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More driving range for updated 2024 Mercedes-Benz EQA and EQB electric cars, but line-up is slimmed for BMW iX1 rivals

For both EQA and EQB, longer-range ‘250+’ variants replace the old ‘250’ base versions.

Mercedes-Benz Australia has confirmed pricing and a revised line-up for both the updated 2024 EQA and EQB electric cars, with new styling and previously optional features now standard.

While prices are up for the Mercedes EQA small SUV, additional features and increased driving range make up for the adjustment of $2600 over the outgoing version. The EQA250 is replaced by the EQA250+, which starts from $84,900 before on-road costs and boasts an extra 54km of claimed electric driving range - now a total 578km (under NEDC testing).

The EQA350 arrives from $102,900, a modest price increase of $321, while the larger EQB is now represented by a single variant, the EQB250+ from ($89,100 (+$1366) with an extra 57km of range (now 564km) and a third row of seats as standard - previously optional.

For each of the updated 250+ variants, a new ‘grille’ features a Mercedes-Benz star ‘constellation’ while new tail-light graphics are the give-away at the rear. Inside, both are equipped with current-gen Mercedes steering wheels with touch controls and Nappa leather, plus electrically adjustable front seats, panoramic sunroof and plenty of equipment carried over from the outgoing 250 variants.

Both are equipped with current-gen Mercedes steering wheels with touch controls and Nappa leather, and plenty of equipment carried over from the outgoing 250 variants.

They retain their front-wheel-drive electric motors that produce 140kW and 185Nm, each powered by a 70.5kWh battery. Adaptive suspension is also standard. 

Stepping up to the EQA350, the EQB equivalent of which has been discontinued for sale, nets buyers a more powerful all-wheel-drive dual-motor set up with 215kW and 520Nm, drawn from a 66.5kWh battery that allows a claimed 489km.

Both 250+ variants retain their front-wheel-drive electric motors that produce 140kW and 185Nm, each powered by a 70.5kWh battery.

Mercedes also says the EQA350 has a 0-100km/h sprint time of 6.0 seconds, while adding more features over the 250+ including a Burmester sound system, head-up display and a Driver Assistance Package with active steering assist, route-based speed adaptation, and automatic take-off for following lead cars in traffic.

The EQB250+ is now the only variant available, with the EQB350 discontinued in Australia.

Pricing for both new 250+ variants remains below the Luxury Car Tax (LCT) threshold, while the more minor update for the EQA350 has brought a smaller price increase, as shown in the tables below.

2024 Mercedes-Benz EQA pricing before on-road costs

VariantPrice

EQA250+

$84,900 (+$2600 vs EQA250)
EQA350 4Matic$102,900 (+$321)

2024 Mercedes-Benz EQB pricing before on-road costs

VariantPrice
EQB250+$89,100 (+$1366 vs EQB250)
Chris Thompson
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Racing video games, car-spotting on road trips, and helping wash the family VL Calais Turbo as a kid were all early indicators that an interest in cars would stay present in Chris’ life, but loading up his 1990 VW Golf GTI Mk2 and moving from hometown Brisbane to work in automotive publishing in Melbourne ensured cars would be a constant. With a few years as MOTOR Magazine’s first digital journalist under his belt, followed by a stint as a staff journalist for Wheels Magazine, Chris’ career already speaks to a passion for anything with four wheels, especially the 1989 Mazda MX-5 he currently owns. From spending entire weeks dissecting the dynamic abilities of sports cars to weighing up the practical options for car buyers from all walks of life, Chris’ love for writing and talking about cars means if you’ve got a motoring question, he can give you an answer.
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