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Mazda CX-8 2021 review

Mazda’s CX-8 is tweaked for 2021 with updates to tech and new variants such as this Touring SP.
EXPERT RATING
8.3
Mazda Australia changed the SUV game back in 2018 when it launched its segment-straddling seven-seat CX-8, but today competition in the crossover space is as fierce as ever. Do the updates in 2021 keep the CX-8 fresh against rivals such as the Mitsubishi Outlander and Nissan X-Trail?

Everybody wants an SUV these days, so to cater to a quickly growing and diverse audience, car brands need to offer more than just the usual small, medium and large varieties.

Enter Mazda's CX-8 SUV, which slides in between the CX-5 and CX-9, offering  the seven seats of the latter in a footprint closer in size to the former.

It’s a neat trick that Mazda pulls off, but are there any compromises to packaging, quality, value or comfort as a result? We spent some time in the new 2021 CX-8 Touring SP to find out.

Does it represent good value for the price? What features does it come with?   9/10

Mazda’s CX-8 has changed a lot since it was first introduced to local showrooms in mid-2018.

Back then, it was a diesel-only range, available in two grades, but now Mazda Australia offers the CX-8 across five trim levels, two engine choices and front- or all-wheel drive, for a total of 11 variants.

Opening the range is the Sport grade, available in petrol front-drive and diesel all-wheel-drive forms for $39,990 before on-road costs for the petrol and $46,990 for the diesel AWD.

The Touring SP adds $1000 ontop on the standard Touring. (Touring SP variant pictured) The Touring SP adds $1000 ontop on the standard Touring. (Touring SP variant pictured)

The Touring is also available in petrol FWD and diesel AWD versions, priced at $46,790 and $53,790, while new for 2021 is the Touring SP, which builds on the second-to-bottom grade for an extra $1000.

Meanwhile, the GT trim is a diesel-only affair, in front ($59,290) and all-wheel-drive ($64,290) flavours.

The Sport, Touring and Touring SP all wear 17-inch alloy wheels. (Touring SP variant pictured) The Sport, Touring and Touring SP all wear 17-inch alloy wheels. (Touring SP variant pictured)

The diesel-only Asaki tops the CX-8 line-up, in FWD ($62,790) and AWD ($66,790), but Mazda has also introduced the new Asaki LE range-topper that bumps up pricing to $69,920.

We’ll dig into the engine specs a bit further down, but standard equipment is impressive, thanks to the likes of tri-zone climate control, a head-up display, and an 8.0-inch multimedia system with satellite navigation, digital radio and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto support.

The Touring SP has a 8.0-inch multimedia system. (Touring SP varaint pictured) The Touring SP has a 8.0-inch multimedia system. (Touring SP varaint pictured)

Less impressive on the base Sport grade are the 17-inch wheels and black-cloth interior, but a sub-$40,000 seven-seat SUV needs to make compromises somewhere.

Stepping up to the Touring adds more upmarket features such as keyless entry, push-button start, power-adjustable front seats, heated front seats and leather interior.

Our test car, the Touring SP, differs thanks to red-contrast stitching for the interior, suede accents for the seats and dashboard, and heated rear seats, as well as blacked-out exterior elements (more on that below).

The Touring SP adds red-contrast stitching for the interior. (Touring SP variant pictured) The Touring SP adds red-contrast stitching for the interior. (Touring SP variant pictured)

The GT grade scores a larger 10.25-inch multimedia system, wireless smartphone charger, powered tailgate, wood interior trim, sunroof, 10-speaker Bose sound system and steering wheel paddle shifters.

Finally, the Asaki nabs a 7.0-inch driver display, Nappa leather interior, cooled front seats and a heated steering wheel, while the Asaki LE swaps out the second-row bench seat for two heated captain’s chairs and a bespoke centre console with cupholders and USB ports.

No matter how you slice it, this is an impressive equipment list, on any grade you go for, but we will point out that prices are up this year (from $80-$1350) across the line-up.

Is there anything interesting about its design?   8/10

The CX-8 clearly belongs in the Mazda SUV family, wearing the same understated yet elegant design language found on the smaller CX-5 and larger CX-9.

In fact, the CX-8 can be a little hard to differentiate from either of its siblings from a distance, so if you like what Mazda has done with its crossovers, you’ll like the look of the CX-8.

Personally, I like the styling of the CX-8, with its sleek headlights and taillights adding a bit of aggression to the aesthetic, while the chrome-trim found on the grille and window surrounds adds a touch of class.

The Touring SP sports a number of blacked-out elements. (Touring SP variant pictured) The Touring SP sports a number of blacked-out elements. (Touring SP variant pictured)

The 19-inch wheels found in the more expensive grades do look much better than the 17-inch units on the Sport and Touring, however, and fill the wheel arches much better.

Our Touring SP also sports a number of blacked-out elements on the exterior to set it apart, including around the grille, the windows and the wheels.

We think it looks great, especially when contrasting against our test car’s Polymetal Grey colour, but we will point out that higher grades like the GT and Asaki nab a new grille that looks much more upmarket than the one fitted here.

The CX-8 clearly belongs in the Mazda SUV family. (Touring SP variant pictured) The CX-8 clearly belongs in the Mazda SUV family. (Touring SP variant pictured)

It’s not just the outside that will be familiar to Mazda customers, as the interior mirrors much of the CX-5 and CX-8 as well.

Everything is laid out in a clear and easy to use fashion, and controls and ergonomics are spot on for the driver.

The Touring SP scores a number of nice touches on the inside, too, including suede accents and red-stitched highlights that do a lot to elevate the standard black-cloth interior.

The Touring SP scores a number of nice touches on the inside. (Touring SP variant pictured) The Touring SP scores a number of nice touches on the inside. (Touring SP variant pictured)

Out test car is also fitted with an 8.0-inch multimedia system, but having experienced the larger 10.25-inch unit of higher grades recently, the bigger version is a vast improvement in terms of looks.

Overall, the CX-8 plays it a little safe with design, but it still  looks distinct and upmarket, like all Mazda SUVs

How practical is the space inside?   9/10

Measuring 4900mm long, 1840mm wide, 1725mm tall and with a 2930mm wheelbase, the CX-8 is classified as a large SUV, but its width is actually the same as a one-size-smaller CX-5.

The length is closer to a CX-9, while the wheelbase is identical to its larger sibling, which means the CX-8 offers the practicality and space of a seven seater, but is easier to manoeuvre around town.

There are large door bins. (Touring SP variant pictured) There are large door bins. (Touring SP variant pictured)

From the front seats, the cabin feels light and airy, thanks to a large glasshouse, while storage options extend to large door bins, a deep centre-storage cubby, two cupholders and a small tray for your phone/wallet.

The second-row seats also offer plenty of room for adults and will even slide forward and recline to get into the perfect position.

There is plenty of head and legroom, even for those sitting in the middle seat, but shoulder room can be a little compromised.

The second-row seats also offer plenty of room for adults. (Touring SP variant pictured) The second-row seats also offer plenty of room for adults. (Touring SP variant pictured)

For those that seldom use the second-row middle seat, the Asaki LE features two captains’ chairs that are much more comfortable for adults, and even features ISOFIX and top-tether points for child seats.

In the second row, there are small door bins, a fold-down armrest with cupholders and air vents with climate controls, while the Asaki LE scores its own unique centre console with functions for seat heating.

The second-row doors are also a bit bigger than a CX-5, making ingress/egress to the third row a little easier, but it also means it can be trickier to get in and out of tighter parking spaces.

But if you are considering a CX-8, it’s probably because there is a third row of seats, and they are just what you’d expect.

Children shouldn’t have a problem being comfortable in the third row. (Touring SP variant pictured) Children shouldn’t have a problem being comfortable in the third row. (Touring SP variant pictured)

It’s a little cramped in seats six and seven for my six-foot-tall frame, but there is decent legroom if the second-road seats scooch up a little.

Children shouldn’t have a problem being comfortable back there though, but charging points are only available on higher grades.

The boot of the CX-8 can swallow a decent amount of volume with all seats in place (290L), enough for a medium-sized suitcase and more than enough for some groceries or school bags.

  • With all seats in place, boot space is rated at 290L. (Touring SP variant pictured) With all seats in place, boot space is rated at 290L. (Touring SP variant pictured)
  • The boot floor can fold up to reveal more space. (Touring SP variant pictured) The boot floor can fold up to reveal more space. (Touring SP variant pictured)
  • Fold the third-row flat and cargo capacity grows to 775L. (Touring SP variant pictured) Fold the third-row flat and cargo capacity grows to 775L. (Touring SP variant pictured)

Fold the third-row flat and that expands to 775L, making it easier to haul a whole family's luggage for a holiday.

Tucked underneath the boot is also a space-saver spare wheel for a little peace of mind on long road trips.

Underneath the boot is a space-saver spare wheel. (Touring SP variant pictured) Underneath the boot is a space-saver spare wheel. (Touring SP variant pictured)

What are the key stats for the engine and transmission?   8/10

Our Touring SP petrol is powered by a 2.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine, which drives the front wheels via a six-speed automatic transmission.

The petrol engine outputs 140kW at 6000rpm and 252Nm at 4000rpm for a zero-to-100km/h run in a  lethargic 10.9 seconds.

The CX-8 is powered by either a 2.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine or a 2.2-litre turbocharged diesel. (Touring SP variant pictured) The CX-8 is powered by either a 2.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine or a 2.2-litre turbocharged diesel. (Touring SP variant pictured)

Opting for the diesel does liven things up a little, with the 2.2-litre turbocharged unit delivering 140kW/450Nm at 4500rpm and 2000rpm respectively.

And depending on configuration, FWD or AWD, the oil-burning CX-8 can reach triple-digit speeds in as little as 9.6s.

A third-row of seats is not light, of course, with our Touring SP grade tipping the scales at just under 1800kg, while the Asaki LE weighs in at a positively porky 1977kg.

How much fuel does it consume?   7/10

The CX-8 in front-drive petrol form will return an official fuel-consumption figure of 8.1 litres per 100km, while opting for a diesel  will lower that to 5.9L and 6.0L/100km for front and all-wheel-drive versions.

In my brief time with the Touring SP petrol, I averaged 9.4L/100km, mostly due to remaining in the inner-city and lugging around baby paraphernalia like a pram and car seat. Oh, and a baby.

The start-stop engine technology does help keep consumption down, but the near two-tonne kerb weight (1799-1978kg) doesn’t  help fuel economy.

What safety equipment is fitted? What safety rating?   9/10

The Mazda CX-8 was awarded a maximum five-star ANCAP safety rating from its test in mid-2018, with notably high scores for adult and child occupant protection.

As standard, the CX-8 is fitted with crucial safety systems that you would want in a family car, such as autonomous emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection, lane-keep assist, adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert with automatic braking, a reversing camera, traffic-sign recognition and rear parking sensors.

Stepping up to the Touring grade adds front parking sensors, while the Asaki nabs a surround-view monitor – both features that are nice to have, but not essential.

According to ANCAP, the CX-8’s AEB system is operational from 4-160km/h and is deemed ‘good’ for overall performance, while its lane-keep and lane-departure tech works from 60-180km/h and was given a ‘marginal’ grade.

Warranty & Safety Rating

Basic Warranty

5 years / unlimited km warranty

ANCAP Safety Rating

ANCAP logo

What does it cost to own? What warranty is offered?   8/10

Like all new Mazda’s sold in 2021, the CX-8 comes with a five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty, with roadside assist over that period.

Scheduled service intervals for the CX-8, regardless of petrol or diesel, are every 12 months or 10,000km, whichever occurs first.

Some rivals like the Hyundai Santa Fe need servicing every 12 months/15,000km, so those who like to rack up the mileage in a year need to take note.

The CX-8 is covered by Mazda's five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty. (Touring SP variant pictured) The CX-8 is covered by Mazda's five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty. (Touring SP variant pictured)

The cost of servicing over five years works out to be $2057 for the petrol engine and $2237 for the diesel, which averages out to about $411 and $447 per annum respectively.

Maintenance costs are a little on the expensive side for the CX-8 when compared to something like the Toyota Kluger, which asks $200 for every 12 month/10,000km service in the first five years.

What's it like to drive?   8/10

From the outside, you’d be forgiven for thinking the CX-8 is a CX-9, but behind the wheel there is no doubting its smaller dimensions and unique selling point.

With the CX-8 being as wide as a CX-5, it makes manoeuvring through the tight inner-city streets of Melbourne a breeze.

In our time with the car, we never turned down a tight laneway with cars parked on both sides and panicked about squeezing through with our mirrors intact.

This also helps with navigating streets shared with cyclists , with the CX-8 remaining comfortably in its lane at all times.

Our Touring SP grade was fitted with the 140kW/252Nm 2.5-litre petrol engine, which does an admirable job at moving the near-two-tonne car to city speeds, but struggled a little as the speedo climbed towards 100km/h.

This is especially evident in some freeway on-ramp situations that require you to get up to speed to merge, with the engine feeling out of breath – and even a bit coarse – towards the top-end of the rev range.

Luckily, peak torque is on tap from fairly low down, so when navigating the CX-8 to the supermarket or shopping centre, it is a delight to cruise from traffic light to traffic light.

We also sampled the diesel-powered Asaki LE recently, which offers up noticeably more pep thanks to its turbo-diesel engine's 140kW/450Nm – which matches the BT-50 workhorse’s 3.0-litre unit.

The diesel engine is no doubt a better option for those that take long road trips or frequent the freeway, and also stands the CX-8 even further apart from the turbo-petrol-only CX-9.

As with other models in its stable, Mazda has nailed the driving position and feel with the CX-8, with the driver’s seat offering heaps of all-round visibility, enough adjustability to get comfortable, and a steering wheel that serves up subtle cues as to what is happening on the road.

Don’t get us wrong, the CX-8 isn’t as engaging or sharp as an AMG SUV, but it’s certainly one of the better mainstream SUVs for fun and feel behind the wheel.

Verdict

Mazda’s updated CX-8 doesn’t really change much from the previous model, but it didn’t really need to fix what wasn’t broken.

The added Touring SP grade offers another choice for buyers who might be after some more upmarket features without the usual associated costs, while the Asaki LE’s captain’s chairs are genuinely a great feature.

The practical space and handsome looks are also big points in its favour, and even if the petrol engine can run out of huff towards the top end, the CX-8 remains a solid choice for those after a family hauler.

Pricing guides

$54,915
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)
Lowest Price
$39,910
Highest Price
$69,920

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
Asaki (awd) 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP AUTO $65,440 2021 Mazda CX-8 2021 Asaki (awd) Pricing and Specs
Asaki (awd) 100TH Anniversary 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP AUTO $66,940 2021 Mazda CX-8 2021 Asaki (awd) 100TH Anniversary Pricing and Specs
Asaki (fwd) 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP AUTO $61,440 2021 Mazda CX-8 2021 Asaki (fwd) Pricing and Specs
Asaki LE (awd) 2.2L, Diesel, 6 SP AUTO $69,290 2021 Mazda CX-8 2021 Asaki LE (awd) Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
8.3
Price and features9
Design8
Practicality9
Engine & trans8
Fuel consumption7
Safety9
Ownership8
Driving8
Tung Nguyen
News Editor

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