the other without changing your driving patterns would be a very good way of reproducing the Triton’s DPF problems in a Pajero Sport. My suspicion is that you’re having to force multiple DPF regenerations because your driving habits don’t let the engine get up to the correct temperature often enough to allow the vehicle to conduct its own, automatic regeneration. This is a pretty common problem with modern turbo-diesels and it’s not a criticism of your driving, simply a confirmation that these modern diesel engines don’t like short trips. Then again, 24,000km in 12 months doesn’t sound like the vehicle is used solely for the school run.

Six regenerations in 24,000km sounds like an awful lot, also, so I’d be more concerned that your dealer is underplaying the situation to avoid dealing with a problem in your specific vehicle. Has the vehicle been electronically scanned? Perhaps this might show up a dud sensor or other problem that’s making the computer think it needs another regeneration. We’ve heard of a faulty temperature sensor on this model Triton that can lead the DPF to offer up a false alarm that it’s ready for a regeneration. That could explain the high number of regenerations the vehicle has demanded. Again, a scan might tell the full story.

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How do I add a leaf spring to the suspension of my 2010 Mitsubishi Triton?

Answered by CarsGuide 23 Aug 2021

The short answer is that this can be done, and, in fact, there are kits available to allow you to add a leaf to a suspension spring-pack. The broad idea is to make the spring stiffer, increasing theoretical load-carrying ability as well as giving more ground clearance (as the modified spring will usually make the vehicle sit higher).

The trick is finding the correct extra-leaf kit for your specific vehicle, and this is where a specialist supplier comes in. The kit should include the extra two spring leaves as well as longer centre bolts (as the spring-pack is now thicker). And as with any suspension -related equipment, quality is hugely important to safety and the actual performance of the new set-up.

But there are other issues. The first is a legal one. While the new, thicker spring-pack might tempt you to increase the loads you carry, legally, the vehicle retains its original loading and towing limits until it has been certified otherwise by an accredited engineer. Some kits are supplied with this paperwork all sorted for you ready to simply lodge with the authorities, but some aren’t. And consulting engineers don’t generally come cheap. You would also need to inform your insurance provider of the change to the vehicle’s specification. There are also absolute limits to how much higher your vehicle can sit compared with a standard one. This varies from state to state, but in your home state of NSW at the moment, a vehicle can legally be raised by 75mm over its standard ride height. The catch is that only 50mm of this can be from suspension modifications, and the other 25mm of lift through bigger tyres. But if you stick within those limits and don’t intend to increase the vehicle’s load or towing ability, then the raised suspension doesn’t need to be certified by an engineer for the vehicle to remain legal.

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What's the better buy, Pajero Sport Exceed or Toyota Fortuner Crusade?

Answered by CarsGuide 21 Aug 2021

These two vehicles share a lot of traits both in terms of their engineering and their target market. Both are aimed at the high-end of the mid-sized off-road station-wagon market and both do a pretty good job of offering lots of off-road ability along with the sort of luxury and convenience that many families want. In the case of design and engineering they are both based on utilities (the Mitsubishi Triton and Toyota HiLux respectively) and share the drivelines and front structure with those utes. To make them work as passenger rather than load-carrying vehicles, both the Pajero Sport and Fortuner do away with the utilities’ leaf-sprung rear axle and replace it a coil-sprung unit for greatly enhanced comfort.

Both vehicles have had their niggling reliability problems, mainly to do with DPF and some EGR problems, but overall, they’re both now old enough for the majority of the bugs to have been ironed out. Perhaps the biggest packaging difference is that the Pajero Sport is a good deal narrower across the cabin than the Toyota, and that matters for families with bigger kids. Both vehicles were facelifted late last year with new tech and mechanical and performance improvements. Both also have seven seats as standard.

The Mitsubishi is about $4000 cheaper based on RRP than the Toyota, but the final price can vary from dealer to dealer and what state you live in. The best advice is to try each one on for size and maybe even throw in contenders like the Ford Everest as a direct comparison.

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What 4WD should I buy for towing?

Answered by CarsGuide 23 Jul 2021

To get a vehicle with meaningful (as opposed to a theoretical) towing ability of 2.5 tonnes, you really need to shop for a relatively late-model dual-cab 4X4 ute. The reason for that is that many vehicles that claim a 2.5-tonne limit in the brochure fail to explain that there’s also a Gross Vehicle Combination Mass in play and, by the time you’ve added passengers, gear and a full tank of fuel to the towing vehicle, there might not be much of that GCM to devote to a towed load.

Going for a vehicle with 3000kg or even 35000kg towing capacity in the first place is a good way to ensure you do accidentally start driving around in an overloaded vehicle with all the legal and insurance connotations that involves.

A lot of the current shape dual-cab utes fall within your budget on a second-hand basis, but there are caveats. Make sure you only buy a ute with a full service history. Some of these vehicles were worked hard by their original owners, so be very careful before handing over the cash. Avoid ex-mine fleet vehicles and don’t be afraid to buy a base-model vehicle if it offers better value. Even a single-cab version of these utes will be a lot cheaper than the dual-cab and, if you don’t need the rear seat, are often a more practical solution. Makes and models include the Ford Ranger, Toyota HiLux, Mazda BT50, Mitsubishi Triton and Isuzu D-Max. For real value for money, vehicles like the Ssangyong Musso can tow 3.5 tonnes, are well equipped and can be had for less than $35,000 drive-away, brand-new. That also gets you a seven-year factory warranty. All of these options are available with the automatic transmission you want and, indeed, this is the best option for a tow vehicle.

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What is the towing capacity of the Mitsubishi Triton?

Answered by CarsGuide 27 May 2021

According to my specifications, the MK Triton, depending on its specification (engine type, body layout and drive system) has a towing capacity (of a braked trailer) of between 1500kg and 2200kg. At the lower end of that, your caravan when fully loaded would exceed that limit. Older utes like the MK Triton also – generally – have smaller payload and towing ratings than their newer relatives, but it’s also important to take into account the Gross Combination Mass limit which amounts to the total weight of the vehicle and whatever it’s towing. Again, in some cases, the Triton has a low GVM limit of just 4010kg which, even with your caravan at its lightest (unladen) would take your combination very close to that limit. At that point you also need to consider what you carry, including all your gear and even the weight of passengers on board. Fill the fuel tank or the van’s water tank and you could be in legal trouble if anything goes wrong. A visit to a weighbridge (some council tips have them) might be a good idea to see how close to the edge you really are.

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Why does the speedo in my 2004 Mitsubishi Triton bounce up and down and make a weird noise?

Answered by CarsGuide 8 Feb 2021

The cable that drives the speedometer is a likely candidate for this in some cars, Aaron, but mainly older ones than your Triton. The cable will eventually run out of lubricant, at which point it can bind up and won’t turn smoothly (the cause of the hyperactive needle) while also making a dry squawking noise (the budgies). But, from memory, your car has an electronically-driven speedo, so the cause is more likely that the speedometer itself is worn out and causing internal friction (for the same set of symptoms).

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What can I do about the red paint on my 2016 Mitsubishi Triton fading?

Answered by CarsGuide 16 Dec 2020

I spoke to Mitsubishi Australia who told me that paint fade is not a common complaint among their customers. There is the possibility that your car could be covered by warranty, but that will all depend on the circumstances of that individual vehicle. That’s not as simple as it having been exposed to high temperatures or UV radiation on a regular basis, either; the car’s entire history will be taken into account including whether it has ever been treated with an aftermarket paint treatment or has had body repairs at any stage.

Mitsubishi’s advice, then, is to take the vehicle to your nearest dealership and have the car examined to assess what the situation is. If that doesn’t satisfy you, you can also contact Mitsubishi Australia’s customer service division to discuss the issue.

For the record, shades of red are historically the worst offenders when it comes to fading and paint degradation. Paint technology has come a long way, but it remains that red pigments do not appreciate Australian levels of heat and UV radiation. In some cases, the original colour of the vehicle can be restored without resorting to repainting and this process can take many forms.

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Are there known problems with 2015 Mitsubishi Triton's intercooler pipes/hoses?

Answered by CarsGuide 30 Sep 2020

The MQ Triton doesn’t seem any better or worse than its rivals in this department. But, like other makes and models, there’s a healthy aftermarket supply of replacement intercoolers and the pipework that feeds them, so it’s definitely not an unknown problem.

But your experience is exceptional. Were all five vehicles bought brand-new at the same time? If so, they’re all likely to be from the same production run which could explain a faulty batch of hoses.

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What is causing my Mitsubishi Triton GLX auto to shudder?

Answered by CarsGuide 11 Sep 2020

When you say the suspension has been upgraded, did that, by any chance, involve raising the ride height? Problems centring around shuddering and vibrations, vague steering and the vehicle generally having a mind of its own are very common among owners who have paid good money to have the suspension hiked by anything from two to six inches.

Aside from the legal and insurance implications of this, raising these vehicles can throw the wheel-alignment settings (particularly the caster angle) out of whack and lead to the problems you’re experiencing. There are fixes including eccentric suspension bushes to return the angles back to normal, but it’s a specialist job.

Beyond that, a vibration at a particular speed can often be traced back to wheel balancing. The wheel and tyre combination on these vehicles is quite heavy, so making sure all the balance-weights are where they should be is critical.

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