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Hyundai Tucson 2021

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Hyundai Tucson 2021

Our most recent review of the 2021 Hyundai Tucson resulted in a score of 7 out of 10 for that particular example.

Carsguide Vani Naidoo had this to say at the time: The Tucson continues to be a great performer for Hyundai in a crowded SUV segment and after a week back in the driving seat it is not hard to see why. Families need uncomplicated, things that do what they say on the box in way that causes absolutely no fuss. And the Tucson definitely ticks that box. It is spacious and comfortable with good on-road manners, a great safety package and peace-of-mind warranty.

You can read the full review here.

This is what Vani Naidoo liked most about this particular version of the Hyundai Tucson: Spacious interior, Safety package, Family-friendly inclusions

Hyundai Tucson 2021 Price and Specs

Pricing guides

$39,688
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)
Lowest Price
$29,640
Highest Price
$49,735
Hyundai Tucson Model Body Type Specs Price
Active (2WD) SUV 2.0L ULP 6 SP AUTO $32,140
Active (2WD) SUV 2.0L ULP 6 SP MAN $29,640
Active (awd) SUV 2.0L Diesel 8 SP AUTO $37,440
Active X (2WD) SUV 2.0L ULP 6 SP AUTO $35,090
See All Hyundai Tucson 2021 Pricing and Specs

Hyundai Tucson 2021 Q&As

Check out real-world situations relating to the Hyundai Tucson here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Which small SUV should I buy to replace my Hyundai Tucson?

    Boy, the world is your oyster, Elizabeth. There are literally dozens of options when it comes to a compact SUV. If you’re otherwise happy with the Hyundai, then maybe look at the Hyundai Kona. It’s available as a turbo all-wheel-drive or as a non-turbo front-drive car (not to mention the Kona Electric, an all-electric version) and will come with Hyundai’s great factory warranty and reliability that you’ve already experienced with the Tucson. The other option would the equivalent from Hyundai’s sister company, Kia. The Kia Sportage an also be had as a turbo-diesel, although for normal suburban driving, a petrol is probably your best bet.

    Then, you have all the various offerings from the Japanese makers as well as left-field entrants from MG, Fiat, Mini and more. But you need to be careful, because there isn’t always a whole lot of difference between the width of a compact SUV and a mid-sizer. Sure, there’s generally more space inside the bigger car, but it’s often the result of extra length and height rather than width. For instance, your Tucson (assuming it’s the current model) has a width of 1850mm while the Kona is just 50mm (about two inches) narrower. That may not be enough of a difference and you may need to go down two sizes to, say, a Hyundai Venue which is smaller and narrower again with a width of 1770mm.

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  • Should the the timing seal/crankshaft seal of my new 2019 Hyundai Tucson need replacing at the first service?

    I don’t think you have anything to worry about, Yash. Oil seals often weep a bit of oil and it’s good to see that the dealership has noticed it and wants to change the seal, rather than ignore it and make it your problem once the car is out of warranty. Speaking of warranty, your car came with six years of factory cover, so even if the seal leaks again in that time, it won’t cost you anything to have it fixed.

    As for your other concerns; an oil seal is not a big problem and won’t cause any other damage (unless the oil is pouring out and leaving the engine without sufficient oil (which it isn’t in your case). Changing the seal will have no effect on the rest of the car, the problem will probably never occur again (not in the 10 years you plan to own it, anyway), the seal can be changed simply without opening the engine, and the cause is probably something as simple as a seal with a small manufacturing defect or one that was accidentally `pinched’ during assembly at the Hyundai factory.

    Modern cars are incredibly complex machines consisting of thousands of parts. Even the best models from the best makes can have small defects like this one. Don’t sweat it.

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  • What trim level is my 2019 Hyundai Tucson?

    While the vehicle’s VIN will identify the make and model, it won’t necessarily spell out the trim level. That information is usually incorporated on to a build plate attached to the firewall or inner fender.

    From June 2019, Hyundai changed the name of its entry-level `Go’ model to `Active’ so effectively, you’ve bought the base-model car anyway. If you have been sold anything other than an Active model, you’ve received a higher specification model, so I wouldn’t be complaining back at the dealership.

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  • Hyundai Tucson 2015: Problems with multimedia screen

    This has cropped up before in relatively new Hyundais and seems to be a software – rather than a hardware – problem. The solution is to take the car to a Hyundai dealer who will be able to reload the unit’s software and all should be well.

    I’ve also heard of the odd case where the entire head unit was replaced by Hyundai, but reloading the software (which should take only a few minutes) seems to be the most common fix.

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See All Hyundai Tucson Q&As
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.