Browse over 9,000 car reviews

Toyota Fortuner 2022 review: Crusade

It looks a lot better but still performs like a great 4WD

After a large SUV that’s also a 4WD? The Toyota Fortuner is up there with the most rugged of off-roaders, and the 2022 version is no different.

Thanks to a model year makeover it has a lot more to offer than the last model. 

Built to be driven through creeks and up dirt roads, how does it fare everyday in suburbia, doing the school run for a family? That’s why I drove it to find out. 

I was in the Fortuner Crusade which is the top-of-the-range and costs $61,480, before on road costs and extras. It competes with cars like the Mitsubishi Pajero Sport and Ford Everest. Here’s how it did over seven days of driving for this week’s family review. 

The Fortuner Crusade is the top of the range. (Image: Dean McCartney) The Fortuner Crusade is the top of the range. (Image: Dean McCartney)

ShowHide all sections

How does it look? 

The Fortuner has been given a whole new look for 2022 and boasts a cool looking grille, elongated headlights and an overall tough looking exterior.

It’s still square-ish in shape with modern angles and looks like it means business. It’s definitely brought the Fortuner into the 2020s.  

The Fortuner is square-ish in shape with modern angles. (Image: Dean McCartney) The Fortuner is square-ish in shape with modern angles. (Image: Dean McCartney)

Inside is updated also. While it’s the top-of-the-range, bear in mind it primarily exists as a 4WD off-roading vehicle which aren’t generally built to be luxe. Still, it has a leather accented interior and a woodgrain look steering wheel. 

The centre console is well thought out, with everything in easy reach. It’s a big improvement over the last model and you can tell this interior is built to last over long camping trips, lots of off-roading and will go the distance. It feels good to drive on the road. 

How spacious is it? 

There is loads of space in the Fortuner, with a lot of leg and head space for front passengers, and there’ll be no jostling shoulders in between driver and front passenger either. It is roomy. 

There is a lot of leg and head space for front passengers. (Image: Dean McCartney) There is a lot of leg and head space for front passengers. (Image: Dean McCartney)

It’s very high off the ground which always makes it feel more spacious and my kids loved climbing up into the back seats.

I can easily sit back there at 161cm, and there’s enough room between my knees and the seat in front of me that taller adults and teenagers will be fine also. 

Taller adults and teenagers will be fine in the second row. (Image: Dean McCartney) Taller adults and teenagers will be fine in the second row. (Image: Dean McCartney)

The third row pops down from either side of the boot, which is strange to see, but also functional because it gives you more boots pace when that row is in use.

The third row pops down from either side of the boot. (Image: Dean McCartney) The third row pops down from either side of the boot. (Image: Dean McCartney)

It’s not the most comfortable spot to sit but it will be fine for kids, and adults will be happy in there over short distances. 

The boot space does get eaten into when these seats aren’t in use, but it still easily fits two large suitcases or a double pram. And when you’re only using one of these seats, the other can be folded up for extra boot space. 

With all seats upright the boot volume is 200 litres, with the third row folded that grows to 716L, and with the second and third rows flat you have 1080L to play with.

  • With all seats upright the boot volume is 200 litres. (Image: Dean McCartney)
With all seats upright the boot volume is 200 litres. (Image: Dean McCartney)
  • With the third row in place, the boot still fits some luggage. (Image: Dean McCartney) With the third row in place, the boot still fits some luggage. (Image: Dean McCartney)
  • With the third row folded space grows to 716L. (Image: Dean McCartney) With the third row folded space grows to 716L. (Image: Dean McCartney)
  • When you’re only using one seat in the third tow, the other can be folded up for extra space. (Image: Dean McCartney) When you’re only using one seat in the third tow, the other can be folded up for extra space. (Image: Dean McCartney)

How easy is it to use every day?

There are power operated front seats on this model, and a power tailgate which is helpful as the car sits so high. The second row tumbles forward so it’s easy to climb into the third row (though my kids just went straight in from the boot).

There’s a push-button start and it still has a manual handbrake, which sometimes you just appreciate pulling up. It’s quite the novelty these days. 

There are two cupholders in the front, a centre storage bin and bottle holders in each door.

Rear passengers get their own directional air vents, with two cupholders in the centre armrest. There’s a side step to climb into the car which we very much needed.

There are two cupholders in the front. (Image: Dean McCartney) There are two cupholders in the front. (Image: Dean McCartney)

How does it drive?

You can instantly tell it’s meant to be doing bigger things than the school run and driving to work, but that was not the Fortuner’s fate with me this week, so school runs it was!

There’s a loud 2.8L turbo-diesel engine that growls when you start it and take off. It’s got a lot of power to get up hills and cruise along highways. 

The handling is good, although I wouldn’t call it a smooth ride, as the car bounces over bumps and humps.

There’s a loud 2.8L turbo-diesel engine. (Image: Dean McCartney) There’s a loud 2.8L turbo-diesel engine. (Image: Dean McCartney)

But that's part of the off-roading base it’s made for. I did find while driving it in suburbia, the large turning circle is probably one of the only things that makes it a bit hard to zip around town. That and the heaviness on take-off. 

Steering is also heavier than in a mid-size SUV for example, but nothing out of the ordinary for a large 4WD.

Steering is heavier than in a mid-size SUV. (Image: Dean McCartney) Steering is heavier than in a mid-size SUV. (Image: Dean McCartney)

Still, I found it enjoyable to drive, especially because you start to enjoy the ruggedness. It’s nice not to be driving a city car sometimes, and you feel you can pull into a park, rip the handbrake up, jump down from the high seat and it just makes you feel a bit tougher for it.

Parking is good in the Fortuner. There’s a good reverse parking camera and while the steering is slightly heavier, it’s still not hard work to squeeze into a spot. 

How safe is it? 

The Fortuner Crusade comes with 'Toyota Safety Sense' which includes auto emergency braking with pedestrian and cyclist detection, lane departure alert, and high speed active cruise control. There’s also blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert.  

There are seven airbags, which cover driver and front passenger, and side curtain airbags. You’ll find two ISOFIX points and three top tether points. It received a maximum five-star ANCAP rating in 2019. 

The Fortuner Crusade comes with 'Toyota Safety Sense'. (Image: Dean McCartney) The Fortuner Crusade comes with 'Toyota Safety Sense'. (Image: Dean McCartney)

What’s the tech like? 

How much does it cost to own? 

The new Toyota Fortuner Crusade costs $61,480, before on road costs and extras.

The official combine fuel consumption figure is relatively low 7.6L/100km, and that’s because it’s diesel. I averaged 10.2L/100km this week doing mostly suburban driving. 

It’s covered by Toyota’s five year/unlimited warranty and servicing is required every 12 months/15,000km. Services are capped for the first three years at $260 each. 

The Fortuner is covered by Toyota’s five year/unlimited warranty. (Image: Dean McCartney) The Fortuner is covered by Toyota’s five year/unlimited warranty. (Image: Dean McCartney)


The Wrap

The Toyota Fortuner has had quite the makeover and is now competitive in the large 4WD category.

While we used it mainly for suburban driving, it does just make you want to drive to some rugged landscape and use it how it’s meant to be used. Still, the Fortuner fared well in the suburbs. It’s spacious inside with a large boot, and while it’s a bit loud for everyday with the large diesel engine, it does drive well. 

I gave it a family rating of 7.8 out of 10 and my kids gave it an 8, they loved that back row. 

Likes

New interior
Proper 4WD
Plenty of power

Dislikes

Loud engine
Large turning circle
Heavy steering

Scores

Nedahl:

3.9

The Kids:

4

$62,945

Based on new car retail price

VIEW PRICING & SPECS

Disclaimer: The pricing information shown in the editorial content (Review Prices) is to be used as a guide only and is based on information provided to Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd (Carsguide) both by third party sources and the car manufacturer at the time of publication. The Review Prices were correct at the time of publication.  Carsguide does not warrant or represent that the information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon this information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.