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Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior vs Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain 2022 4x4 ute comparison review

The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups.

The X-Terrain has garnered plenty of fans in the last few years and the Warrior has generated a stack of interest in a short amount of time.

The X-Terrain has been updated as part of a range-wide D-Max refresh, and now counts a tow bar receiver, a 50kg increase to its Gross Combination Mass (GCM) and styling tweaks among its new appealing qualities.

The Warrior is a hard-core 4WD collaboration between Nissan Australia and Melbourne-based vehicle engineering company, Premcar, and, as such, is purpose-built and Aussie-tested for off-road adventure.

The X-Terrain has a solid reputation as a great all-round ute and the Warrior has more than $9000 worth of aftermarket-style conversion work done to it and accessories onboard.

So, which one of these utes is best-suited to you? Read on.

  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain and the Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior are the top-spec variants in their line-ups (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Practicality

Let's size up these two utes, firstly their exterior dimensions. Surprise, surprise - they're pretty close in size.

 X-TerrainWarrior
Length5303mm5350mm
Width1880mm1920mm
Height1810mm1895mm
Wheelbase3125mm3150mm

Righto, what about the tray space/tub dimensions? Let's look at how they compare in the next table:

 X-TerrainWarrior
Length1570mm1509mm
Width1530mm1560mm
Between wheel arches1122mm1134mm
Depth490mm519mm

You might have guessed it, but there's not much to split these two in terms of their size and practicality. Make sure you read our detailed reviews of each of these utes to get down to the nitty gritty - including the interior practicality considerations that might matter to you if you're buying one of these utes as a family tourer.

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score8/108/10

Price and features

Our test vehicle, the 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (MSRP - plus on-road costs).

  • The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The 22MY X-Terrain 4x4 auto, is priced at $65,900 (Image: Glen Sullivan).

It has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine, a six-speed automatic transmission, and a part-time four-wheel drive system.

Standard features include a 9.0-inch multimedia display with sat-nav, Android Auto and wireless Apple CarPlay, an eight-speaker sound system, remote engine start, smart entry and start as well as roof rails, an under-rail tub liner, a hard roller cover on the tray, sports bar, front and rear underbody spoilers, and 18-inch dark grey metallic alloy wheels with 265/60R18 Bridgestone 684II HT tyres.

  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain features a six-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Most notable updates to the variant with the 22MY refresh include the 50kg GCM increase (increasing GCM from 5950kg to 6000kg); a factory-fitted tow bar receiver as standard; Lane Support switch on and off; and styling tweaks inside are leather-accented upholstery with red stitching and black interior touches; as well as auto-dimming mirror and heated front seats.

The standard range of paint finishes include Basalt Black mica, Cobalt Blue mica, Mercury Silver metallic, and Mineral White. Premium exterior paint colours include Marble White Pearl, as well as Magnetic Red Mica, Obsidian Grey mica and Volcanic Amber metallic. 

The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (MSRP - plus on-road costs). 

  • The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior auto has a listed price of $69,990 (Image: Glen Sullivan).

It has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine and either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission. We tested the auto.

The Warrior is available only in dual-cab pick-up style.

Standard features include 8.0-inch multimedia touch-screen with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and sat-nav, dual-zone climate control, AEB, lane-keeping assist, around-view monitor, and a rear diff-lock. 

  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)
  • The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan) The Warrior comes with either a six-speed manual gearbox or a seven-speed automatic transmission (Image: Glen Sullivan)

There have been no mechanical or performance changes.

As part of the Premcar engineering upgrade the $9360 worth of extras in the Warrior over and above what’s in the Pro-4X, include a winch-compatible bull bar with built-in light bar, a Warrior tow bar, a larger 3mm steel bash-plate, Cooper Discoverer All Terrain AT3 275/70R17 tyres (and a full-sized alloy spare), a 100kg GVM upgrade (now 3250kg), 260mm ground clearance (up 40mm, with springs and tyres making up 15mm and 25mm respectively), 30mm-wider tracks (to 1600mm), revised suspension with new spring rates and dampers (aimed at improving ride and handling), and a larger and taller jounce bumper for less impact harshness at full suspension stretch.

The Pro-4X Warrior has a Nissan Genuine towbar as standard.

Standard paint is black star; premium paint choices are white diamond and stealth grey at a cost of $650.

The X-Terrain is about $4000 cheaper than the Warrior and it’s packed with features, including a comprehensive suite of driver-assist tech, but it lacks the Warrior’s extensive off-road-focussed engineering and accessories. However, despite those crucial factors, the X-Terrain just edges out the Warrior to win this round.

And if you prefer to get your information about standard equipment inclusions in table form, here you go:

 X-TerrainWarrior
Sat navYY
Apple CarPlay / Android AutoYY
Touchscreen size9.0-inch8.0-inch
USB ports (front/rear)44
Radio AM/FM/DABAM/FM/DABAM/FM/DAB
CD playerYY
Sound system speakers86
Power point (220v/230v)22
Leather trimYY
Electric seat adjustment (driver and front passenger?)Driver onlyN
Memory settingsNN
Leather steering wheelYY
Heated seats (front)YN
Cooled seatsNN
Heated steering wheelNN
Climate controlYY
Rear air ventsYY
Rear fan controllerNN
Keyless entry / smart keyYY
Push-button startYY
Cruise control (Adaptive?)YN
Alloy wheels18-inch17-inch
Roof railsYY
LED headlightsYY
LED daytime running lightsYY
LED front fog lightsYY
Auto headlightsYY
Side stepsYY
Power tailgateNN
SunroofNN
TowbarYY

 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score8/107/10

Engine and transmission

The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine – producing 140kW at 3600rpm and 450Nm at 1600-2600rpm.

  • The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain has a 3.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan).

While the D-Max’s engine is not the torquiest 4WD ute engine in the world, it delivers that torque in such a nice fashion that it more than makes up for it, with ample torque available across a wide rev range.

The engine is matched to a six-speed automatic transmission and this combination is a proven one and works well. 

The X-Terrain has a part-time 4WD system. It has a dual-range transfer case (with high-and low-range 4WD), an off-road traction control system and a rear diff-lock. The driver is able to shift from 2H (two-wheel drive, high range) to 4H (4WD high range) while on the move, and up to speeds of 100km/h, The diff-lock may only be engaged when the vehicle is in 4L (4WD low range).

The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine – producing 140kW at 3750rpm and 450Nm at 1500-2500rpm – and it has a seven-speed automatic transmission - unlike the D-Max, you can get it with a six-speed manual, and it saves you a couple of grand. This is a pretty solid combination: generally unstressed and reliable in low-key but effective performance terms.

  • The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a 2.3-litre four-cylinder twin-turbo-diesel engine (Image: Glen Sullivan).

It has a part-time four-wheel drive system with high- and low-range 4WD, and a rear diff lock.

Two different set-ups with similar real-world performance: not the gutsiest or torquiest around but quite capable of tough 4WDing without any fuss.

 X-TerrainWarrior
Engine capacity3.0-litre2.3-litre
Cylinders44
Power140kW140kW
Torque450Nm450Nm
Timing belt or chainChainChain
Transmission6-speed auto7-speed auto
Driving wheelsRearRear
Kerb2165kg2298kg
Towing capacity (unbraked)750kg750kg
Towing capacity (braked)3500kg3500kg
Payload935kg952kg
Gross vehicle mass (GVM)3100kg3250kg
Gross combined mass (GCM)6000kg5910kg

 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score7/107/10

Fuel consumption

Official fuel consumption for the X-Terrain is 8.0L/100km on a combined cycle.

On this test I recorded actual fuel consumption of 11.0L/100km. Remember: this test included a lot of low-range 4WDing.

The D-Max has a 76-litre fuel tank, so, going by those fuel-fuel-consumption figures, I’d expect an effective touring in range of about 690km on this sort of trip with a lot of low-range 4WDing, but remember that it’s a good idea to take about 30km-50km* off any calculated touring-range figure to give it a built-in safe-distance buffer. (*Opt for the higher or lower figure depending on how risk-averse you are.)

The Warrior’s fuel consumption is listed as 8.1L/100km on a combined cycle. 

Fuel consumption on this test was 11.2L/100km. As noted above, this test included a lot of hard low-range 4WDing.

The Warrior has an 80-litre fuel tank, so, going by those fuel-consumption figures, I’d expect an effective touring in range of about 715km on this kind of tough trip, but remember that figure includes a built-in 50km safe-distance buffer.

That's a fair travelling distance for a contemporary dual-cab ute, but keep in mind that your fuel-consumption will be higher than that because you'll be carrying a lot more gear than we had onboard during our test, which included vehicle-recovery equipment, a portable air compressor, tool bag, puncture-repair kit, tyre deflator, food and water.

The Warrior has the bigger fuel tank so expect to get more touring range out of it, according to these fuel-consumption figures, but I reckon it’s close enough in fuel-consumption terms to be a draw.
 

 X-TerrainWarrior
Claimed combined fuel use (L/100km)8.0L/100km8.1L/100km
Fuel use on test, off-road (L/100km)11.0L/100km11.2L/100km
Theoretical range based on testing690km715km
Fuel tank capacity7680

 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score7/107/10

Off-road driving

Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain

The X-Terrain has a nice way of simply trucking along (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain has a nice way of simply trucking along (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Along the dirt tracks and gravel roads that weave their way to our 4WD proving and testing ground in southern NSW, the X-Terrain has a nice way of simply trucking along, with the engine and transmission working so well together that it has an almost lazy quality about it, making it a relaxing drive.

The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot; it’s always right where it needs to be.

The issue of the suspension set-up on utes is always a bit of an elephant in the room because it's never going to be as well sorted as a wagon or a strictly road-going vehicle. Having said that, the D-Max’s suspension does a good job of keeping everything settled and controlled on-road and even when the road gets rougher. 

  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • 2022 Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain | Dirt Off-road 2022 Isuzu D-Max X-Terrain | Dirt Off-road
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan). The transmission is never found scrambling up and down for the sweet spot (Image: Glen Sullivan).

No mechanical or off-road driver-assist tech changes have been made to this updated D-Max, which is fine because, as is, it’s a rock-solid 4WD in stock-standard form. 

The X-Terrain has a claimed 240mm of ground clearance, a wading depth of 800mm and approach, departure and ramp-over angles of 30.5 degrees, 19.0 degrees, and 23.8 degrees, respectively. That's all pretty standard for an unmodified dual-cab ute of this kind.

The engine and transmission work really well on-road and are really good off-road when it’s time for low-speed, low-range 4WDing as well. 

  • The engine and transmission work really well on-road (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine and transmission work really well on-road (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The engine and transmission work really well on-road (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine and transmission work really well on-road (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The engine and transmission work really well on-road (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine and transmission work really well on-road (Image: Glen Sullivan).

There’s a lot to like about this engine: it never feels stressed, you can keep revs nice and low – and there’s never any need to rev the hell out of it because it ticks along nicely. 

There is plenty of torque accessible across a wide rev range, and that is crucial when you're 4WDing.

Low-range gearing (2.482:1) is sound, throttle response is sound – with a pedal that’s not too sensitive to bouncing and bumping when you’re rocking-and-rolling through 4WD territory – and traction control is effective. While I have praised the tweaked off-road traction control in recent reviews, I've since re-evaluated my opinion of it somewhat and, though it is effective, the Isuzu ute’s traction control doesn't quite feel as dialled-in as the systems in some of its rivals. It is good, it is effective, but it just lacks that tiny bit of quiet finesse that some of the other systems exhibit.

  • The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan). The engine never feels stressed and you can keep revs nice and low (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Adding to the D-Max’s off-road weapons systems, the rear diff lock can be engaged at speeds up to 8km/h and only when you're in four-wheel drive low-range (4L). It will disengage when you hit 30km/h or more. Note: when you engage the diff lock, off-road traction control is disengaged.

It’s a great addition and one that’ll help to keep you moving along off-road on traction-compromised terrain and ultimately give you more peace of mind on the tracks.

Hill descent control is impressive, holding our test vehicle to a controlled 3-4km/h while driving down some steep set-pieces. 

Hill descent control is impressive (Image: Glen Sullivan). Hill descent control is impressive (Image: Glen Sullivan).

And while the X-Terrain is generally an impressive off-roader in stock-standard guise, there are a few trade offs – and one of those is something that I’ve noted before in a lot of contemporary utes and the same goes for the D-Max. As mentioned, it has a listed 240mm ground clearance, but it feels vulnerable to scrubbing dirt with its undercarriage and side steps. This is the way of most modern utes though. The new D-Max does have a longer wheelbase and shorter body than before and the fact it has pronounced side steps doesn’t help either, but this low-riding sensation can be negated with slower, more considered driving, but should be resolved with an aftermarket suspension / lift if you plan to use your D-Max as an off-road tourer for destinations beyond the beaten tracks.

The other trade-off is its showroom tyres. Vehicle manufacturers put road-biased rubber on their lifestyle vehicles because those tyres yield a quiet, comfortable ride on-road, but they’re not suited to 4WDing so, to make your X-Terrain even more effective off-road, buy a set of decent all-terrain tyres to replace the road rubber.

If you’re planning to use your X-Terrain as a platform for your off-road adventures, you’ll be interested in its load-carrying capacities, so here they are: payload is listed as 935kg, unbraked towing capacity is 750kg and braked towing capacity is 3500kg.

The X-Terrain has a roller-top cover over its tray (Image: Glen Sullivan). The X-Terrain has a roller-top cover over its tray (Image: Glen Sullivan).

The X-Terrain has a roller-top cover over its tray which affords whatever is stowed in the back some protection from the weather and sticky-fingered types, but we’ve experienced minor issues with its operation on previous tests. It looks stylish but on a recent long-term test, the roller top’s rails became gummed up with bush debris (leaves, dirt and grit) on several bush trips and opening/closing it became increasingly difficult.

The tray is 1570mm long (at floor height), 1530mm wide (1122mm wide between wheel arches) and the load-space is 490mm deep.

  • The tray is 1570mm long, 1530mm wide and the load-space is 490mm deep (Image: Glen Sullivan). The tray is 1570mm long, 1530mm wide and the load-space is 490mm deep (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The tray is 1570mm long, 1530mm wide and the load-space is 490mm deep (Image: Glen Sullivan). The tray is 1570mm long, 1530mm wide and the load-space is 490mm deep (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Some of the news of substance with this range refresh is the increase in the X-Terrain’s gross combined mass by 50 kilograms, from 5950kg to 6000kg. That may not seem like a huge amount of weight but every little bit helps when it comes to packing for off-road trips. In practical terms, that 50kg increase means you are given a little bit more leeway with how much you can take away with you, onboard and towing (GCM).
 

Nissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior

Premcar’s work on the Pro-4X Warrior has focussed on the wheels and tyres and the suspension (Image: Glen Sullivan). Premcar’s work on the Pro-4X Warrior has focussed on the wheels and tyres and the suspension (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Premcar’s work on the Pro-4X Warrior has focussed on the wheels and tyres and the suspension – new springs and shocks, adding a 40mm total suspension lift – is Warrior-specific and aimed at yielding a more controlled, more compliant ride and more comfortable ride. The benefit of that package is really only obvious when you hit dirt tracks or gravel roads that are minefields of deep ruts and severe muddy potholes. 

The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps. It’s not in the realm of something like a Ford Ranger Raptor, but it’s doing okay.

The Warrior has a nice, settled feel to it on the dirt. In fact, it rides very smoothly – for a ute – through pretty ordinary terrain.

  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior’s suspension package really does take the edge off a lot of harsher lumps and bumps (Image: Glen Sullivan).

The Warrior is wider and taller than the Pro-4X, so as well as having more ground clearance and better, more off-road-friendly angles – approach (36 degrees), departure (19 degrees), and ramp-over (26.2 degrees) – the vehicle has a more natural, planted stance on tracks, giving a little bit more control through trickier routes. 

Steering retains a nice lightness to it, so for a reasonably big ute, it gets around quite nicely. Put it this way, it never feels too cumbersome to steer along bush tracks. 

Low-range gearing (2.717:1) is good and there's plenty of torque across a nice spread of revs, so you can tap into that pretty much whenever you need to when you're low-speed, low-range, four-wheel driving.

Don’t forget the rear diff lock, always a crucial part of any 4WD’s track-tackling toolkit.

As well, hill descent control is effective, holding you to a sustained low speed when you are going down a hill. 

Hill descent control is effective, holding you to a sustained low speed when you are going down a hill (Image: Glen Sullivan). Hill descent control is effective, holding you to a sustained low speed when you are going down a hill (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Beyond any of its other mechanical or driver-assist tech attributes, what really sets the Warrior apart is its pure physicality that makes it suited to four-wheel driving: raised suspension, better ground clearance (260mm), and a wider wheel track, among other things, give it a stability, give it the ability to get up and over hard-core rocks steps and anything else you could likely point it at.

It has a listed wading depth of 600mm and, while we didn’t go through any creek crossings, we did go through several mud holes which would have been tickling that measure in terms of depth.

  • The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior has a listed wading depth of 600mm (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Showroom-standard 4WDs often leave the car yard with road-friendly rubber, to give customers a comfortable and reasonably quiet ride, but those are far from ideal if you’re planning to use your vehicle as an off-road tourer.

The Warrior is shod with Cooper Discoverer AT3s, a light truck tyre, very decent all-terrain rubber and pretty well matched to any situation you can drive yourself into. These tyres offer plenty of bite, aren’t too noisy on the blacktop and don't seem to affect ride and handling in any pronounced negative way. 

  • The Warrior is shod with Cooper Discoverer AT3s, a light truck tyre (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior is shod with Cooper Discoverer AT3s, a light truck tyre (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • The Warrior is shod with Cooper Discoverer AT3s, a light truck tyre (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Warrior is shod with Cooper Discoverer AT3s, a light truck tyre (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Niggles? The steering is not reach-adjustable, which means I couldn’t quite dial-in my driving position; and the 2.3-litre engine becomes a bit noisy when pushed hard.

In terms of packability for touring, it’s okay.

Payload is listed as 952kg. The tub itself is a decent enough load space. It measures 1509mm long, 1560mm wide, 1134mm (between the wheel arches), and 519mm deep.

  • In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan). In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan). In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan). In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan).
  • In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan). In terms of packability for touring, the Warrior is okay (Image: Glen Sullivan).

It has a durable tub-liner, the Utili-track load-restraint system (basically a rail mounted to each tub side wall with two moveable tie-down points in each rail), plus four fixed tie-down points lower down on the tub’s inside wall.

As with the D-Max, towing capacity is 750kg (unbraked) and 3500kg (braked). This Navara has a 100kg gross vehicle mass (GVM) upgrade to 3250kg and a GCM (gross combined mass) of 5910kg.

The X-Terrain hasn’t lost a step off-road and continues to impress, but it’s hampered in the rough stuff by its underbody vulnerability and tyres – but those are easily addressed issues. The Warrior, however, is built for this stuff as is and eats it up.
 

 X-TerrainWarrior
Approach angle (degrees)30.536
Departure angle (degrees)19.019.0
Break-over angle (degrees)23.826.2
Ground clearance (mm)240260
Wading depth (mm)800600
Turning circle / turning radius (m)12.512.5
TyresBridgestone Dueler H/TCooper Discoverer AT3
4x4 systemPart-timePart-time
Drive modesY
Rear diff lock (electric?)YY
Centre diff lockNN
Front suspensionCoilsCoils
Rear suspensionLeafCoils

 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score7/108/10

Safety

The D-Max range has a five-star ANCAP rating from testing in 2020.  

It has eight airbags (including a knee and centre airbag) and every D-MAX has Isuzu’s Intelligent Driver Assistance System (IDAS), which includes such driver-assist tech as AEB, adaptive cruise control, Lane Keep Assist, Lane Departure Prevention, Traffic Sign Recognition, and a reversing camera with rear cross traffic alert. 

The rear seat has two child-seat anchorage points and one ISOFIX point each on the left and right seats.

The Navara line-up has a five-star ANCAP safety rating from testing in 2015. 

Safety gear includes seven airbags (dual front, front-side, curtain and driver’s knee SRS items), AEB, forward collision warning, lane departure warning, intelligent lane intervention, blind spot warning, a surround-view monitor (with moving object detection), rear cross traffic alert, and more.

The rear seat has two child-seat anchorage points and an ISOFIX point on each outboard seat.

Off-road driver-assist tech includes off-road monitor, tyre pressure monitoring system, hill start assist, trailer sway control, hill descent control and an electronic locking rear differential.

It’s missing adaptive cruise control, and is not quite as comprehensively equipped with driver-assist tech as some of its rivals. 

The X-Terrain has the more comprehensive suite of safety gear and driver-assist tech.

 X-TerrainWarrior
Reversing cameraYY
360-degree viewYY
Parking sensors (front/rear)YY
Airbags87
Auto emergency braking (AEB)YY
Pedestrian detectionYY
Cyclist detectionYY
Adaptive cruise controlYN
Lane departure warningYY
Lane keep assistYY
Blind-spot monitoringYY
Rear cross-traffic alertYY
ANCAP safety rating (year tested)5 stars (2020)5 stars (2015)

 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score8/107/10

Ownership

The D-Max has a six-year/150,000km warranty and seven years of roadside assistance. That warranty is okay in terms of years, but unlimited kms would be a welcome sweetener.

The D-Max has a six-year/150,000km warranty and seven years of roadside assistance (Image: Glen Sullivan). The D-Max has a six-year/150,000km warranty and seven years of roadside assistance (Image: Glen Sullivan).

Service intervals are scheduled for every 12 months or 15,000km, whichever occurs soonest. 

Capped Price Servicing covers the first seven scheduled services. The cost per service is $409 at 15,000km, $429 at 30,000km, $629 at 45,000km, $529 at 60,000km, $319 at 75,000km, $769 at 90,000km, and $429 at 105,000km – for a total cost of $3513, according to Isuzu.

Servicing costs are getting steep and, in an increasingly competitive dual-cab ute market, potential buyers scrutinise those. 

The Navara range is covered by a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, and capped price servicing. That’s adequate in terms of years, not the best, but the unlimited kms factor is in its favour.

The Navara range is covered by a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, and capped price servicing (Image: Glen Sullivan). The Navara range is covered by a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, and capped price servicing (Image: Glen Sullivan).

The bonus here though is that Nissan’s five-year warranty covers all of the Premcar conversion work and the accessories.

Service intervals are set for 12 months or 20,000km. Capped price servicing is available for up to six years. Prices range from $502 to $783 per service.

Rivals, such as the Ford Ranger and Mitsubishi Triton, offer servicing costs at a fraction of the Nissan’s, which comparatively seems a bit pricey in the dual-cab ute ownership stakes.
 

 X-TerrainWarrior
Service interval (months / km)12 months / 15,000km12 months / 20,000km
Annual service cost (average over first 5 years)$514.30$603
Capped price service plan (years / km)7/105,000km6/120,000km
Warranty cover (years / km)Six-year/150,000kmFive-year/unlimited km
Roadside assist included?YY

 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score7/107/10

So, which one of these utes is best for you? Well, it depends on what you’re after.

The refreshed X-Terrain is an impressive all-rounder: it’s comfortable on-road – refined and nice to drive – and it’s packed with driver-assist tech and it’s more capable as a 4WD than it’s ever been before.

But the Pro-4X Warrior is a ready-made adventure machine – it looks good, drives nicely on-road and is very capable off-road.

Some keen 4WDers might prefer to source their own aftermarket accessories but you just can’t deny the appeal of being able to buy a bush-ready tourer straight out of the showroom, with a stack of re-engineering work and aftermarket-style accessories already onboard and integrated – and all of that covered by Nissan’s five-year warranty on the base vehicle, and Premcar’s five-year warranty on the conversion.

While the X-Terrain is generally a more refined vehicle, the Warrior is so handy off-road and decent enough on-road that it makes up for any perceived lack of refinement.

Both of these vehicles are a nice mix of style and substance, but the Warrior is just that much better at tackling hard 4WDing – it barely breaks the vehicular equivalent of a sweat – and, though the X-Terrain technically wins on overall points in this face-off, the Warrior is the stand-out for me in terms of off-road capability and suitability. 
 

 Isuzu D-Max X-TerrainNissan Navara Pro-4X Warrior
Score8/108/10

$67,500 - $69,990

Based on new car retail price

VIEW PRICING & SPECS

adventureguide rank

  • Light

    Dry weather gravel roads and formed trails with no obstacles, very shallow water crossings.

  • Medium

    Hard-packed sand, slight to medium hills with minor obstacles in all weather.

  • Heavy

    Larger obstacles, steeper climbs and deeper water crossings; plus tracks marked as '4WD only'

Price Guide

$67,500 - $69,990

Based on new car retail price

Disclaimer: The pricing information shown in the editorial content (Review Prices) is to be used as a guide only and is based on information provided to Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd (Carsguide) both by third party sources and the car manufacturer at the time of publication. The Review Prices were correct at the time of publication.  Carsguide does not warrant or represent that the information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon this information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.