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Genesis G70 2021 review

The G70’s new nose is dominated by a narrow, 'two-stripe' split-headlight treatment.
EXPERT RATING
7.9
Genesis, a newcomer to the luxury car market, is a classic challenger brand. Its updated entry-level G70 is a sleek design, bristling with standard tech and features, wrapped up in a no-stone-unturned ownership package. Question is, are you ready to leave the established players behind, and take the plunge?

After an early identity crisis where the name was used under the Hyundai banner, Genesis, the Hyundai Group’s luxury brand, launched globally as a stand-alone entity in 2016, and formally arrived in Australia in 2019.

Keen to disrupt the premium market, it offers provocatively priced sedan and SUV models, bristling with tech and loaded with standard equipment. And already, its entry-level model, the G70 sedan, has been updated.

Genesis G70 2021: 3.3T Sport S.roof
Safety rating
Engine Type3.3L turbo
Fuel TypePremium Unleaded Petrol
Fuel Efficiency10.2L/100km
Seating5 seats
Price from$74,950

Does it represent good value for the price? What features does it come with?   8/10

Positioned as a “sports luxury sedan”, the rear-wheel drive G70 remains the entry-point to the Genesis brand’s four model line-up.

With the Audi A4, BMW 3 Series, Jaguar XE, Lexus IS, and Mercedes C-Class in its sights, the two-model G70 range starts at $63,000 (before on-road costs) with the four-cylinder 2.0T, stepping up to the V6 3.3T Sport at $76,000.

Standard equipment on both models includes, auto-dimming chromic mirrors, a panorama glass sunroof, ‘touch type’ front door handles, LED headlights and tail-lights, a larger, more powerful wireless charging pad (able to accommodate bigger devices), leather-appointed interior trim (including quilting and geometric patterned inserts), 12-way power-adjustable heated and ventilated front seats (with four-way lumbar support for the driver), dual-zone climate control, keyless entry and start, rain-sensing wipers, a 10.25-inch multimedia touchscreen, ambient (interior) lighting, satellite navigation (with live traffic updates), nine-speaker audio with digital radio. Apple CarPlay/Android Auto connectivity, and 19-inch alloy wheels.

  • Up front are LED headlights. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) Up front are LED headlights. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • At the rear are LED tail-lights. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) At the rear are LED tail-lights. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • The 10.25-inch touchscreen features  Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The 10.25-inch touchscreen features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • There's a panorama glass sunroof, which is standard across the range. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) There's a panorama glass sunroof, which is standard across the range. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

As well as a more powerful V6 engine, the 3.3T Sport adds ‘Electronic Control Suspension’, a dual muffler, active variable exhaust, a Brembo brake package, a limited slip differential, and a new “track-focused” ‘Sport+’ drive mode. 

A ‘Sport Line Package’, is a $4000 option on the 2.0T (included on the 3.3T Sport) adding dark chrome window trims, black ‘G Matrix’ air guides, a dark chrome and black grille, sports leather seats, suede headliner, alloy pedal trims, aluminium interior trim elements, the limited slip differential and Brembo brake package, as well as 19-inch sport alloy wheels.

  • There's a heated steering wheel. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) There's a heated steering wheel. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • Inside is a 15-speaker Lexicon premium audio system. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) Inside is a 15-speaker Lexicon premium audio system. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • The ‘Luxury Package’ adds a 12.3-inch 3D digital instrument cluster. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The ‘Luxury Package’ adds a 12.3-inch 3D digital instrument cluster. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

The ‘Luxury Package’, available on both models for an extra $10,000, brings safety and convenience features including, ‘Forward Attention Warning’, the ‘Intelligent Front Lighting System’, an acoustic laminated windscreen and front door glass, Nappa leather appointed interior, suede headlining, electronic steering wheel adjustment, a 12.3-inch 3D digital instrument cluster, a head-up display, 16-way electric driver’s seat (with memory), heated steering wheel, heated rear seats, a power rear tailgate, and 15-speaker Lexicon premium audio. ‘Matte Paint’ is also a $2000 option available on both models. 

Is there anything interesting about its design?   8/10

Genesis refers to its current design direction as ‘Athletic Elegance.’ And although it’s always a subjective call, I think this car’s sleek exterior aligns with that ambition.

Distinctive, without trying too hard, the G70’s makeover is dominated by a narrow, 'two-stripe' split-headlight treatment, a larger ‘crest’ grille (filled with a sporty ‘G-Matrix’ mesh design), and 19-inch alloy wheels, now standard on both models, fill the guards nicely.

  • The G70’s makeover is dominated by 'two-stripe' split-headlights. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) The G70’s makeover is dominated by 'two-stripe' split-headlights. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • The new nose is balanced by similar ‘quad lamp’ tail-lights at the rear. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) The new nose is balanced by similar ‘quad lamp’ tail-lights at the rear. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)

The new nose is balanced by similar ‘quad lamp’ tail-lights at the rear, as well as an integrated boot lip spoiler. There are beefy twin exhaust outlet graphics and a body-coloured diffuser on the V6, while car spotters should look out for a pair of exhaust outlets, on the driver’s side only, on the 2.0T.

This cabin feels properly premium, and although you can spot the basics of the outgoing car’s dash, it’s a big step ahead.

  • The 19-inch alloy wheels fill the guards nicely. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The 19-inch alloy wheels fill the guards nicely. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • The V6 model gets beefy twin exhaust outlet graphics and a body-coloured diffuser. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The V6 model gets beefy twin exhaust outlet graphics and a body-coloured diffuser. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

Not as overtly techy as a Merc, or elaborately styled like a Lexus, it feels mature without being stuffy. Quality, in terms of materials and attention-to-detail is high.

The standard partial leather upholstery is quilted for a high-end feel, and the new, bigger 10.25-inch multimedia touchscreen display looks slick and is easy to navigate. 

A highlight of the optional ‘Luxury Package’ is a 12.3-inch 3D digital instrument cluster.

  • This cabin feels properly premium. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) This cabin feels properly premium. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • The interior it feels mature without being stuffy. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The interior it feels mature without being stuffy. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

How practical is the space inside?   7/10

At close to 4.7m long, just over 1.8m wide, and 1.4m high, the G70 sedan is in the same dimensional ballpark as its A4, 3 Series, XE, IS, and C-Class competition.

Within that footprint, the wheelbase is a healthy 2835mm, and room up front is generous with plenty of head and shoulder room.

Storage runs to a lidded box/armrest between the seats, a big glove box, two cupholders in the console, a sunglasses compartment in the overhead console, and bins with room for small- to medium-sized bottles in the doors.

  • Room up front is generous. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) Room up front is generous. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • There's plenty of head and shoulder room.(3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) There's plenty of head and shoulder room.(3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

Power and connectivity options include two USB-A ports (power-only in the storage box and a multimedia connection at the front of the console), a 12-volt outlet and a larger, more powerful Qi (chi) wireless charging pad, able to cope with bigger devices.

The rear is where things get more challenging. The door aperture is relatively small and awkwardly shaped, and I, at 183cm/6’0” tall, found entry and egress a mild struggle.

  • Leg and toe room are lacking. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) Leg and toe room are lacking. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)
  • In the back, there's marginal headroom. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) In the back, there's marginal headroom. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

Once inside, the outgoing model’s foibles remain, with marginal headroom, barely adequate legroom (with the driver’s seat set to my position), and tight toe room.

In terms of width, you’re better off with two adults in the back. But if you do add a third, make sure they’re slight (or someone you don’t like). 

On the upside, there are twin adjustable air vents to keep everyone well ventilated, as well as a USB-A charge port, netted map pockets on the back of each front seat, two cupholders in the fold-down armrest, and small door bins.

Rear passengers get adjustable air vents. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) Rear passengers get adjustable air vents. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

Boot volume is 330L (VDA), which is below average for the class. For example, the C-Class offers up 455 litres, the A4 460 litres, and the 3 Series 480 litres.

It’s enough for the super-size CarsGuide pram, or the largest two suitcases from our three-piece set, but not a lot else. That said, the 40/20/40 split-folding rear seat opens up extra space.

Boot space is rated at 330 litres.(3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) Boot space is rated at 330 litres.(3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

If you want to hook up the boat, van or horse flat, your limit is 1200kg for a braked trailer (750kg unbraked). And the spare wheel is an alloy space-saver, which is a plus.

What are the key stats for the engine and transmission?   7/10

The G70 engine line-up is pretty straight forward; a choice of two petrol units, one four-cylinder, and a V6, both driving the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. No hybrid of any type, no electric, no diesel.

The Hyundai Group’s 2.0-litre ‘Theta II’ four-cylinder engine is an all-alloy unit featuring direct-injection, ‘Dual Continuous Variable Valve Timing’ (D-CVVT), and a single twin-scroll turbo to produce 179kW at 6200rpm, and 353Nm from 1400-3500rpm.

The 2.0-litre turbo four-cylinder  produces 179kW/353Nm. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) The 2.0-litre turbo four-cylinder produces 179kW/353Nm. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)

The 3.3-litre ‘Lambda II’ is a 60-degree V6, also an all-alloy construction, with direct-injection and D-CVVT, this time working in concert with twin single-scroll turbos to deliver 274kW at 6000rpm, and 510Nm from 1300-4500rpm.

A modest 2.0kW power increase for the V6 comes courtesy of changes to the dual-mode variable exhaust system. And if this engine pairing sounds familiar, look no further than the Kia Stinger, which uses the same powertrains.

The 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 delivers 274kW/510Nm. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 delivers 274kW/510Nm. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

How much fuel does it consume?   7/10

The official fuel economy figure for the Genesis G70 2.0T on the ADR 81/02 - urban, extra-urban cycle, is 9.0L/100km, the 2.0-litre turbo four emitting 205g/km of CO2 in the process. By comparison, the 3.3T Sport with 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6, is pegged at 10.2L/100km and 238g/km.

We covered city, suburban, and freeway running in both cars, and our real-world (dash indicated) figure for the 2.0T came in at 9.3L/100km, and 11.6L/100km for the 3.3T Sport.

Not bad, with what Genesis claims to be improved ‘Eco’ coasting functionality in the eight-speed auto, a likely contributor.

Recommended fuel is 95 RON premium unleaded, and you’ll need 60 litres of it to fill the tank (for both models). So, Genesis figures translate to a range of just under 670km for the 2.0T, and close to 590km for the 3.3T Sport. Our real-world results reduce those numbers to 645km and 517km, respectively. 

What safety equipment is fitted? What safety rating?   10/10

The Genesis G70 was already big on safety, scoring a maximum five-star ANCAP rating in 2018. But it’s even more of a focus in this update, with new standard active tech including a ‘Junction Turning’ capability added to the ‘Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist’ system (Genesis-speak for AEB) which already features vehicle, pedestrian, and cyclist detection.

Also new is ‘Blind-Spot Collision-Avoidance Assist - Rear’ ‘Safe Exit Warning’, ‘Blind Spot View Monitor’, ‘Lane Following Assist’, ‘Surround View Monitor’, ‘Multi Collision Brake’, ‘Rear Occupant Alert’, and ‘Rear Cross-Traffic Collision Avoidance Assist.’  

This is on top of existing crash avoidance features like ‘Lane Keeping Assist’, Driver Attention Warning’, ‘High Beam Assist’, ‘Smart Cruise Control’ (including ‘Stop & Go’ function), emergency stop signal, parking distance warning (forward and reverse), a reversing camera (with guidance), and tyre-pressure monitoring.

If all that doesn’t prevent an impact, passive safety measures now include 10 airbags - driver and passenger front, side (thorax and pelvis), front centre side, driver’s knee, rear side, and side curtain covering both rows. Plus, the standard active bonnet is designed to minimise pedestrian impact injuries. There’s even a first aid kit, hazard warning triangle, and roadside assistance kit.

There are also three child seat top tether points across the rear seat with ISOFIX anchors on the two outer positions for safely securing baby capsules/child seats

Warranty & Safety Rating

Basic Warranty

5 years / unlimited km warranty

ANCAP Safety Rating

ANCAP logo

What does it cost to own? What warranty is offered?   9/10

All Genesis models sold in Australia are covered by a five-year/unlimited km warranty, at this stage, in the premium space, matched only by Jaguar and Mercedes-Benz. 

The other big news is five years complimentary scheduled servicing (due every 12 months/10,000km), plus 24/7 roadside assist for the same period.

You’ll also receive free navigation map updates for five years, extending to 10 if you continue to have the car serviced at a Genesis centre.

And the icing on the cake is the ‘Genesis To You’ program with ‘Valet Service’ pick-up and drop-off. Nice.

What's it like to drive?   7/10

Hyundai claims the 2.0T will accelerate from 0-100km/h in 6.1 seconds, which is pretty handy, the 3.3T Sport hitting the same speed in only 4.7 seconds, which is properly quick.

Both models feature a launch control function, allowing you to reliably and consistently hit those numbers, and with each producing their maximum torque at less than 1500rpm, mid-range punch is healthy.

The G70 point nicely. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The G70 point nicely. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

In fact, you’d have to really want that extra V6 thrust under your right foot, because the 2.0T delivers sharp urban response, and comfortable highway cruising, with enough in reserve for confident overtaking. 

However, if you’re an ‘enthusiastic’ driver, the 3.3T Sport’s raucous induction noise and growly exhaust under load is a step above the four’s less dramatic sound.

Hyundai claims the 2.0T will accelerate from 0-100km/h in 6.1 seconds. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) Hyundai claims the 2.0T will accelerate from 0-100km/h in 6.1 seconds. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)

Like all Genesis models, the G70’s suspension has been tuned (in Australia) for local conditions, and it shows.

The set-up is strut front/multi-link rear, and both cars ride beautifully, There are five drive modes - ‘Eco’, ‘Comfort’, ‘Sport’, ‘Sport+’, and ‘Custom’, with the change from ‘Comfort’ to ‘Sport’ in the V6 tweaking the standard adaptive dampers immediately.

The 3.3T Sport will accelerate from 0-100km/h in  4.7 seconds. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) The 3.3T Sport will accelerate from 0-100km/h in 4.7 seconds. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

The shift-by-wire, eight-speed auto transmission is smooth, and the wheel-mounted manual paddles, with auto rev-matching on downshifts, dial up the engagement. But, while those DIY shifts are rapid, don’t expect dual-clutch snappiness.

Both cars point nicely, although the electrically-assisted steering, while far from numb, isn’t the last word in terms of road feel.

The G70’s suspension has been tuned for local conditions. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) The G70’s suspension has been tuned for local conditions. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)

The standard 19-inch alloys are shod with performance-focused Michelin Pilot Sport 4 rubber (225/40 fr / 255/35 rr) which deliver an impressive combination of refinement and grip.

Hustle into your favourite B-road corners and the G70, even in the Comfort setting, remains stable and predictable. The seat also starts to give you a bear hug and everything feels well buttoned down.

The 2.0T’s 100kg kerb weight advantage, with less mass over the front axle particularly, makes it feel more nimble in quick transitions, but the 3.3T Sport’s standard limited slip diff helps it put its power down even more effectively than the four cylinder car.

Hustle into your favourite B-road corners and the G70 remains stable and predictable. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured) Hustle into your favourite B-road corners and the G70 remains stable and predictable. (2.0T Luxury Pack variant pictured)

Braking on the 2.0T comes courtesy of 320mm ventilated discs at the front, and 314mm solid rotors at the rear, with all corners clamped by single-piston calipers. They provide ample, progressive stopping power.

But if you’re thinking of stepping up to the 3.3T Sport for towing or backroad fun, the standard Brembo brake package is more serious, with big vented discs all around (350mm fr / 340mm rr) four piston monobloc calipers up front and two-piston units at the rear.

Both models ride beautifully. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured) Both models ride beautifully. (3.3T Sport Luxury Pack variant pictured)

When it comes to ergonomics, the Genesis G70’s layout is simple and intuitive. Not big screen clean, like a Tesla, Volvo or Range Rover, but easy to use. It all makes sense thanks to a sensible combination of screens, dials and buttons.

Parking is straightforward, with good visibility to the car’s extremities, a quality reversing camera, and a nifty illuminated rear light guide providing additional reference when you’re negotiating tight spaces and gutters.

Verdict

It’s hard to prise owners away from established premium brands, and Genesis is still in its infancy. But there’s no doubt this refreshed G70’s performance, safety, and value will impress those willing to consider something other than the usual mid-size, luxury car suspects. Our pick is the 2.0T. Ample performance, all the standard safety tech, and a quality feel, for a lot less.

Pricing guides

$69,625
Based on Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)
Lowest Price
$59,300
Highest Price
$79,950

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
2.0T 2.0L, PULP, 8 SP $59,300 2021 Genesis G70 2021 2.0T Pricing and Specs
2.0T S.roof 2.0L, PULP, 8 SP $61,800 2021 Genesis G70 2021 2.0T S.roof Pricing and Specs
2.0T Sport 2.0L, PULP, 8 SP $63,300 2021 Genesis G70 2021 2.0T Sport Pricing and Specs
2.0T Sport S.roof 2.0L, PULP, 8 SP $65,800 2021 Genesis G70 2021 2.0T Sport S.roof Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
7.9
Price and features8
Design8
Practicality7
Engine & trans7
Fuel consumption7
Safety10
Ownership9
Driving7
James Cleary
Deputy Editor

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Pricing Guide

$74,950

Lowest price, based on new car retail price

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Disclaimer: The pricing information shown in the editorial content (Review Prices) is to be used as a guide only and is based on information provided to Carsguide Autotrader Media Solutions Pty Ltd (Carsguide) both by third party sources and the car manufacturer at the time of publication. The Review Prices were correct at the time of publication.  Carsguide does not warrant or represent that the information is accurate, reliable, complete, current or suitable for any particular purpose. You should not use or rely upon this information without conducting an independent assessment and valuation of the vehicle.