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Mercedes-Benz Australia has announced sweeping price changes for its C-Class Sedan and Estate ranges, with increases of $500 to $1596 before on-road costs affecting all variants as of this month.

Specifically, the C200 and C250d models have risen by $500, while the C350e petrol-electric hybrid has copped a $600 hike. All Estates continue to cost $2500 more than their Sedan equivalents.

However, AMG variants are impacted the most, with C43 having increased by $711 and $712 for its Sedan and Estate versions respectively, while the biggest change is reserved for the flagship C63 S that jumps by $1596.

Mercedes-Benz sits comfortably at the top of the local premium mid-size segment.
Mercedes-Benz sits comfortably at the top of the local premium mid-size segment.

Additionally, the C250 and C200d models have now been superseded by C300 and C220d respectively for both body styles, with their replacements costing $500 more.

Along with the change in monikers comes upgraded engines for both variants, with C300 uprating outputs from its predecessor's 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder petrol powerplant to 180kW/370Nm – an increase of 25kW/20Nm.

Meanwhile, C220d welcomes a more significant change, as the 100kW/320Nm 1.6-litre turbo-diesel four-potter from the outgoing C200d has been discontinued along with its seven-speed automatic transmission.

Instead, a 2.1-litre unit that produces 125kW/400Nm sits underneath the bonnet of C220d, while power is sent to the rear wheels via a nine-speed auto.

There are no changes to the powertrains or specification levels of any other model.

Furthermore, buyers of four-cylinder variants – excluding C350e – will be offered the no-cost option of an 'Exclusive Line' package, which the German carmaker says has been popular among E-Class customers.

Buyers of four-cylinder variants – excluding C350e – will be offered the no-cost option of an 'Exclusive Line' package.
Buyers of four-cylinder variants – excluding C350e – will be offered the no-cost option of an 'Exclusive Line' package.

If optioned, 18-inch twin-spoke alloy wheels, adaptive dampers, 'Artico' man-made leather-stitched dashboard and beltlines, brown ash open-pore wood/silver chrome trim and a Mercedes-Benz bonnet star are added.

As well, 'Artico' man-made leather upholstery and an adaptive closing function for the radiator grille are included for C200 and C220d, while C300 and C250d upgrade to genuine leather upholstery.

Mercedes-Benz sits comfortably at the top of the local premium mid-size segment, with 3449 examples of the C-Class sold to the end of May this year.

This figures sees it edge out the BMW 3 Series (1120), Audi A4 (972), Lexus IS (715), Jaguar XE (419), Alfa Romeo Giulia (209) and Infiniti Q50 (78) during the same period.

What makes the Mercedes-Benz C-Class such a sales success? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

Justin Hilliard
Head of Editorial
Justin’s dad chose to miss his birth because he wanted to watch Peter Brock hopefully win Bathurst, so it figures Justin grew up to have a car obsession, too – and don’t worry, his dad did turn up in time after some stern words from his mum. That said, despite loving cars and writing, Justin chose to pursue career paths that didn’t lend themselves to automotive journalism, before eventually ending up working as a computer technician. But that car itch just couldn’t be scratched by his chipped Volkswagen Golf R (Mk7), so he finally decided to give into the inevitable and study a Master of Journalism at the same time. And even with the long odds, Justin was lucky enough to land a full-time job as a motoring journalist soon after graduating and the rest, as they say, is history. These days, Justin happily finds himself working at CarsGuide during the biggest period of change yet for the automotive industry, which is perhaps the most exciting part of all. In case you’re wondering, Justin begrudgingly sold the Golf R (sans chip) and still has plans to buy his dream car, an E46 BMW M3 coupe (manual, of course), but he is in desperate need of a second car space – or maybe a third.
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