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1968 Mazda 1000
See our complete guide for the Mazda 1000

1968 Mazda 1000 Pricing and Specs

From
$1,150*

The Mazda 1000 1968 prices range from $1,150 for the basic trim level Sedan 1000 (base) to $3,300 for the top of the range Wagon 1000 (base).

The Mazda 1000 1968 comes in Coupe, Sedan and Wagon.

The Mazda 1000 1968 is available in Leaded Petrol.

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Coupe

Mazda 1000 Models SPECS PRICE
(base) 1.0LLeaded Petrol4 speed manual $1,900 – 3,300

Sedan

Mazda 1000 Models SPECS PRICE
(base) 1.0LLeaded Petrol4 speed manual $1,150 – 1,870

Wagon

Mazda 1000 Models SPECS PRICE
(base) 1.0LLeaded Petrol4 speed manual $1,900 – 3,300

Mazda 1000 1968 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Mazda here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Why is my 2015 Mazda BT-50 losing power?

    You can probably rule out anything like a split turbo hose as this would cause the vehicle to lose power all the time, not just after prolonged use. Modern turbo-diesels like the one in your car use a range of electronic sensors and controls to keep everything running properly. It could easily be that a sensor is sending erroneous messages to the computer. An electronic scan of the vehicle should offer some answers.

    The other possibility is that the fuel system is not keeping up with the engine over time. This could be due to a blocked filter, a blocked fuel line or return line or even a fuel pump overheating. A check of the fuel system would also be in order.

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  • How much should I pay to replace the transfer-case on my 2010 Mazda CX-9?

    I’m not in a position to guide you around the financial aspects of this problem, Joseph, but it remains that the transfer-case in this model Mazda has, indeed, earned a very patchy reputation. It seems that Mazda never specified an oil-change interval for the transfer-case and, over time, the oil can break down and lead to high operating temperatures and internal wear of the mechanical parts. This can include metal fragments breaking off and damaging other components, as well as the high temperatures causing fusing (damage) to the metal parts. In some cases, that can also damage the spline shaft that joins the transmission to the transfer-case and, if that happens, the transmission will also be severely damaged. This has been known to occur in cars with as little as 70,000km on board.

    The reason the transfer-case oil wasn’t changed when you had the car serviced is simply because that task is not listed as a service item for this car. Which was, remember, the problem in the first place. Most workshops now agree that the CX-9’s transfer-case oil be changed every 60,000km or so, but sadly, it seems that’s all a bit too late for you. There was a Special Service Bulletin issued for this problem in the USA, but don’t assume that this will also apply to Australian Mazdas. That said, I’d still be having a chat with Mazda Australia’s customer service department.

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  • Problems with engine failure in my 2010 Mazda 6

    This is a known problem in the Mazda turbo-diesel, and many owners have suffered similar failures. The problem begins with the formation of hard, carbon deposits in the top end of the engine which eventually find their way into the engine’s sump and block the oil pick-up. When that happens, the engine can’t pump oil efficiently and some parts of the engine become oil-starved. That’s when a build-up of friction and, therefore, heat, will cause a catastrophic failure with the attendant metal shavings that were subsequently discovered in your engine.

    So why was the problem missed? An enthusiastic mechanic will always have a look at the oil that comes out of an engine, looking for just the symptoms you’ve noted. A really keen technician will sometimes even cut the old oil filter open to check for anything that shouldn’t be there. Unfortunately, in the context of a busy workshop with price-conscious customers, this doesn’t always happen. In the Mazda’s engine, the normal practice should be to check the strainer that covers the oil pick-up, but, again, that may not have been the case with your engine. If the workshop you used was a Mazda dealership, I’d be asking management why that process wasn’t followed. Even then, it’s difficult to say whether this check would have saved your engine, as the damage may already have been done.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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