Mitsubishi Triton Problems

No car is perfect, but we've gathered everything relating to the Mitsubishi Triton reliability here to help you decide if it's a smart buy.

Why does the speedo in my 2004 Mitsubishi Triton bounce up and down and make a weird noise?

Answered by CarsGuide 8 Feb 2021

The cable that drives the speedometer is a likely candidate for this in some cars, Aaron, but mainly older ones than your Triton. The cable will eventually run out of lubricant, at which point it can bind up and won’t turn smoothly (the cause of the hyperactive needle) while also making a dry squawking noise (the budgies). But, from memory, your car has an electronically-driven speedo, so the cause is more likely that the speedometer itself is worn out and causing internal friction (for the same set of symptoms).

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What can I do about the red paint on my 2016 Mitsubishi Triton fading?

Answered by CarsGuide 16 Dec 2020

I spoke to Mitsubishi Australia who told me that paint fade is not a common complaint among their customers. There is the possibility that your car could be covered by warranty, but that will all depend on the circumstances of that individual vehicle. That’s not as simple as it having been exposed to high temperatures or UV radiation on a regular basis, either; the car’s entire history will be taken into account including whether it has ever been treated with an aftermarket paint treatment or has had body repairs at any stage.

Mitsubishi’s advice, then, is to take the vehicle to your nearest dealership and have the car examined to assess what the situation is. If that doesn’t satisfy you, you can also contact Mitsubishi Australia’s customer service division to discuss the issue.

For the record, shades of red are historically the worst offenders when it comes to fading and paint degradation. Paint technology has come a long way, but it remains that red pigments do not appreciate Australian levels of heat and UV radiation. In some cases, the original colour of the vehicle can be restored without resorting to repainting and this process can take many forms.

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Are there known problems with 2015 Mitsubishi Triton's intercooler pipes/hoses?

Answered by CarsGuide 30 Sep 2020

The MQ Triton doesn’t seem any better or worse than its rivals in this department. But, like other makes and models, there’s a healthy aftermarket supply of replacement intercoolers and the pipework that feeds them, so it’s definitely not an unknown problem.

But your experience is exceptional. Were all five vehicles bought brand-new at the same time? If so, they’re all likely to be from the same production run which could explain a faulty batch of hoses.

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What is causing my Mitsubishi Triton GLX auto to shudder?

Answered by CarsGuide 11 Sep 2020

When you say the suspension has been upgraded, did that, by any chance, involve raising the ride height? Problems centring around shuddering and vibrations, vague steering and the vehicle generally having a mind of its own are very common among owners who have paid good money to have the suspension hiked by anything from two to six inches.

Aside from the legal and insurance implications of this, raising these vehicles can throw the wheel-alignment settings (particularly the caster angle) out of whack and lead to the problems you’re experiencing. There are fixes including eccentric suspension bushes to return the angles back to normal, but it’s a specialist job.

Beyond that, a vibration at a particular speed can often be traced back to wheel balancing. The wheel and tyre combination on these vehicles is quite heavy, so making sure all the balance-weights are where they should be is critical.

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Mitsubishi Triton 2000: Problems putting it in reverse

Answered by CarsGuide 16 May 2020

There are three (generally speaking) things that can be causing this problem, Mark. You could have a problem with the clutch, the gear selectors or something internal in the gearbox itself. A worn or collapsed bearing or mangled gear cluster could cause this, but I’d expect other symptoms like horrendous noises and the refusal to select some gears at all, not just randomly. If you’re lucky, the cause could a simple mal-adjustment of the selector mechanism.

Meanwhile, you’ve told me you don’t think there’s anything wrong with the clutch but, to be honest, I’ve seen these same symptoms before on cars with worn out clutches. Sometimes the actuating fingers of the clutch break, other times there’s just too much wear for the clutch to function properly. Sometimes it’s as simple as a leak from the clutch’s hydraulic system or a stretched clutch cable. But either way, clutch problems can certainly cause this sort of grief.

Reverse can be hard to select because the clutch is not disengaging fully, so try this experiment: Turn the engine off and try to engage reverse. If it goes in easily every time and only baulks when the engine is running, that’s a classic case of a dying clutch.

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Mitsubishi Triton 2016 or Isuzu D-Max 2015: Which one should I buy?

Answered by CarsGuide 16 May 2020

The D-Max is pretty well regarded in the trade for its ability to go the distance, but modern, common-rail diesel technology has shown that a vehicle with fewer kilometres is usually a better bet than one with more. Although they do an amazing job in terms of power, torque, towing and fuel economy, today’s turbo-diesels are pretty highly strung in some ways and really need their maintenance. And the older they get, the more attention they seem to need in terms of new injectors, filters and pumps.

A D-Max with those kilometres might be ready for a pretty big (and expensive) service, too, so make sure your first trip in it isn’t going to be to a workshop. Ultimately, price, condition and service history should steer your decision as they should in any second-hand vehicle purchase. I’d take a vehicle with 150,000km with a full service history over a 60,000km one with no service records.

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Mitsubishi Triton 2008: Central locking issues

Answered by CarsGuide 4 May 2020

A lot of cars don’t like having a battery that is low on charge or being jump-started. Either of these things can cause the body computer or even the main ECU to start playing up. My guess in this case would be the body-computer which controls the dashboard functions and things like the central locking system.

Before you rush out and pay a mechanic to look at the vehicle, there are a couple of things to try. The first is to take the remote-control for the central locking and hold the button down for at least 30 seconds. Sometimes this is enough to reset the computer and return the vehicle to normal.

If that doesn’t work, get the engine up to temperature, shut it down and carefully disconnect the battery. Leave it that way for at least 30 minutes, reconnect the battery and see if that has produced a reset. You might find the car will run a bit roughly (mainly at idle) at first until the reset computer relearns a few parameters, so be careful on the first drive after trying any of this.

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Mitsubishi Triton 1999: What problems should I look out for?

Answered by CarsGuide 4 May 2020

The book price for such a vehicle is really anywhere from $2000 to $4000. Exceptionally well-kept, low-kilometre examples will bring more, tatty ex-work trucks might even be worth less than the lower of those numbers. A quarter of a million kilometres is not ‘just around the block’ either, so you really need to take each example on its individual merits when shopping for something as old as this.

The engines, both the diesel and petrol V6, in this model Triton are both capable of long lives provided they’ve been serviced properly, but there’s the next catch. As cars and utes become less and less valuable, they tend to get serviced more and more infrequently.

Problems you could encounter will run from everything from worn out suspension to rusty bodies, smoky engines, tired gearboxes, shredded interiors and everything else. In fact, if it can go wrong on a vehicle, then it’ll probably go wrong on an old, very second-hand work ute. You might also find that getting it up to a roadworthy condition will cost more than the vehicle itself is worth. At which point, something newer and slightly more expensive might start to look pretty good.

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RECALL: More than 100,000 Mitsubishi Triton utes could "catch fire"

RECALL: More than 100,000 Mitsubishi Triton utes could "catch fire"

13 Mar 2020 · by Justin Hilliard

Mitsubishi Australia has been forced to recall 102,616 MQ- and MR-series Triton utes over a fire risk

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Mitsubishi Triton 2005: Driver floor overheating.

Answered by CarsGuide 1 Nov 2019

Clearly there’s something under the floor generating the heat. Check things like the exhaust to make sure it’s away from the underbody, check the catalytic convertor to make sure it’s not partly blocked, and check the transmission cooler to see if it’s damaged.

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