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Holden confirms Melbourne engine plant to shut down one year before Commodore

Holden has confirmed the V6 engine plant in Port Melbourne will close in December.

Holden confirms Port Melbourne engine plant to shut down one year before Commodore factory closes.

Holden has confirmed the V6 engine plant in Port Melbourne will close in December, almost one year before the Holden Commodore reaches the end of the production line.

Approximately 200 workers at the Port Melbourne facility will be made redundant with the shutdown.

Holden has been making engines since 1948 but the Port Melbourne facility has been making engines for Holden and other brands in the General Motors world since 1981.

As reported by News Corp Australia last month, Holden will stockpile the V6 engines to be installed in the Elizabeth-made Commodore next year, although the company is expecting a large swing to V8 models as enthusiasts buy what many view as collector pieces.

Holden says V8 models now account for more than one-third of Commodore sales -- the highest ratio in the nameplate's history.

Mark Bernhard also announced five new models in the next five months, including a new Holden Astra.

But the imported sedan that will replace the Commodore in late 2017 will not have a V8 option and instead come with a choice of four-cylinder and V6 power.

In a briefing to media in Melbourne overnight, the boss of Holden, Mark Bernhard, also announced five new models in the next five months, including a new Holden Astra.

Holden said it plans to change its "Aussie" image because "our appeal needs to be more multicultural" to reflect the changing population and the changing taste in cars.

Holden was last market leader 14 years ago, is due to post its lowest sales in 23 years and is outside the Top Three sellers for the first time in its history.

"We need to show today's Australia who we are and why they should buy a Holden," he said.

What do you think of Holden's plans for a new line up? Will anything be better than a homegrown Commodore? Tell us what you think in the comments below.