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Toyota Corolla
EXPERT RATING
7.2
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Toyota Corolla

Toyota Corolla Pricing and Specs

2021 price from
$23,895*

The Toyota Corolla is available from $23,895 to $35,645 for the 2021 range of models in Hatchback and Sedan body types.

Think Toyota and you're inevitably thinking Corolla. Always near the top of the brand's best-seller list in Australia, the Corolla is popular with private buyers, but it is its appearance on company and government fleets across Australia that contributes to its always stunning sales results. While it's not known for engaging driving dynamics or cutting-edge in-cabin technology, its hard-earned reputation for bulletproof reliability and aftersales care ensures it remains a top choice for small car buyers. It's available with a choice of petrol or hybrid engines, and in a hatch or sedan body shape.

The Corolla Ascent Sport + TR KIT starts off at $23,895, while the range-topping, Corolla ZR TWO Tone Option Hybrid is priced at $35,645.

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Year Price From Price To
2021 $23,895 $35,645
2020 $16,400 $35,860
2019 $12,800 $32,120
2018 $11,300 $26,840
2017 $10,700 $24,970
2016 $9,600 $22,550
2015 $8,400 $20,460
2014 $6,200 $18,480
2013 $5,600 $16,940
2012 $4,600 $14,300
2011 $3,700 $11,110
2010 $3,100 $9,790
2009 $2,600 $7,590
2008 $2,500 $5,940
2007 $2,200 $6,050
2006 $2,100 $5,720
2005 $2,400 $5,390
2004 $2,300 $5,390
2003 $2,300 $5,170
2002 $2,200 $5,060
2001 $2,200 $5,060
2000 $1,900 $4,070
1999 $1,900 $4,070
1998 $1,900 $4,070
1997 $1,800 $4,070
1996 $1,800 $4,070
1995 $1,800 $4,070
1994 $1,800 $4,070
1993 $1,800 $4,070
1992 $1,250 $4,070
1991 $1,250 $4,070
1990 $1,250 $4,070
1989 $1,250 $4,070
1988 $1,250 $3,630
1987 $1,250 $3,630
1986 $940 $3,630
1985 $940 $4,290
1984 $940 $4,290
1983 $940 $4,290
1982 $940 $4,070
1981 $940 $4,070
1980 $940 $4,070
1979 $940 $4,070
1978 $1,250 $4,070
1977 $1,900 $4,070
1976 $1,900 $4,070
1975 $1,550 $4,070
1974 $1,450 $4,070
1973 $1,250 $4,070
1972 $1,250 $3,080
1971 $1,250 $3,080
1970 $1,250 $3,140
1969 $1,250 $3,850
1968 $1,250 $3,850
1967 $1,250 $2,040

Toyota Corolla FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Toyota Corolla here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Does the 2012 Toyota Corolla have a timing chain or timing belt?

    Good news, Amy; your Corolla has an engine with a timing chain rather than a timing belt. While a timing belt needs periodic replacement, the timing chain should be good for the life of the engine.

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  • What is the best small car for under $30000?

    You don't need to spend $30,000 to get a great small car to run around town in. A Suzuki Swift GL Navigator from $17,690 plus on-road costs ($1000 more for the auto) makes for an excellent choice, with a surprisingly roomy interior, a refined, frugal and lively engine, great handling and superb reliability. Great value for money, in other words.

    Moving on from there, to the next size up and in our order of preference, are the Mazda 3, Ford Focus Active, Volkswagen Golf, Toyota Corolla Hatch, Honda Civic (turbo only) and Subaru Impreza. All are quality small cars that should fit the bill perfectly.

    There's also merit in considering a small SUV, chiefly because their higher roofline and loftier seating positions make them easier to get in and out as well as see out of. Our value pick is the Kia Seltos S with Safety Pack. The Mazda CX-30 and Toyota C-HR are also high-quality and refined choices, though they're right at the cusp of your budget so you may have to search for a discounted demo model. Going small SUV does  mean extra outlay, but they do generally offer better resale value, as their popularity seems endless.

    As you can see, there's lots of choice, so take your time, drive the ones you like the look of, and see which feels best. Out of scores of alternatives, these 10 are our top recommendations at under $30K.

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  • What's the resale value of a Volkswagen Golf and a Toyota Corolla?

    A Volkswagen Golf that is already one year old will already have done a big chunk of its depreciating. The Corolla, on the other hand, will – like all brand-new cars – dump value like crazy. That said, both cars have a fair way to go in depreciation terms. Keeping them for just a year won’t help there, either, as you’ll effectively be maximising the amount you lose.

    The trade regards the Corolla (as a Toyota) very highly and, as such, resale values tend to be better than a lot of cars. The VW Golf, meanwhile, still suffers from the stigma of the reliability problems many owners experienced and can be a little more difficult to unload without resorting to selling it to a wholesaler who will make you really understand what depreciation means.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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