Hyundai Problems

No car is perfect, but we've gathered everything relating to the Hyundai reliability here to help you decide if it's a smart buy.

Which mid-size, diesel SUV should I buy?

Answered by CarsGuide 5 May 2021

Mazda’s SUV range (CX-5 and CX-8) are popular with their owners and have a good reputation in the trade. Crucially, they’re also available with a turbo-diesel engine, so they fit your criteria on that basis. We’d also suggest you take a good look at the South Korean brands’ offerings (Hyundai and Kia) as these are also highly rated by the trade and those companies have been involved with small-capacity diesel engines for decades, so the technology is pretty well sorted.

It’s interesting that you’ve had a good run from your Holden Captiva as that is far from the experience of many owners and former owners of this particular vehicle. As the Captiva ages it is very likely to start giving trouble, so the best advice is to trade up to a newer vehicle sooner rather than later.

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Why is it hard to star my Hyundai i30?

Answered by CarsGuide 5 May 2021

The hard starting and loss of power sound to me like a problem with the fuel pick-up or the fuel pump. In your Hyundai, the fuel filter is part of the pump assembly and lives in the actual fuel tank. Replacing the filter involves removing the pump from the tank, changing the filter and then replacing the whole assembly into the tank. If a hose has been crimped or an air leak introduced into this system, the pump may not be able to supply the engine with all the fuel it needs. A cold start-up is when an engine will suffer from this leak, while tight turns on a roundabout could be enough to starve the engine of fuel if the pick-up (the hose that dips into the petrol in the tank) isn’t in the right position inside the tank. The fact that these problems started when the car received a new fuel filter is a pretty good clue that something was not quite right when the car was put back together. I’d be going back to the workshop that fitted the filter, explaining the problem and giving the shop the opportunity to put things right.

The noise in your steering system is almost certainly due to a well known problem with these cars. The electrically-assisted steering system in your car uses a rubber coupling which can deteriorate over time. When this happens, a click or clunk can be heard. The solution is to have the rubber coupling replaced. Because the problem didn’t cause steering failure, Hyundai didn’t issue a recall for this, but a batch of earlier i30s (some cars built in 2007 and 2008) did have a steering coupling that could fail completely, leading to a loss of steering., These were recalled by Hyundai as part of a safety recall back in 2014.

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Hyundai i35 - Did this model ever exist?

Answered by CarsGuide 21 Apr 2021

The answer is no, but Hyundai's naming policy was very confusing during the 2010s.

The original i30 of 2007 introduced the alphanumerical naming policy and signified a different approach to vehicle engineering, with a European focus with higher-quality engineering rather than a low price to take on class leaders like on the Volkswagen Golf.

Thus 'i' something became a sort of premium nomenclature, and of course is still used to denote this on models like the i30 and Europe's i10 and i20 small cars There was also the German-engineered i40 midsized sedan and wagon until 2018.

But here's where Hyundai muddied its own waters.

In 2010 the larger, American-market Sonata was rebadged i45 for Australia and New Zealand – even though an 'x' and a '5' rather than a '0' meant crossover or SUV, as illustrated by the very popular second-generation Tucson being renamed ix35 in Australia and some other markets from 2009 to 2015 – though this naming policy was abandoned for the third-generation Tucson from 2015. While strikingly styled, there was nothing European about the i45, and it too returned to being badged Sonata from 2015.

So... i10, 120, i30, i40 and i45 for Australia, but no i35.

Thank you.

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Should I buy a 2021 Hyundai Kona or 2021 VW T-Roc?

Answered by CarsGuide 21 Apr 2021

Volkswagen’s latest cars are lovely to drive but it’s true; many mechanics (and plenty of owners) are wary of the brand’s recent reputation for reliability. But if you’re buying a brand-new or nearly new example, then the factory warranty will be some peace of mind. The safest bet right now, is something Japanese or South Korean, and that includes the Hyundai you’re looking at as well as the equivalent offerings from Kia. Both these brands have enviable reputations for durability and both come with terrific factory warranties.

Volkswagen’s current high-tech turbocharged engines are very entertaining to drive as well as being frugal in all situations, but, in reality, any current model mid-sized SUV is more than capable of delivering you interstate in comfort and safety as well as offering low running costs. Bear in mind you may have to pay extra for the top-shelf model if you want all the latest safety and convenience technology.

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Should I buy a 2013 Hyundai i30?

Answered by CarsGuide 21 Apr 2021

That’s actually not a lot of kilometres for a modern car, even a small hatchback like a Hyundai i30. Modern cars are actually a lot more durable in the long term than older ones, so I wouldn’t be worried about the distance travelled. Given that the average car in Australia travels about 15,000km a year, 108,000 is actually about right for a car that’s now eight years old.

That said, the car’s chances of being reliable for the next few years will pivot on how it has been maintained by its previous owners. Make sure the car you buy has a full service history with no gaps in that document suggesting it has missed any scheduled preventative maintenance. Unfortunately, many people who purchase budget cars like the Hyundai tend to maintain them in a similar way and that often means corners are cut. But if the service history is intact and complete, there’s no reason to suspect the car won’t offer years of reliable service. The price you’ve been quoted seems about right for the car in question.

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My 2017 Hyundai Tucson won't unlock, is it a problem with the key or the car?

Answered by CarsGuide 15 Apr 2021

It could be either the car or the remote-control unit at fault, and it’s impossible to tell without actually examining the vehicle. A remote-control unit with a battery that is low on voltage can cause all sorts of mysterious problems with a car’s central locking. But it’s also possible that the vehicle’s body-computer (which controls all the functions involved in unlocking and starting the car) could be malfunctioning also. If that’s the case, it will be a much more involved and expensive job than changing the battery in a remote-control unit.

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Why is my 2020 Hyundai i30 misfiring?

Answered by CarsGuide 24 Mar 2021

This sounds like a problem that should be easily solvable by having your Hyundai dealership electronically scan the car and interpreting the fault codes that result. This can’t be done by the side of the road or in your driveway, so I doesn’t surprise me that your road-service provider hasn’t had much success.

Fundamentally, though, it’s simply not good enough for the dealership to continue to tell you it can’t find a problem. This is a brand-new car and it’s expected to perform faultlessly or, at the very least, to a standard that does not give your partner cause to refuse to drive it. The car is under warranty, so Hyundai is obliged to fix it. If you’re not happy with your dealership’s approach, I’d suggest calling Hyundai’s customer service department. Hyundai guards its reputation very closely in Australia, and isn’t likely to let a case like yours damage that.

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Should I buy a Hyundai Kona or Honda HR-V?

Answered by CarsGuide 18 Mar 2021

It’s nice to see that the worldwide web has put Carsguide in touch with people in the USA and that they’re prepared to ask for advice from half a planet away. Meanwhile, if safety is your number one priority, then you really need to find a vehicle with all the latest driver aids such as autonomous emergency braking, lane-keeping assistance and rear-cross-traffic alert. These are the new safety must-haves now that air-bags, stability control and other systems are considered par for the course.

The catch with your situation (from our point of view) is that the vehicles we assess and test in Australia don’t necessarily correlate with the North American buying experience. The specifications of Australian-delivered cars don’t always line up with those of a USA-market vehicle, and that can mean that the safety kit fitted here isn’t mirrored by the same make and model sold on your side of the pond. Don’t forget, too, that some makes and models (Hyundai and Kia are good examples) often feature Australian input into the suspension and steering settings to make them more palatable to an Australian audience. As a result, the same car without that input (such as the version sold in the US) might drive very differently.

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Does my 2012 Hyundai i30 petrol need a timing belt change at 100,000km?

Answered by CarsGuide 10 Mar 2021

Petrol versions of the Hyundai i30 from this era have a rubber, toothed timing-belt. This is a clean, quiet running arrangement, but it does require replacement at 90,000km intervals. The advice is to change the tensioners, associated pulleys and the engine’s water pump at the same time as all these components wear out and are located in the same general area, making it a smart move to do all this work in one hit, rather than pull the engine apart a second time.

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Hyundai Tucson diesel problems

Answered by CarsGuide 10 Mar 2021

The Hyundai brand has developed an enviable reputation in this country for reliability and quality. The brand’s warranty is also excellent, taking away even more buyer anxiety. With that in mind, the decision to go diesel or petrol comes down to the way you use the vehicle.

This applies to all brands, not just Hyundai, but if all (or most of) your driving will be urban or suburban based, then the petrol engine is for you. Yes, you’ll use a little more fuel than the diesel variant, but servicing costs could be a little lower and you’ll avoid the modern turbo-diesel’s biggest downfall; a blocked Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF).

The DPF is an emissions device that traps the soot from the diesel engine and burns it off at a later date. The problem with that is that the DPF can only burn off the soot and regenerate itself if the engine (and exhaust system) gets to a temperature high enough for this to happen. In urban running, that doesn’t just doesn’t happen, at which point the on-board computer will either try to force a regeneration (not always successful) or the DPF will have to be manually cleaned or even replaced (and that’s costly).

The bottom line, then, is that a turbo-diesel (even a modern one) is only for you if you will be driving the car at highway speeds for at least half an hour at least once a month (once a fortnight is better). If that’s how you use a car, then the diesel should be okay; if not, it’s petrol every time.

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