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Australia's fastest police car! BMW M5 Competition joins the Highway Patrol fleet in Victoria


Victoria Police has redefined the term 'hot fuzz', welcoming the bahn-storming BMW M5 Competition to the highway patrol fleet.

BMW already provides the more sedate, and diesel-powered, 5 Series to the Australia's police fleets, but the brand's M5 Competition (prcied at $229,900) will rank among the country's most performance-focused pursuit vehicles. 

It's speed is thanks to the German powerhouse's massive 4.4-litre V8 engine, which produces a monstrous 460kW and 750Nm. That power is shuffled to all four wheels via an eight-speed automatic.

And as you might have guessed, that makes BMW's angriest 5 Series mighty fast, indeed. In fact, 100km/h will whistle past the windows in a blistering 3.3 seconds, and while most Australian-delivered vehicles are limited to 250km/h, the Police-spec M5 gets a full 305km/h unlocked - making it the fastest police car, in terms of top speed, anywhere in Australia.

“Since cooperating in the deployment of BMW 5 Series patrol vehicles in 2018, BMW Group Australia has enjoyed working closely with Victoria Police,” says BMW Australia's CEO, Vikram Pawah.

“Now with the incredible BMW M5 Competition entering Victoria Police service, the performance level has jumped up the scale. When combined with the safety of the xDrive four-wheel drive system, the M5’s all-round ability... makes it a natural fit for dynamic police duties."

BMW says the M5 Competition is "fully operational" as a Highway Patrol vehicle, but is yet to go into specifics about the modifications that have taken place.

This German monster joins several other high-powered patrol cars that have replaced the homegrown Ford Falcon and Holden Commodore. Sydney Police use the V8-powered Chrysler 300 SRT Core, while NT Police have taken delivery of the twin-turbo V6-powered Kia Stinger.

Is the M5 Competition the best replacement for the Commodore SS on police fleets? Tell us in the comments below.