It was a dream come true. The opportunity to drive a supercar on one of the most famous race tracks in the world. We're talking about Fuji Speedway in Japan and of course Japan's very own supercar the $700,000 V10 powered Lexus LFA.

THE TRACK

The Speedway sitting in the shadow of Mount Fuji was the scene of the most famous encounters in motor racing history when Formula One stars James Hunt and Niki Lauda went head to head in the 70s. Victory went to Hunt who went on to win the championship after Lauda pulled out of the race because of the wet, dangerous conditions. The clash has been immortalised in the recent Ron Howard film Rush.

Built in 1963, Fuji speedway has had a chequered history during which it has closed and reopened a number of times. Reopened in 2005 after a two year transformation, the new 4.56km course incorporates a 1.5km straightaway – one of the longest straights of any race track in the world.

THE CARS

It was our first time at the Fuji circuit and Lexus had not one, but six of the stove hot Ferrari competitors on hand, with a total value of more than $3.2 million. Also available to drive was the fully blown Pikes Peak IS F CCS-R race car as well as the IS-F road car itself. But it was the LFA that stole our hearts. Only 500 examples of the car were built before production ceased in December last year and just 10 of them have found their way to Australia, although Lexus says it could have easily sold more had it been able to get them.

Our drive car wasn't in any old LFA either, but in the super quick Nurburgring special edition with 420kW of power, or 570 horsepower in the old money -- more power than your average V8 supercar. Only 50 LFAs with the Nurburgring Package were produced, a lighter more focused track model with the power boosted from 412 to 420kW and sitting 10mm lower, with a larger fixed wing and deeper front air dam.

Regardless, the LFA spins out to 9000 revs in the blink of an eye and sprints from rest to 100km/h in just 3.7 seconds. Long and sleek, the 4.8-litre mid-mounted V10 in the LFA is paired with a six-speed sequential auto, with paddle shifters, 20 inch alloys and huge, carbon-ceramic brakes.

THE DRIVE

We've driven many fast and expensive cars over the years but the LFA is right up there with the best of them. Still, when your speed is topping 250km screaming down the home straight and the sign warning brake now flashes into view it's hard not to jump on the brakes -- and jump hard -- before the tight right-hander waiting at the end arrives.

It's a confidence thing, and the more we drove the LFA the more our confidence began to grow, then just as quickly as it began our time in the LFA was over -- fortunately without incident. An "off" in this car would have been expensive to say the least, not to mention the embarrassment of being the guy that troweled the LFA -- no sir, not a good look.

You get what you pay for and the LFA makes average drivers look like superstars, sitting low and flat through corners with effortless acceleration and prodigious levels of mid-corner grip. Make no mistake, this is a thoroughbred. It's a car built for the track and one that has had its fair share of success at the Nurburgring.

But I have to confess it is actually my second time behind the wheel of the LFA and hours later I can't wait for number three. The tragedy is that we may never see its like again, with ever-tightening emissions regulations, the focus switching to turbocharged and hybrid powertrains and no plans to build a replacement model any time soon.

Lexus LFA
Price: from $700,000
Engine: 4.8-litre mid-mounted V10, 420kW
Transmission: 6-speed sequential auto
0-100km/h: 3.7 seconds