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Volkswagen Amarok 2023 review


Daily driver score

4/5

Tradies score

4/5

If there's one launch that approaches the anticipation of last year's Ford Ranger, then its new fraternal twin, the Volkswagen Amarok II, must be it.

There are so many questions needing answering. Is it more than just a badge-engineered Blue Oval ute? Does it drive as well? And how does it stack up value-for-money wise?

To find out, here's our first taste of the NF-series Amarok – at least, the more expensive ones. Base Core and low-series Life come on stream a little later on.

Let's dive straight in.

Price and features – Does it represent good value for the price? What features does it come with?

VW has long been the aspirational people's car, and the Amarok is no exception amongst dual-cab utes. And aspiration usually comes at a premium that people are usually prepared to pay.

Predictably, prices have risen over the previous model, but then so have equipment levels.

Built at a Ford plant in South Africa instead of in Argentina or Germany, as per the previous generation version (or Thailand as per Ranger for Australia for that matter), today's least-expensive Amarok essentially starts from $52,990 (all prices are before on-road costs) for the Core 4x4 with six-speed auto, powered by a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel dubbed TDI405.

  • The headlights have a highlight ridge above them which now denotes VW commercial vehicle design.. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The headlights have a highlight ridge above them which now denotes VW commercial vehicle design.. (PanAmericana variant pictured)
  • The C-shaped tail-lights emphasise width. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The C-shaped tail-lights emphasise width. (PanAmericana variant pictured)
  • The Amarok is 5350mm long. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The Amarok is 5350mm long. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

Yep, all models are four-wheel drive for now.

If you're quick, you can save $2000 and nab a manual version, but VW has already decided to drop that for Australia due to insufficient demand.

The Core might be the workhorse version with vinyl floors, but you receive a decent wedge of equipment, starting with some safety essentials that the old Amarok couldn't offer – including 20 fresh driver-assist systems that finally brings in Autonomous Emergency Braking, as well as nine airbags. These and other elements are outlined below in the Safety section.

  • The goal here was to make Amarok a little bit more contemporary, rugged and masculine. (Aventura variant pictured) The goal here was to make Amarok a little bit more contemporary, rugged and masculine. (Aventura variant pictured)
  • Much of the design took place in Melbourne during the Ford Ranger T6.2’s gestation in 2019/20. (Aventura variant pictured) Much of the design took place in Melbourne during the Ford Ranger T6.2’s gestation in 2019/20. (Aventura variant pictured)
  • The 2.3L petrol Amarok is a tad disappointing. (Adventura variant pictured) The 2.3L petrol Amarok is a tad disappointing. (Adventura variant pictured)

Core also upstages base Ranger XL 4x4 dual cab auto equivalent (from $50,180) in eschewing halogens for LED headlights and (albeit handsome) steelies for alloys, as well as having DAB+ digital radio and a rear centre armrest with cupholders.

Additionally, the base VW includes adaptive cruise control (but without stop-and-go in Core), fabric-covered seats, single-zone air-conditioning, digitalised instrumentation, a 10.1-inch portrait touchscreen with voice-command (basically Ford's SYNC4 multimedia system), a reversing camera, front and rear parking sensors, wireless charging, wireless app connect for Apple CarPlay/Android Auto and Bluetooth connectivity.

There's also remote central locking, power windows, rain-sensing wipers, auto on/off headlights, side steps, a factory-fitted towbar, electric folding mirrors, tailgate with lift-assist (but not drop), roof rails, a 12V outlet in the tub and 17-inch alloys.

  • The Amarok is a good-looking ute. (Style variant pictured) The Amarok is a good-looking ute. (Style variant pictured)
  • The roof, body frame and glass areas are shared with the Ranger. (Style variant pictured) The roof, body frame and glass areas are shared with the Ranger. (Style variant pictured)
  • VW’s designers have managed to perform a masterful job disguising the Ranger. (Style variant pictured) VW’s designers have managed to perform a masterful job disguising the Ranger. (Style variant pictured)

Next up is the Life, from $56,990, that switches from a single-turbo diesel to a more-powerful (BiTurbo) twin-turbo diesel with 10 instead of six speeds for the auto.

It also boasts fog lights, auto-lock tailgate, more body-coloured trim, carpet, extra seat adjustability, rear privacy glass, improved driver-assist safety, rear disc brakes instead of drums, an electronic park brake and auto shifter, adaptive cruise with stop-and-go, and more.

Meanwhile, the anticipated best-selling Amarok – the Style from $66,990 – adds 18-inch alloys, matrix LED headlights, keyless entry/start, upgraded instrumentation and audio, an insulated windscreen, dual-zone climate control with rear seat air vents, ambient lighting, a stitched leather-like dashboard cover, powered/heated front seats, a 12-inch touchscreen, a 360-degree area-view camera, a rear sports bar, cargo bed liner, alarm, park assist and more.

Inside is a 10.1-inch portrait touchscreen. (Adventura variant pictured) Inside is a 10.1-inch portrait touchscreen. (Adventura variant pictured)

This is also the cheapest Amarok with the 3.0L V6 turbo-diesel option, costing another $4000 on top. Branded TDI600, this larger engine also drives the $75,990 PanAmericana.

The PanAmericana is the more rugged off-road-biased Amarok in the Ranger Wildtrak mould, ushering in unique front bumper treatments, upgraded leather, premium audio, darkened cabin highlights and other luxuries.

There's also a 'dynamic suspension package' from this grade up, with a monotube damper set-up for better body control at speed, in lieu of the twin-tube dampers fitted to lesser variants.

The Adventura wears 21-inch alloy wheels. (Aventura variant pictured) The Adventura wears 21-inch alloy wheels. (Aventura variant pictured)

Uniquely in this size of pick-up, if diesel's not your thing, then try the range-topping Aventura petrol. Known as the TSI452 and kicking off from $79,990, it boasts a variation of the Ford Mustang EcoBoost's four-cylinder turbo engine as an alternative to the same-priced TDI600 V6 diesel version. Even Ford doesn't sell a Pony Car-powered ute!

Among other goodies, it adds 21-inch wheels (with those monotube dampers), even plusher leather, lashings of extra chrome and a moulded sail plane with powered tub cover.

For now, there are a few items the Amarok lacks that the Ranger includes – like the overhead auxiliary switchboard for future accessories, a side tub step for easier access, soft-open tailgate, surround-vehicle 'zone' lighting, outboard dash cupholders on upper grades, and 4WD-ing data from Wildtrak up.

The Amarok’s growth spurt results in a roomier interior. (Style variant pictured) The Amarok’s growth spurt results in a roomier interior. (Style variant pictured)

Bad news for those with FOMO. But none are really deal-breakers, as the basic functionality of both utes is essentially the same.

So, what do we think? Compared to other rivals, the latest Amarok's generally more-expensive pricing and premium must be weighed against its Australian engineering (like Ranger), as well as on-brand design and presentation inside and out – something VW does very well.

If the latter is worth anything to you – as the most upmarket medium-sized truck you can currently buy in Australia – then VW's ute must represent strong value for money.

Design – Is there anything interesting about its design?

The Amarok is a good-looking ute in anybody's language – certainly, from Style-grade up as experienced.

VW's designers have also managed to perform a masterful job disguising the Ranger. The roof, body frame and glass areas are the only obvious exterior parts shared. All other panels are unique, apparently.

According to VW's figures, compared to the 2010 Amarok, the NF series brandishes more length (5350mm versus 5254mm), width (1910mm versus 1834m), height (1886mm versus 1834mm) and wheelbase (3270mm versus 3097mm).

The interior is quiet and hushed. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The interior is quiet and hushed. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

Front and rear tracks, at 1629mm and 1650mm, are 19mm narrower and 6.0mm wider respectively.

Fyi, 4x4 fans, ground clearance is 235mm, wading depth is 800mm, and approach/ramp/departure angles are 30/22/26.6 degrees respectively.

With that stretched wheelbase and both axles pushed out, the proportions have also changed, to what VW calls an 'SUV' ute look.

The goal here was to make Amarok a little bit more contemporary, rugged and masculine, without being aggressive and too truck-like. Much of the design took place in Melbourne during the Ford Ranger T6.2's gestation in 2019/20.

The PanAmericana features all-terrain 18-inch wheel/tyre package. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The PanAmericana features all-terrain 18-inch wheel/tyre package. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

The headlights have a highlight ridge above them which now denotes VW commercial vehicle design. The fluted bonnet's ridges are so to provide an extra bit of vision of the road ahead. And the grille is framed with what the company calls its signature 'closed volumes'.

Other details include squared-out wheel arches that recall the original Amarok, C-shaped tail-lights that emphasise width as well as differentiation, and 'AMAROK' embossed in the tailgate.

Overall, the styling is a success because it manages to be pretty and not look like a Ford.

Practicality – How practical is its space and tech inside?

The Amarok's growth spurt results in a roomier interior, as well as a better one.

Entry and egress is simple – aided by large doors, side steps as standard, and pillar-sited pull handles.

There's more space than before in every direction, backed up by commanding views out, a brilliant driving position and easy reach of everything.

There's a sneaky phone pocket on the back of the front seats. (Adventura variant pictured) There's a sneaky phone pocket on the back of the front seats. (Adventura variant pictured)

While many of the switches and controls are clearly Ranger-based – including the controversial 'E-Shifter' transmission lever and 'SYNC4' multimedia system – there are Amarok-specific items that need to be called out.

Given how hit-and-miss most of VW's latest dashboards have been, this one manages to meld old-school elegance with modern-day touchscreen functionality even better than the Ford.

It looks great, works fine and is in keeping with the upmarket ambience the Germans are striving for.

In front of the gear shifter is a wireless charging pad. (Adventura variant pictured) In front of the gear shifter is a wireless charging pad. (Adventura variant pictured)

Then there are the unique front seats, which are snug yet supportive in these mid-grade levels at least, providing hours of comfort. They're top notch.

Likewise, once you figure out how to access it, the climate control system seems terrifically suited for Australian conditions.

Storage is ample, with two glove boxes in these up-spec models, while there's space to stretch out back compared to the old model.

There's a pair of rear-seat outboard ISOFIX latches for baby seats. (PanAmericana variant pictured) There's a pair of rear-seat outboard ISOFIX latches for baby seats. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

From a packaging and practicality point of view, the Amarok scores strongly. Plus, in the up-spec grades we drove on the launch, interior ambience and quality are first class.

The instrumentation evokes the Golf, and offers a range of differentiation. The lower-screen toggle switches look classy and work a treat. And the interior is quiet and hushed – like you're wearing earmuffs. VW has succeeded in making this ute feel refined and sophisticated.

So much for the pros. Cons include the fiddly multimedia screen, especially when it comes to accessing the climate control system.

Tray length is 1544mm, 1224mm wide and 529mm deep. (Style variant pictured) Tray length is 1544mm, 1224mm wide and 529mm deep. (Style variant pictured)

There are too many steps drilling into the menu. Why not have physical buttons for all these functions? Adjustment requires taking eyes off the road and breaking driver concentration.

A set of paddle shifters would be appreciated, instead of the annoying (ex-Ford) E-shifter and its counter-intuitive rocker switch. Or, please VW, just give us a Tiptronic shifter.

And, as mentioned earlier, unlike the Ranger, there are no dash-end pull-out cupholders in higher spec models, or auxiliary switch blanks for accessories.

The Adventura has a powered tub cover. (Adventura variant pictured) The Adventura has a powered tub cover. (Adventura variant pictured)

But overall, this interior has an elegance and a harmony that is second to none.

Using your premium dual cab ute as a workhorse?

Braked towing capacity continues to be rated at 3500kg, tub volume rises slightly, GVM and payload are up, there's more ground clearance, overhangs are shorter front and rear, there are six cargo lashing rings rated at 400kg each, the tailgate has lift-assist closing (but not opening like Ranger) and you can still fit a Euro pallet between the wheel arches.

The Amarok has a premium interior. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The Amarok has a premium interior. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

The Amarok also gains two front tow hooks and a static roof load rating of 350kg. But the side-tub step the Ranger has is a good idea that shorter folk will miss.

These are for the dual-cab pick-up bodystyle, as VW won't be importing any other configuration like a cab chassis into Australia for now.

Under the bonnet – What are the key stats for its engine and transmission?

Ford-derived engines and transmissions abound, but the VW does have a couple of aces up its sleeve.

For starters, you're not limited to just diesel. And if you're quick, there's even a manual gearbox on offer.

That's for the Core only, a base model that uses a 2.0-litre single-turbo-diesel, in either six-speed manual or six-speed torque-converter auto choices.

Power is rated at 125kW at 3500rpm. This engine is known as the TDI405 – the number equating to 405Nm of torque (maxing out between 1750-2500rpm).

Next up is the 2.0-litre twin-turbo version dubbed TDI500, making 154kW at 3750rpm and 500Nm between 1750-2000rpm. It is offered solely with a 10-speed torque-converter auto. This powers the Life and Style.

The 2.3-litre turbo-petrol engine produces 222kW/452Nm. (Aventura variant pictured) The 2.3-litre turbo-petrol engine produces 222kW/452Nm. (Aventura variant pictured)

The Amarok Style also introduces the 3.0-litre V6 turbo-diesel that VW calls the TDI600 – for 184kW at 3250rpm and 600Nm between 1750-2250rpm. Also powering the PanAmericana and Aventura, it too is paired to a 10-speed auto.

It also ushers in '4Motion' permanent 4WD, rather than the 2.0L diesels' selectable part-time 4WD that just offer 4x2 2WD, 4x4 Low range and 4x4 High range choices.

Instead, 4Motion permanent 4WD varies drive to the front or rear wheels as needed, and features six driving modes: 'Normal', 'Eco', 'Tow/Haul' and 'Slippery' for on-road driving, and 'Mud/Rut' and 'Snow/Sand' for use off-road.

Each alter engine throttle, transmission, braking, traction and stability controls as required.

Being all 4x4, every model includes a mechanical differential lock.

Ride comfort is noteworthy for most models. (PanAmericana variant pictured) Ride comfort is noteworthy for most models. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

Finally, there's the Amarok-exclusive 2.3-litre four-cylinder turbo-petrol engine known as TSI452 – because it delivers 222kW at 5900rpm and 452Nm at 3350rpm.

Another 10-speed auto proposition with 4Motion permanent 4WD, it is rare to offer petrol power amongst medium-sized dual-cab utes.

And speaking of rare, remember. You need to act fast if you fancy a base Amarok manual because its days are numbered.

Steering is an electric rack and pinion set-up; front suspension is an independent wishbone coil-sprung arrangement while the rear end has leaf springs.

Efficiency – What is its fuel consumption? What is its driving range?

The Amarok petrol will tax your wallet more than the torquey diesels when it comes to refuelling.

The petrol's official combined fuel consumption figure is 9.9 litres per 100km, compared to 8.4 for the V6 diesel, 7.4L for the 2.0L BiTurbo diesel, 7.2L for the 2.0L single turbo diesel auto and 7.1L for the latter's diesel manual version.

Fitted with an 80-litre tank, this equates to an average range distance of about 805km (petrol), 950km (V6 diesel), 1000km (BiTurbo diesel) and 1110km (single-turbo diesel).

If economy's your priority, stick with diesel. Note, too, that the petrol needs 95 RON premium unleaded.

Interestingly, using the Amarok's trip computer readout on the city-to-country leg of the local launch program, the petrol returned 11.6, just ahead of the 2.0L BiTurbo's 11.4L, while the laidback V6 beat them both, with just 9.5L/100km.

Driving – What's it like to drive?

Now for the moment of truth. How does the Amarok drive on (and off) Australian public roads?

Let's begin by reiterating how smooth and car-like the previous-generation was. It set the standard for all other medium-sized utes to follow, and served as a dynamic, as well as refinement benchmark for both its Ranger and second-gen successors. A game-changer.

The happy news is that the Amarok is at least as easy and as effortless to drive as it was before. So, even though it is larger and more rugged, it never seems like a truck – unless you're manoeuvring at low speeds in 4L low-range, like all 4x4 utes do.

VW says the combination of good ground clearance, shorter overhangs and a tough chassis with advanced 4WD mechanicals make this a capable off-roader. (PanAmericana variant pictured) VW says the combination of good ground clearance, shorter overhangs and a tough chassis with advanced 4WD mechanicals make this a capable off-roader. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

The steering is light yet responsive, especially around town, and so is a cinch to park – and all that's aided by the multitude of cameras and sensors fitted to most grades. That classic shrinking-around-you feeling is at play here.

Similarly, at speed, there is a sense of confidence and control you don't get in any other truck besides the Ranger.

The Amarok goes exactly where it's pointed, for assured handling, the tyres do a great job gripping the road (and we drove in pouring rain at times) and the brakes have a determined yet progressive feel.

A brief but challenging 4x4 track highlighted the PanAmericana’s off-road abilities. (PanAmericana variant pictured) A brief but challenging 4x4 track highlighted the PanAmericana’s off-road abilities. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

Dynamically this VW is absolutely sound, and right up there with the Ranger in most regards.

In most regards? Some keener drivers may wish for more steering weight and road feedback. For the majority, the Amarok's dynamic balance of competent ease and isolation is just right, especially as real agility is not compromised.

And it's certainly way better than almost every alternative ute. But others – including us – should find the Ranger's sportier and more involving handling preferable. A back-to-back comparison will reveal all. Watch out for that soon.

Ride comfort is noteworthy for most models. (Adventura variant pictured) Ride comfort is noteworthy for most models. (Adventura variant pictured)

On the engine front, we've driven the 2.0L BiTurbo diesel in the Style, and it's certainly strong enough, with fast throttle response and punchy acceleration across the board. And there's enough in reserve for nimble overtaking.

It's quite muted for a powerful diesel. Plus, despite having 10 gears, the auto works away so quietly and efficiently in the background, you're rarely even aware it's there.

But that pales in comparison with the V6 diesel, which is altogether gutsier. It's stronger, it sounds louder but way better, and likewise the 10-speed auto just does its stuff shuffling through each ratio unobtrusively.

The steering is light yet responsive. (Style variant pictured) The steering is light yet responsive. (Style variant pictured)

It's more on brand with what VW is trying to achieve with a premium pick-up truck. Mile-munching muscle. You could call this the first GT ute since the demise of Aussie car-based coupe utes.

However, the 2.3L petrol Amarok is a tad disappointing.

Yes, being a Mustang-sourced unit, it's impressively brawny; in fact, this four-pot turbo is apparently the most powerful truck you can buy with a 3.5-tonne towing capacity.

Dynamically this VW is absolutely sound. (PanAmericana variant pictured) Dynamically this VW is absolutely sound. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

And so, there's no lack of oomph. Or speed. It's point-and-shoot rapid. But with peak power topping out at a heady 5900rpm, the engine has to work hard.

And when it does, it sounds gruff, to the obvious detriment of smoothness and refinement. During my first drive leg, I was constantly checking the tacho initially to confirm I wasn't accidentally driving the BiTurbo diesel.

Plus, the 10-speed auto has to work much harder, constantly downshifting to the point where it does become obvious. Behaviour that's opposite to the V6 experience.

The Amarok never feels like a truck. (Style variant pictured) The Amarok never feels like a truck. (Style variant pictured)

The choice then would be the V6 turbo-diesel. It suits the Amarok character as well as its maker's aspirations. Just as in the old version.

Suspension-wise, ride comfort is noteworthy for most models. On test, with the 18-inch tyre packages, regardless of whether it was the road-focused Style or more off-road-biased PanAmericana, the VW rides laudably, with pitching and body movement well contained.

Shod as such, the Amarok provides comfortable isolation from the outside world. The Core/Life grades' 17-inch wheels should be even better. Credit for expert tuning here.

The Amarok offers six different driving modes. (PanAmericana variant pictured) The Amarok offers six different driving modes. (PanAmericana variant pictured)

But in the top-line 21-inch shod Aventura, the ride is not so pleasing, deteriorating to the point of being a little bit abrupt in our conditions.

Despite trick dampers doing a heroic job keeping things calm, the suspension is ultimately too firm, except on the smoothest roads, and you're aware there's a lot of rumbling along coarser bitumen.

Which is a shame, given how great the alloys look and how well they fill the Amarok's wheel arches. Classic form over function compromise here.

The Amarok goes exactly where it’s pointed. (Adventura variant pictured) The Amarok goes exactly where it’s pointed. (Adventura variant pictured)

VW says the combination of good ground clearance, shorter overhangs and a tough chassis with advanced 4WD mechanicals come together to make this a capable off-roader.

A brief but at-times challenging 4x4 track highlighted the PanAmericana's honed abilities.

In fact, overall, the Amarok's broad talents on and off bitumen reflect how well-suited it is for Australia.

Quiet, refined and quite laid back, yet with the ability to flex its muscles when required, we have come away largely impressed with the way this VW behaves and drives.

Like the Ranger, but different.

Safety – What safety equipment is fitted? What is its safety rating?

The Amarok scores a maximum five-star ANCAP crash-test rating.

Compared to the previous model, VW says there are in excess of 30 new safety and driver assist systems in the NF. These are all in line with the Ranger.

The biggest is the inclusion of AEB with forward collision warning for the first time in the series, bringing pedestrian, cyclist and back-over monitoring.

Then, depending on grade, there's lane keeping, lane departure, swerve-steer assist, traffic sign recognition with speed control (not Core/Life), multi-collision braking, adaptive cruise control (ACC), ACC with stop-go functionality (not Core), a speed limiter and rear-cross traffic alert with manoeuvre braking (not Core).

Also included are blind-spot monitor with trailer/caravan coverage (not Core), driver fatigue warning, adaptive load control, roll-over mitigation, automatic emergency call-out should the driver become incapacitated following airbag deployment, an area-view 360-degree camera (not Core/Life), park-assist with front/rear parking sensors (not Core/Life), hill-start assist, hill-descent control and tyre-pressure monitors.

The the interior is quiet and hushed. (Adventura variant pictured) The the interior is quiet and hushed. (Adventura variant pictured)

The AEB car-to-car range is between 4.0km/h and 180km/h; for 'Front Assist' functionality that monitors pedestrians, cyclists and back-over manoeuvres it functions between a 5.0-80km/h range, while the lane-support systems operate between 60-180km/h.

Nine airbags are fitted to all models – dual frontal, side chest, side head, driver and passenger knee and front-centre. The latter helps prevent lateral head/body impact between the front-seat occupants.

The Amarok's bonnet design also helps it achieve a good vulnerable road user protection score.

Anti-lock brakes with electronic brake-force distribution, brake assist, electronic stability control and traction controls are, of course, also included across the range.

A pair of rear-seat outboard ISOFIX latches as well as strap anchor points are fitted to attach/secure child seats to.

Note, however, that the Amarok misses out on the integrated side-tub step fitted to some Rangers. This is meant to stop users using the tyre as a step, which can be extremely slippery and risky.

Ownership – What warranty is offered? What are its service intervals? What are its running costs?

The Amarok offers a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, as well as one year of free roadside assistance, which is average for its class.

Where the VW stands out is in its affordable basic scheduled service pricing that even undercuts the Ranger's, as well as the best-selling HiLux.

According to VW, buyers have a choice of five individual services as per the Amarok's 12-month/15,000km intervals, with prices set at $329 each for the first two, $414 for the third, $329 for the fourth and $400 for the fifth.

These prices apply to all versions of the Amarok.

Alternatively, VW is also offering a '5 Year Care Plan', that takes in an upfront payment of $1800 for the first five basic services.

While this represents a saving of just one dollar as the total cost of paying for separate services is $1801 under the scheme, it presumably safeguards against future price rises over the five services as the total amount would already have been paid in advance.

The original Amarok changed the ute.

Even a decade on from its 2010 launch, it remained one of the most civilised and car-like to sit inside and drive. Dated looks and a lack of sufficient safety were its few stumbling blocks.

In fact, you can thank the VW for some of the best things about the latest Ranger, including its V6 engine fitment, available permanent 4WD system, larger Euro palette-sized tub capacity and general step-up in sophistication.

Where the Amarok shines brightest is in its convincingly upmarket appeal, boasting a properly premium interior style and execution, quieter operation and refined comfort. All are very on-brand qualities that mostly build on the excellent Ranger's all-round capabilities. The Style V6 best combines these many disparate strengths.

But you must pay for all that extra premium-ness, there are a few innovations and features the Ranger seems to have kept to itself, while for steering and handling, it doesn't feel as sporty or connected as the Ford.

It all comes down to taste and priorities – the rugged athleticism of the cheaper Ranger versus the suave polish of the posher Amarok. The VW is pretty much as good as utes get in this class.

Note: CarsGuide attended this event as a guest of the manufacturer, with accommodation and meals provided.

$45,888 - $98,990

Based on 790 car listings in the last 6 months

VIEW PRICING & SPECS

Daily driver score

4/5

Tradies score

4/5
Price Guide

$45,888 - $98,990

Based on 790 car listings in the last 6 months

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Disclaimer: The pricing information shown in the editorial content (Review Prices) is to be used as a guide only and is based on information provided to Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd (Carsguide) both by third party sources and the car manufacturer at the time of publication. The Review Prices were correct at the time of publication.  Carsguide does not warrant or represent that the information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon this information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.