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Kia Niro
EXPERT RATING
7.7
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Kia Niro

Kia Niro Pricing and Specs

2021 price from
$39,990*

The Kia Niro is available from $39,990 to $65,990 for the 2021 SUV across a range of models.

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Year Price From Price To
2022 $39,990 $65,990
2021 $39,990 $65,990

Kia Niro FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Kia here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • What Does GUV Stand for?

    What does GUV stand for? Glad you asked. GUV is a relatively new term on the motoring landscape and, in bald terms, stands for Grand Utility Vehicle. The broad view is that it was an acronym first coined by Kia to describe its current-model Carnival on the basis that it was a step up in luxury from the average SUV and, therefore, needed a grander name; literally, Grand Utility Vehicle.

    Like a lot of marketing, of course, the name is more or less meaningless when it comes to being an actual descriptor for the vehicle in question. Yes, the Carnival is well equipped and luxurious for a family vehicle, but 'Grand'? Grammatically, there’s also scope to interpret the vehicle as having a grand level of utility which, given its eight-seat capacity and family friendliness it arguably achieves. Beyond that, however, the definition is rooted purely in the imaginations of the marketing department. Searching for more GUV meaning than that is unlikely to expand the sum of human knowledge.

    But now that Kia has slipped the genie from the bottle, you can expect to see the GUV tag applied to all sorts of vehicles formerly known as SUVs, both large and small, and both in Australia and globally. It’s also likely that the vehicles to adopt the GUV tag will be high-end versions of more prosaic SUVs, and there’s a good chance that the prestige brands might introduce the term to their brochures as well.

    That said, GUV could also disappear without a trace. The same thing happened to Toyota’s AUV (Action Utility Vehicle) tag a few years ago which was applied to variants of the HiLux range. But the AUV moniker has since been reclaimed by the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle industry which builds unmanned submarines to explore the undersea environment.

    There’s another reason GUV could disappear from car advertising and marketing: In the US, rising fuel prices have forced older, gas-guzzling SUVs into the driveways of a poorer demographic who can’t afford anything more efficient. At which point, as Urban Dictionary points out, the term GUV was coined to describe the 'Ghetto Utility Vehicle'.

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  • Does the Kia Sportage have Apple CarPlay & Android Auto?

    The brand-new Kia SUV for Australia (due for release in October 2021) has finally brought Kia Sportage Apple CarPlay and Android connectivity to all models across the range. Previously, the base-model missed out on these fitments, but the all-new platform extends these features to every model.

    All Sportages will now also get digital radio and multi-device connectivity. The base-model S variant gets an eight-inch touchscreen, while the SX and SX+ models have a 12.3-inch screen. The range-topping GT-Line model will get a curved 12.3-inch screen.

    It’s really not viable to retro-fit the new Sportage’s system into an older car, and most owners have found that a more cost effective upgrade to a new aftermarket head unit will offer the features they want, including the ability to enjoy Apple CarPlay and Android Auto Kia Sportage style.

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  • Why does my 2009 Kia Sorento Intermittently go into limp home mode?

    Before you do anything, take the car to a workshop with the correct diagnostic gear and have it scanned. This process will see the workshop’s computer have a deep and meaningful conversation with the computer in your car, and the result will probably be a fault code(s) that will tell the mechanic exactly what’s going wrong.

    Beyond that, you’re merely stabbing in the dark, as limp-home mode can be triggered for all sorts of reasons including dud sensors, poor wiring, a computer glitch, you name it. The fact that it’s an intermittent limp-home situation makes it even harder to diagnose without a computer scan. You cans start to replace components at random to see if they fix the problem, but you’ll probably wind up replacing a whole heap of perfectly working ones before you stumble on to the one that’s playing up. In the meantime, you’ll have spent heaps and wasted weeks.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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