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Peugeot 4007 SV 2010 review

You can expect all sorts of quirky controls in French vehicles, but the Peugeot 4007 is straight forward and conventional.

Is there anybody out there who actually believes their quality of life has been improved by the invention of voice-recognition phone answering services?  Peugeot at least must think so, because – while normal Bluetooth phone pairing in a car can be taxing - the Peugeot 4007 Bluetooth uses a voice-recognition system that raises the definition of frustrating to a whole new level.

However, once installed, the voice-recognition works fine for dialling and answering calls hands-free.  Thankfully the Bluetooth pairing system is the only odd thing about the new Peugeot 4007 compact soft-roading SUV.  You can usually expect all sorts of quirky switches and controls in French vehicles, but this car is straight forward and conventional.

Appearance and fit-out

Explore the 2010 Peugeot 4007 range

And unlike most Pugs, the 4007 seems to be in touch with its masculine side. It has rugged good looks, plenty of brushed aluminium accents inside and out, plus four-wheel drive with a diff lock and a rattly diesel engine. Essentially it's an Outlander made by Mitsubishi in Japan.

While the exterior looks bold and macho with its aluminium roof racks, rugged panels and solid sidesteps, the interior is all luxury in the top-of-the-line, seven-seater SV trim model I tested.  Over the standard ST trim, the SV adds 18-inch alloys, electric driver's seat, heated front seats, leather upholstery and trim, and Xenon headlights with auto height adjustment and washers for an extra $5000.

The leather is soft and plush with tasty contrast stitching. The instruments have nice chrome accents and there is plenty of brushed aluminium and fake carbon fibre aboard to satisfy most male egos.  Some of the plastics are a bit hard and could scratch with use, but the areas that your elbows and hands will touch are padded leather.

The coloured computer display in the centre of the instrument binnacle is a nice touch with plenty of information.  While the steering wheel is annoyingly non-adjustable for reach, the electric driver's seat is multi-adjustable so it isn't too difficult to find a good driving position.

The Pug comes in five or seven seat options, but the SV is only available with the extra third row.  There is plenty of leg and headroom in the cabin, even in the third row of seats, although that back bench is thin and hard, suitable only for children on short trips.

Folding out the rear row is a bit tricky first go and a bit stiff, but that should loosen up with some use.  When folded down it leaves a flat floor and the second row also tumbles forward to provide an enormous rear cargo area.  Drivers will find the controls conventional and the driving experience fairly typical of most soft roaders.

Mechanical

It features a 2.2-litre diesel engine that owes its origins to Ford and the PSA group that builds Citroens and Peugeots, and also appears in the Land Rover Freelander 2.  It's not the smoothest and quietest of diesels around. It clatters at idle and rumbles under power, but has strong pick-up, 380Nm of hauling power and will deliver good fuel economy. Even in peak-hour traffic it returned a very respectable 7.4L/100km.

There is hardly any lag when you accelerate off the mark with maximum 380Nm of torque on song from just 2000rpm. However, it doesn't cope well with all that torque, spinning the front wheels in the wet, lighting up the traction control and yanking the steering wheel left and right.

Four-wheel drive system

There is much less wheel-spin and torque-steer histrionics when four-wheel drive is engaged on the convenient rotary dial in the centre console.  The dial makes it a simple process to move from 2WD to 4WD and to lock the diff, giving you the impression that this is a go-anywhere adventure machine.

But its lack of a full-size spare, clearance and approach and departure angles, plus its overall level of luxury appointments mean it will rarely venture into more challenging terrain than the gravel driveway of your children's private school.  Most drivers will probably stay in 2WD for the economy benefits and only engage 4WD to negotiate the slippery grass around the rugby field.

Driving

It has a plush ride, a tippy feeling in corners and the steering is a bit too sensitive, especially on the highway.  But the brakes have a solid effect on slowing the 1.8-tonne vehicle, and the double-clutch, six-speed auto transmission is quick, slick and silky smooth.

Despite its rugged appearance and the off-roading pretensions of the drive selector dial, this is a suburban soccer taxi.  The Bridgestone Dueler tyres tell the tale: They are the ‘HT’ type for highway terrain, not ‘AT’ for all terrain.

Pricing guides

$6,385
Based on third party pricing data
Lowest Price
$4,300
Highest Price
$8,470

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
ST (5 Seat) 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP $4,600 – 7,370 2010 Peugeot 4007 2010 ST (5 Seat) Pricing and Specs
ST (7 Seat) 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP $4,700 – 7,590 2010 Peugeot 4007 2010 ST (7 Seat) Pricing and Specs
SV (7 Seat) 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP $5,500 – 8,470 2010 Peugeot 4007 2010 SV (7 Seat) Pricing and Specs
Pricing Guide

$4,300

Lowest price, based on third party pricing data

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