Menu

Browse over 9,000 car reviews

Sorry, there are no cars that match your search

You are here

Mercedes-Benz E-Class E220 All-Terrain 2017 review

EXPERT RATING
8.3
Will the off-road flavoured Mercedes wagon endear loyal E-Class Estate fans? We've put it through its paces on road and off.

Aside from gull-winged supercars, stunning sports cars and coupes, plus saloons of all sizes that define status around the globe, Mercedes-Benz is also famous for its elegant yet very practical station wagons. Or Estates in Merc-speak.

Long before SUVs really existed (and two years before the industrial G-Class first appeared), the three-pointed star was offering wagon-bodied versions of its core sedan models that allowed owners to mix pleasure with business, or simply pleasure while carrying vast cargo in the back.

Merc Estates have never simply been an extended roof tacked onto the back, with a depth of design that integrates cargo restraints like the characteristic retractable net, but also generally including an extra two seats that fold neatly into the floor. No, your giant Mazda CX-9 wasn’t the first to do this.

Fast forward to 2017, and the popularity of the ever-expanding array of Merc SUVs and SUV-coupe spin-offs is threatening to render the Estate obsolete, outside Europe at least.

  • The combination of airbag suspension and the All-Terrain’s slightly taller tyre sidewalls help the wagon ride commendably well. The combination of airbag suspension and the All-Terrain’s slightly taller tyre sidewalls help the wagon ride commendably well.
  • The All-Terrain uses a slightly rear-biased (45/55) torque split in this application. The All-Terrain uses a slightly rear-biased (45/55) torque split in this application.

We’re still big fans of the wagon bodystyle, and Mercedes says there are enough loyal Merc wagonists to keep them on the radar for Australia. The latest C-Class Estate is actually proving more popular than the version it replaced, but the bigger E-Class is more of a niche offering.

Which is where the new E 220 d All-Terrain comes in. For the first time, Mercedes has added a bit of off-road SUV flavour and ability to the E-Class Estate, and with this extra sparkle it makes sense for it to be the sole long-roof version of the W213-generation E-Class to be brought down under.

But does this extra sparkle retain the elegance that keeps E-Class Estate buyers coming back for more?

Mercedes-Benz E-Class 2017: E220 d (ALL TERRAIN)
Safety rating
Engine Type2.0L turbo
Fuel TypeDiesel
Fuel Efficiency5.7L/100km
Seating5 seats
Price from$64,900

Is there anything interesting about its design?   8/10

The All-Terrain styling pack is comprised of tough-looking front and rear bumpers, with unpainted plastic side skirts and wheelarch flares on all corners. This will all be welcomed by anyone who travels regularly on dirt roads, but the All-Terrain bits will also provide a handy disguise from urban parking scrapes.

A brilliantly integrated suite of active and passive safety features represents the forefront of occupant and pedestrian protection. A brilliantly integrated suite of active and passive safety features represents the forefront of occupant and pedestrian protection.

The double-blade grille, wheels and roof rails are also bespoke to the All-Terrain, and the net result is a distinct personality that should satisfy the majority of previous E-Class Estate buyers previously opting for the AMG styling pack.

Interior trim is based on the regular E-Class Avantgarde package, but with specific rubber studded pedals and All-Terrain branded floor mats to align with the exterior treatment.

In the default suspension setting, the All-Terrain sits 29mm higher than a regular E-Class. Taller tyres make up 14mm of this, while the remaining 15mm is thanks to an elevated 'Air Body Control' air suspension. A further 20mm of lift is available with the All-Terrain drive mode selected, but only at speeds up to 35km/h.
 
The All-Terrain’s 20-inch alloys are a staggered fitment with 245/40 tyres up front and 275/35 at the rear, while taller-sidewalled 245/45R19 at each corner are a no-cost option, and essential if you wish to use snow chains.

Like the Estate available internationally, the All-Terrain rides on the same 2939mm wheelbase as the E-Class sedan but gains an extra 24mm in rear overhang to measure 4947mm overall.

The wagon body, extra kit and all-wheel drivetrain also add an extra 240kg to the kerb weight over the E 220 d sedan, with the All-Terrain tipping the scales at 1920kg.

How practical is the space inside?   8/10

Aside from the All-Terrain’s rugged looks, the greatest departure from E-Class Estate tradition is the omission of the third row of seats, which makes this one a strict five-seater.

With an extra 130 litres (VDA) over the sedan with the seats up to total 670 litres (VDA). With an extra 130 litres (VDA) over the sedan with the seats up to total 670 litres (VDA).

One could argue that the Estate’s traditional rearward-facing third row is a bit old school next to the forward-facing setup used by seven-seat SUVs like the GLS, but it's a shame given the third row is still available in other markets.

The All-Terrain does offer a vast cargo area however, with an extra 130 litres (VDA) over the sedan with the seats up to total 670 litres (VDA). Seats down, this extends to 1820 litres (VDA), but it’s worth noting that both wagon figures are marginally smaller than the previous Estate’s 695/1950 measurements.

Facilitating full use of this space is the classic Merc Estate retractable cargo net, and a 670kg payload promises good scope for loading beyond a full passenger count. The air suspension will also automatically maintain a level ride height regardless of load.

Seats down, this extends to 1820 litres (VDA). Seats down, this extends to 1820 litres (VDA).

As with all current E-Classes, there are bottle holders in each door plus two cupholders front and back and ISOFIX child seat mounts in the outward rear positions.

As per the non-AMG Mercedes passenger car norm, run flat tyres take the place of a spare tyre, but a space saver can be optioned to sit above the boot floor.

Does it represent good value for the price? What features does it come with?   7/10

The All-Terrain theme follows the same path taken by key rivals Audi and Volvo with the A6 Allroad ($112,855) and V90 Cross Country ($99,900), which leaves BMW’s upcoming 5 Series Touring as the sole option in this segment not to adopt the semi-SUV look.

As with all current E-Classes, there are bottle holders in each door, two cupholders, and ISOFIX child seat mounts. As with all current E-Classes, there are bottle holders in each door, two cupholders, and ISOFIX child seat mounts.

The $109,900 Mercedes is priced right between the Audi and Volvo, but note that the Audi brings a more powerful V6 to justify its slight premium.

The All-Terrain is available with a V6 internationally, but the 220 d four-cylinder diesel was selected for Australia as it's the closest match for the E 250 d that proved the most popular variant last time around.

Compared with a similarly specified E 220 d sedan (which kicks off at $92,900), Mercedes reckons they're about the same on price, but the All-Terrain throws in the wagon body and all-wheel drive pretty much for free. The All-Terrain also offers a significant value improvement over the previous E 250 d Estate which bowed out at $107,900.

Aside from the rugged looks, the greatest departure from E-Class Estate tradition is the omission of the third row of seats. Aside from the rugged looks, the greatest departure from E-Class Estate tradition is the omission of the third row of seats.

Key inclusions for the All-Terrain over the already opulent E-Class are genuine leather trim, proximity unlocking, widescreen dash instrument that spans two thirds of the cabin, LED 'Multibeam' headlights, underbody protection and 20-inch twinned five-spoke alloys.

What are the key stats for the engine and transmission?   8/10

The All-Terrain’s excellent 2.0-litre turbo-diesel engine and nine-speed torque converter auto are carried across from the E 220 d sedan, which produces a decent 143kW/400Nm. Max torque is available from 1600-2800rpm.

The All-Terrain is the only Australian E-Class to pair this engine with the '4Matic' all-wheel drivetrain though, which uses a slightly rear-biased (45/55) torque split in this application.

How much fuel does it consume?   9/10

The All-Terrain’s extra 240kg and no doubt less slippery body add 1.6L/100km to the E 220 d sedan official combined fuel consumption figure, but the wagon’s 5.7L/100km claim is still very impressive for a taller body nudging two tonnes. 

At this rate, the E-Class All-Terrain has a theoretical range of 1157km from its 66-litre fuel tank.

What's it like to drive?   8/10

Climbing aboard the All-Terrain, there’s a sense you're seated higher than its 29mm static ride height lift suggests. It's probably mostly psychological, and borne from the All-Terrain styling treatment, but something SUV fans will probably appreciate.

The steering also feels slightly heavier, adding to the All-Terrain’s semi-SUV aura. The steering also feels slightly heavier, adding to the All-Terrain’s semi-SUV aura.

Otherwise it's mainly W213-generation E-Class from the driver's seat, which is a very good thing.

However, the extra 240kg of Estate body and All-Terrain spec over a regular E 220 d sedan is just enough to put a dent in the 2.0-litre diesel's performance. Mercedes claims an 8.0sec 0-100km/h figure, which is still more than enough to keep up with traffic, but just not as spritely as the sedan’s 7.3sec figure.

The combination of airbag suspension and the All-Terrain’s slightly taller tyre sidewalls help the wagon ride commendably well. There's no disguising the large-diameter 20-inch wheels over sharp potholes, but the experience is generally even better than we recall from any other existing E-Class.

The steering also feels slightly heavier, as though the level of assistance has been tuned for a touch more weight to add to the All-Terrain’s semi-SUV aura. If our perception is correct, it only adds to the sense of substance from the driver’s seat.

The excellent 2.0-litre turbo-diesel engine and nine-speed torque converter auto are carried across from the E 220 d sedan. The excellent 2.0-litre turbo-diesel engine and nine-speed torque converter auto are carried across from the E 220 d sedan.

Its overall composure is maintained on dirt too, with the All-Terrain’s Victorian launch route offering a good dose of gravel and muddy unsealed roads. The all-wheel drive system keeps you pointing where you want and enables clean acceleration from the greasiest of corners. All of this highlights the All-Terrain’s potential as a ski field chaser.

We also detoured via some moderate fire trails, which gave us the chance to try the All-Terrain driving mode that lifts the suspension an extra 20mm and slackens the stability control and ABS to better suit low grip scenarios.

At speeds above 35km/h it reverts to Comfort mode, but will return to All-Terrain settings if you slow down again. In Sport mode or above 125km/h, the suspension lowers 15mm below normal to reduce aerodynamic drag. Even at full height it won’t challenge a GLE for clearance, but it’s significantly more capable than regular E-Class models.

Warranty & Safety Rating

Basic Warranty

3 years / unlimited km warranty

ANCAP Safety Rating

ANCAP logo

What safety equipment is fitted? What safety rating?   10/10

Like all versions of the current E-Class, the All-Terrain carries the maximum five star ANCAP and EuroNCAP safety ratings. A brilliantly integrated suite of active and passive safety features represents the forefront of occupant and pedestrian protection, which goes well beyond its AEB, nine-airbag count, 360-degree parking cameras, rear cross-traffic alerts, and a pedestrian-protecting active bonnet.

These systems work in harmony to enable semi-autonomous driving, which is perhaps the greatest technical advancement of cars since we stopped riding horses.

What does it cost to own? What warranty is offered?   8/10

The E220 d All-Terrain is covered by Mercedes’ three-year, unlimited kilometre warranty, with service intervals pegged at either 12 months or a generous 25,000km.

Mercedes is yet to confirm capped service pricing for Australia, but we don’t expect the All-Terrain to stray too far from the $556, $1112 and $1112 figures applied to the E220 d sedan’s first three services.

Verdict

Given Mercedes-Benz's rich heritage with station wagons, it is a bit of a shame Australia’s preference for SUVs has reduced the line-up to just one variant this time around.

I'm glad they've picked the All-Terrain to fly the flag though, and Merc wagon loyalists should appreciate the extra versatility of its dirt road ability - if they're not mourning the loss of the extra two seats in the rear. Like the rest of the current E-Class range, the E 220 d All-Terrain is an excellent product overall.

Does the idea of an off-road flavoured E-Class wagon appeal to you over a fully fledged SUV like the GLE? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

Pricing Guides

$84,719
Based on 46 cars listed for sale in the last 6 months
Lowest Price
$59,995
Highest Price
$139,890

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
E200 2.0L, PULP, 7 SP AUTO $65,990 – 69,990 2017 MERCEDES-BENZ E-CLASS 2017 E200 Pricing and Specs
E400 4MATIC 3.0L, PULP, 9 SP AUTO $116,800 – 139,890 2017 MERCEDES-BENZ E-CLASS 2017 E400 4MATIC Pricing and Specs
E400 Night Edition 3.0L, PULP, 7 SP AUTO $94,710 – 108,900 2017 MERCEDES-BENZ E-CLASS 2017 E400 Night Edition Pricing and Specs
E200 2.0L, PULP, 7 SP AUTO $65,990 – 69,990 2017 MERCEDES-BENZ E-CLASS 2017 E200 Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
8.3
Design8
Practicality8
Price and features7
Engine & trans8
Fuel consumption9
Driving8
Safety10
Ownership8
Malcolm Flynn
CarsGuide Editor

Share

Pricing Guide

$62,920

Lowest price, based on third party pricing data

Have you considered?
Check out more Wagons
View cars for sale