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2021 Ford Ranger
EXPERT RATING
7.5
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Ford Ranger

2021 Ford Ranger Pricing and Specs

From
$29,190*

The Ford Ranger 2021 prices range from $29,190 for the basic trim level Ute Ranger XL 2.2 LOW Rider (4X2) to $77,190 for the top of the range Ute Ranger Raptor 2.0 (4X4).

The Ford Ranger 2021 is available in Diesel. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the Ute 2.2L 6 SP Manual to the Ute 2.0L 10 SP Automatic.

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Ute

Ford Ranger Models SPECS PRICE
FX4 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $65,940
Raptor 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $77,190
Sport 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $55,740
Sport 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $53,540
Wildtrak 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $65,790
Wildtrak 3.2 (4x4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $64,290
Wildtrak 3.2 (4x4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $62,090
Wildtrak X (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $66,290
Wildtrak X (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $64,090
Wildtrak X 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $67,990
XL 2.2 (4X4) 2.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $47,290
XL 2.2 (4X4) 2.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $48,690
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2) 2.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $34,890
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2) 2.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $39,390
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2) 2.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $40,790
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2) 2.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $37,390
XL 2.2 LOW Rider (4X2) 2.2LDiesel6 speed manual $29,190
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $45,290
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $47,790
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $49,190
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $52,490
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $49,790
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $43,090
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $45,590
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $48,990
XL 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $47,590
XL 3.2 (4X4) Tradie 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $52,190
XLS 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $52,490
XLS 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $50,290
XLT 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $58,940
XLT 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $60,940
XLT 2.0 (4X4) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $59,940
XLT 2.0 HI-Rider (4X2) 2.0LDiesel1 speed automatic $53,040
XLT 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $57,440
XLT 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $58,440
XLT 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $59,440
XLT 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $56,240
XLT 3.2 (4X4) 3.2LDiesel6 speed manual $57,240
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2) 3.2LDiesel6 speed automatic $51,540

Ford Ranger 2021 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Ford Ranger here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Can an oil cooler keep the transmission cool in my 2014 Ford Ranger?

    If you talk to automatic transmission specialists, you’ll soon be told that it’s impossible to over-cool such a gearbox. An aftermarket transmission cooler is designed to work in conjunction with the vehicle’s standard transmission cooling system, so disabling the standard cooler is probably not a great idea.

    The problem with coolant entering the transmission is not an unknown one with some Ford (and other manufacturer’s) models and occurs when the standard cooler fails, allowing coolant into the gearbox and destroying the electronics and the gearbox hardware in short order. Unfortunately, this is a design thing rather than a maintenance issue, so the best thing you can do is service the vehicle regularly and make sure that the coolant is changed regularly. Even then, however, swarf from the production process (according to one theory at least) has been known to circulate through the radiator and cause damage to the piping that forms the transmission cooler. A radiator clean and flush might help stave off this process.

    If the manufacturer of the aftermarket cooler you’ve fitted can guarantee that the unit will cool at least as effectively as the standard unit on the Ranger, then you might consider disconnecting the standard cooler. Even so, you’d be wise to keep an eye on transmission temperatures, particularly if you tow anything or travel at high speed in high ambient temperatures.

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  • Is a Mazda BT-50 or Ford Ranger better for touring?

    It’s nice to see somebody taking the long view when it comes to vehicle ownership. Cars have become an increasingly throw-away commodity, and it seems a shame that all that engineering and development doesn’t get a longer lifespan.

    The BT-50 and Ranger you’ve nominated are, fundamentally, the same vehicles under the skin, so the choice will come down to the options fitted and the trim level that combines the features you want in one package. As a rule of thumb, the five-cylinder engine option will do a better job of hauling a slide-on camper into a headwind and will always be worth more as a trade-in (although that’s clearly not a concern for you).

    If you’re planning to keep the vehicle up to 300,000km, there’s a very good chance you’ll need to spend some money on the vehicle’s direct injection system at some point. A set of injectors and filters as well as an injector pump are all likely to need replacement over the distance you’ve nominated. That said, all modern common rail diesels seem to be in the same boat here, but if you’re prepared to service the vehicle religiously, then those expenses should be kept to a minimum. Take it as read, though, that a modern turbo-diesel will not appreciate neglect in this area.

    The other thing to watch out for is a vehicle that has already had a hard working life, as these dual-cabs often have. The tray-back you want also means the vehicle is likely to have been a work truck rather than a lifestyle accessory, so have any prospect checked independently before handing over the money.

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  • Why does my 2015 Ford Ranger cut out for no reason?

    It sounds very much like a computer problem rather than a hardware issue. When you switch the engine off and then back on again, you’re actually rebooting the on-board computer. I’d be trying a replacement ECU module (borrowed from another Ranger) to see if that fixes the problem. The problem is that because the reboot fixes the issue (temporarily) it might also re-set the computer’s memory, meaning it can’t `remember’ what went wrong and, therefore, won’t offer up the correct fault codes when you scan it. That said, I’d definitely give it a scan and see what pops up.

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See All Ford Ranger FAQs
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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