Browse over 9,000 car reviews

Sorry, there are no cars that match your search

Search Pricing & Specifications

Search

2020 Toyota HiLux Pricing and Specs

2020 Toyota HiLux
Pricing starts from

$22,325

Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

The Toyota Hilux 2020 prices range from $22,325 for the basic trim level Ute HiLux Workmate to $64,490 for the top of the range Ute HiLux Rugged X (4X4).

The Toyota Hilux 2020 is available in Diesel and Regular Unleaded Petrol. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the Ute 2.7L 5 SP Manual to the Ute 2.8L 6 SP Automatic.

A new generation of the Toyota Hilux Ute was released this year.

Filter by:

Ute

Toyota HiLux Models SPECS PRICE
Rogue (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $62,490
Rugged (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $57,865
Rugged (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $55,865
Rugged X (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $64,490
Rugged X (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $62,490
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $48,250
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $44,590
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $52,160
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $50,660
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $42,590
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $46,250
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $50,010
SR (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $48,510
SR Hi-Rider 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $44,210
SR Hi-Rider 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $45,230
SR Hi-Rider 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $43,230
SR+ (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $54,160
SR+ (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $52,010
SR5 (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $58,400
SR5 (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $58,420
SR5 (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $59,920
SR5 (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $57,290
SR5 Hi-Rider 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $53,690
SR5+ (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $62,420
SR5+ (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed automatic $60,920
SR5+ (4X4) 2.8LDiesel6 speed manual $60,420
Workmate 2.7LRegular Unleaded Petrol6 speed automatic $25,590
Workmate 2.7LRegular Unleaded Petrol6 speed automatic $35,070
Workmate 2.7LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $23,590
Workmate 2.7LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $33,070
Workmate (4x4) 2.4LDiesel6 speed automatic $45,220
Workmate (4x4) 2.4LDiesel6 speed automatic $48,790
Workmate (4x4) 2.4LDiesel6 speed automatic $47,290
Workmate (4x4) 2.4LDiesel6 speed manual $39,520
Workmate (4x4) 2.4LDiesel6 speed manual $46,790
Workmate HI-Rider 2.4LDiesel6 speed automatic $42,160
Workmate HI-Rider 2.4LDiesel6 speed manual $28,830
Workmate HI-Rider 2.4LDiesel6 speed manual $40,160
* Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price

Disclaimer: Glass's Information Services (GIS) and Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd. (carsguide) provide this information based on data from a range of sources including third parties. Whilst all care has been taken to ensure its accuracy and reliability, GIS and carsguide do not warrant or represent that the information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon this information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.

To the maximum extent permitted by law, GIS and carsguide exclude all liability for any direct, indirect, special or incidental loss, damage, expense or injury resulting from, arising out of, or in connection with your use of or reliance upon this information.

Toyota HiLux 2020 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Toyota HiLux here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • When is the 2021 Toyota HiLux SR5+ being released?

    The facelifted HiLux is in showrooms now, Jay, including the SR5+ model. The good news is that the suspension has been refined to improve ride and the engine has been given a once-over with a larger turbocharger to boost power to 150kW. Toyota also claims it has addressed the diesel particulate filter problems that were an issue for owners of the previous version. Prices start at around $60,000 and up for the model you’re interested in. The good news is that the Extra-Cab layout is available in SR5 trim and while it doesn’t offer the full interior space of a dual-cab, the two small occasional seats in the rear do bump its seating capacity to four.

    Show more
  • What is the fuel consumption for a 1999 Toyota Hilux?

    An accurate comparison with contemporary competitors to the HiLux is very hard to find as these cars were built at a time when light commercial vehicles weren’t being officially tested for fuel economy as they are today. Suffice to say that fuel economy won’t be as good as a more modern vehicle with more modern engine technology and management electronics.

    About the closest I can get you is a 2003 HiLux dual-cab with the 2.7-litre engine which has an official combined economy figure of 11.1 litres per 100km. But while there’s a handful of years between your car and the one I’ve just quoted, the comparison is actually relatively meaningful as the HiLux in either case is essentially the same vehicle with the same basic engine.

    The thing to remember with all these official figures is that they really only stand up as a direct comparison to other vehicles of a similar type when tested against the same criteria. In the real world, you’ll really battle to get anything like the claimed fuel economy number and I’d expect a HiLux like the one you have to use at least 11 litres per 100km on the highway and closer to 14 litres or even more around the suburbs.

    Show more
  • What dual cab 4x4 ute should I buy?

    The problem with all these vehicles, Darren, is that they seem to have covered huge distances (200,000km is a lot for a car that is just eight years old, no?). Also, some of them have covered those kilometres towing huge, heavy trailers and a full tray at the same time. So, the first piece of advice is to buy one that has a full service history and hasn’t been worked half to death. A Ranger with a huge bull-bar, suspension lift, winch and mud tyres, for instance, is a dead certainty to have been thrashed through the bush every weekend of its life. So be careful and take each vehicle on its merits and overall condition.

    It seems you’ve heard of the Ranger’s engine troubles (overheating due to faulty EGR coolers and failed fuel injectors) but the Toyota three-litre turbo-diesel is not without its faults either. Cracked pistons between 100,000km and 150,000km are not unknown and, like any common-rail diesel, the Toyota’s engine can consume injectors at a frightening rate. The bottom line is that all these modern common-rail diesels are highly tuned and absolutely need their maintenance. Even then, they can fail, so it’s worth knowing.

    For your purposes, Darren, I think the Ranger with its more powerful engine (147kW and 470Nm plays the Toyota’s 120kW and 343Nm) and much greater towing capacity (3500kg for the Ford, 2250kg for the Toyota) would be the smarter way to go.

    Show more
See All Toyota HiLux FAQs
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.