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2021 Toyota Yaris and Yaris Cross Hybrid recalled: New hatchbacks and SUVs could lose power

The Yaris Cross light SUV might only be a recent addition to Toyota showrooms, but it’s already been recalled.

Toyota Australia has recalled hybrid versions of the recently launched new-generation Yaris hatchback and related Yaris Cross SUV, with both having the potential to lose power when driven.

“Within the hybrid transmission of involved vehicles, an improper application of anti-corrosion oil on the transmission input damper may cause abnormal slippage during rapid acceleration,” according to Toyota Australia.

“This may cause the warning light to illuminate and subsequently potentially cause the hybrid system to stop.”

In total, 1295 combined examples of the Yaris and Yaris Cross built between October 18, 2019, and September 25, 2020, have been called back. Of note, only 696 vehicles have been sold, with the rest still in the custody and control of Toyota Australia and its dealer network.

Affected owners will be contacted by Toyota Australia with instructions to book their vehicle in at a preferred dealership for a free-of-charge inspection and repair, with the transmission input damper taking about 8.5 hours to replace.

Meanwhile, the Yaris Cross has been called back for a second time, with 2341 examples produced between April 30 and October 14, 2020, possibly facing a rear centre seatbelt issue. For reference, just 1007 units have found homes.

“In the rear centre seat, there is a possibility that the seatbelt may be damaged by the sharp edge of the metal seatbelt anchor bracket during the impact of a collision, due to improper manufacturing of the bracket,” according to Toyota Australia.

Impacted owners will be offered to have complimentary protective material added to the anchor bracket.

Nonetheless, those looking for further information on either recall can call Toyota Australia’s Recall Campaign Hotline on 1800 987 366. Alternatively, they can reach out to their preferred dealership.

But before they do, a full list of affected Vehicle Identification Numbers (VINs) for the first and second recalls can be found here and here respectively.