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Mitsubishi Pajero 2020 pricing and spec confirmed: Three-variant line-up cut to just two

Mitsubishi’s Pajero range has been cut to just two, the GLX and GLS, as the Exceed is discontinued in a 2020 model year update.

Mitsubishi Australia has cut its ageing Pajero line-up from three flavours to two, ditching the top-tier Exceed while carrying on with the GLX and GLS priced at $53,990 before on-road costs and $59,490 respectively.

While pricing has remained static for Pajero variants, specification has increased with the addition of HID headlights with auto-levelling, washers and automatic high beams as standard across the board.

Carryover equipment includes a reversing camera, cruise control, seven seats, air-conditioning in the rear, 17-inch wheels and 7.0-inch multimedia system with Apple CarPlay/Android Auto compatibility.

The new GLS range-topper also gains a 12-speaker sound system and subwoofer from Rockford Fosgate in the update, alongside its already standard rear parking sensors, automatic wipers and headlights, heated and powered front seats, 18-inch wheels, and cargo blind.

Inside, the 2020 Mitsubishi Pajero features seating for seven and a 7.0-inch multimedia system. Inside, the 2020 Mitsubishi Pajero features seating for seven and a 7.0-inch multimedia system.

As before, the 2020 Pajero will continue to be powered by a 3.2-litre turbo-diesel four-cylinder engine, which produces 147kW of power at 3800rpm and 441Nm of torque from 2000rpm.

With drive sent to all four wheels via a five-speed automatic transmission, official fuel consumption readings are pegged at 9.1 litres per 100km.

Mitsubishi’s updated Pajero is also underpinned by the brand’s ‘Super Select II’ four-wheel-drive (4WD) system, featureing a rear differential lock and four driving modes – 2H, 4H, 4HLc and 4LLc.

Off-road credentials are also bolstered by a 45-degree incline, 35-degree climbing, 36.6-degree approach, 22.5-degree ramp breakover and 25-degree departure angles.

Underpinning the Pajero is a double wishbone front suspension with coil springs and a stabiliser bar, while the rear axle features a multi-link set-up.

Externally, there are no changes to the 2020 Pajero. Colours available include three pearlescent shades (‘Warm white’, ‘Terra Rossa’ and ‘Pitch black’) and four metallic hues (‘Cool silver’, ‘Ironbark’, ‘Graphite’ and ‘Pitch black’).

Power in the 2020 Mitsubishi Pajero comes courtesy of a 3.2-litre turbo-diesel engine, producing 147kW/441Nm. Power in the 2020 Mitsubishi Pajero comes courtesy of a 3.2-litre turbo-diesel engine, producing 147kW/441Nm.

All new Pajero SUVs come with Mitsubishi’s five-year/100,000km warranty with five-year perforation corrosion cover.

Mitsubishi Motors Australia boss John Signoriello called the Pajero a crucial part of the brand’s local line-up, despite the fact that no solid plans for the a new-generation version have been cemented.

“The authenticity and capability of the Pajero is what our customers like the most,” he said.

“Pajero drivers know they can depend on it when they take on their next challenge – whether that means heading out to the outback or towing. It’s an iconic part of our Australian product line-up.”

Of note, the Mitsubishi Pajero lacks advanced safety systems such as autonomous emergency braking (AEB), lane-keep assist and adaptive cruise control, with its current fourth-generation underpinnings first entering production back in 2006.

Japanese production of the Pajero is expected to wind down in August with the launch of the Final Edition variant in its home market, but CarsGuide understands Australian-market versions will continue to solider on.

2020 Mitsubishi Pajero pricing before on-road costs

ModelPrice
GLX – automatic$53,990
GLS – automatic$59,490

Do the small running changes to the Mitsubishi Pajero keep it competitive in the large SUV market? Tell us what you think in the comments below.