Browse over 9,000 car reviews

Used Nissan X-Trail review: 2001-2013

EXPERT RATING
7
Though often used only as an on-road station wagon, Nissan's X-Trail is pretty competent as an SUV. While not intended to be used in extreme 4WD conditions, it can handle most recreational off-road driving with little trouble. Providing enjoyment to adventurous families while doing so.  Nissan X-Trail uses a complex

Though often used only as an on-road station wagon, Nissan's X-Trail is pretty competent as an SUV. While not intended to be used in extreme 4WD conditions, it can handle most recreational off-road driving with little trouble. Providing enjoyment to adventurous families while doing so. 

Nissan X-Trail uses a complex 4WD system that offers good traction through a variety of driver selected settings, or can be left to its own devices under Auto. Unlike many all-wheel-drive systems, the X-Trail can be used on unsealed roads as well as on bitumen if extra traction is required, particularly during wet and icy weather. This new model for the 2008 season had a further upgrading of the already-good 4WD system. Now called All Mode 4x4-i, it has three settings: front-wheel drive, 4WD-lock or automatic.

Nissan X-Trail doesn't have a transfer case for torque multiplication when climbing or descending steep hills, so don't get over ambitious or you could be stuck in a place where full-on 4WDs will be required to haul you out.

On-road, the X-Trail handles well for its class. It's no sports machine but is stable and predictable. It doesn't have the same safety in corners as low-slung passenger cars.

The X-Trail had a big 2.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine, giving it the sort of grunty torque Australian drivers love. However, like many big fours it's not all that happy to run to the top end of the rev band. A 2.0-litre turbo-diesel option was introduced in August 2008 and is a relatively quiet unit with low fuel consumption and, again, strong torque.

Five-speed manuals were fitted until an all-new X-Trail was launched in October 2007, when a six-speed manual was installed. Similarly, the older versions had a four-speed automatic transmission; the newer ones featured a continuously variable transmission, it has six speed preset speeds should the driver disagree with the computer's decisions. 

Nissan X-Trail has good front-seat space and legroom in the rear is better than average for this class. The rear seats have the versatility of both split-fold and double-fold. The boot is an exceptional size. 

While the Nissan X-Trail is relatively easy for the home handyperson to work on, we advise that safety-related items be left to the professional mechanic. If you do your own work do yourself a favour by buying a workshop manual.

There are plenty of Nissan dealers throughout Australia, even in remote areas. Not all dealers in the outback will carry uncommon spare parts for an X-Trail, but should be able to get them within a few days.

Insurance costs are about average for this class and most companies seem to rate the vehicles at much the same price. Try shopping around if you like, but make sure you are comparing apples with apples when doing so.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Examine the body sides for scratches that probably mean it's had some real off-road use. 

Be sure to get a quote from a panel beater, though a scratch and dent specialist may be able to do the work as well.

Look at the underside of the body and mechanical components for signs of damage, or sand or salt encrustation. 

Check the interior for signs of water and/or mud stains, don't forget to look for damage to the carpet in the load area. 

Make sure the engine starts easily and doesn't hesitate when asked to accelerate suddenly. Ideally the start test should be done with the engine completely cold.

Manual gearboxes that are noisy and/or harsh in their changes could be about to cost someone a lot of money.

CAR BUYING TIP

Always be wary of any crossover or SUV that may have been actually taken off road, not that that happens every often.

Pricing

Year Price From Price To
2013 $7,800 $18,040
2012 $6,500 $16,280
2011 $5,900 $14,520
2010 $6,200 $13,090
2009 $5,500 $11,550
2008 $4,600 $9,680
2007 $3,700 $8,140
2006 $3,000 $6,820
2005 $2,800 $5,940
2004 $2,400 $4,950
2003 $2,000 $5,170
2002 $2,200 $4,510
2001 $2,400 $4,070

View all Nissan X-Trail pricing and specifications

Pricing guides

$3,235
Based on third party pricing data
Lowest Price
$2,400
Highest Price
$4,070

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
ST (4X4) 2.5L, ULP, 5 SP MAN $2,400 – 4,070 2001 Nissan X-Trail 2001 ST (4X4) Pricing and Specs
Ti (4x4) 2.5L, ULP, 4 SP AUTO $2,400 – 4,070 2001 Nissan X-Trail 2001 Ti (4x4) Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
7
Disclaimer: The pricing information shown in the editorial content (Review Prices) is to be used as a guide only and is based on information provided to Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd (Carsguide) both by third party sources and the car manufacturer at the time of publication. The Review Prices were correct at the time of publication.  Carsguide does not warrant or represent that the information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon this information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.