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2012 Suzuki Swift Pricing and Specs

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2012 Suzuki Swift

The Suzuki Swift 2012 prices range from $5,500 for the basic trim level Hatchback Swift GA to $13,995 for the top of the range Hatchback Swift Sport.

The Suzuki Swift 2012 is available in Regular Unleaded Petrol. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the Hatchback 1.4L 4 SP Automatic to the Hatchback 1.6L 7 SP CVT Auto Sequential.

A new generation of the Suzuki Swift Hatchback was released this year.

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Price Guide

$9,000

Based on 182 cars listed for sale in the last 6 months

Lowest Price

$5,500

Highest Price

$13,995

Explore prices for the

2012 Suzuki Swift

Hatchback

Suzuki Swift Models SPECS PRICE
Extreme 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $5,300 – 8,140
Extreme 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $4,600 – 7,370
GA 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $4,300 – 6,930
GA 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $3,800 – 6,160
GA RE.1 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $4,400 – 7,040
GA RE.1 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $3,900 – 6,380
GL 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $4,400 – 7,150
GL 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $4,000 – 6,490
GL RE.1 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $4,500 – 7,260
GL RE.1 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $4,100 – 6,600
GLX 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $5,200 – 8,030
GLX 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $4,600 – 7,370
GLX RE.1 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $5,300 – 8,250
GLX RE.1 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $4,700 – 7,590
RE.2 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol4 speed automatic $4,600 – 7,480
RE.2 1.4LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $4,200 – 6,820
Sport 1.6LRegular Unleaded PetrolCVT auto $6,500 – 10,120
Sport 1.6LRegular Unleaded Petrol6 speed manual $6,000 – 9,350
* Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price

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Suzuki Swift 2012 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Suzuki Swift 2012 here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Best first car options?

    Do not buy a Cruze, or buy a European brand. They will prove costly. It's best to go for the cars that are well proven over many years. The Lancer is a good one, but so too is the Toyota Yaris or Corolla, Suzuki Swift, Mazda2 or 3, or Mitsubishi Colt.

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  • Fun and reliable first cars

    Both are fun cars to drive, they’re relatively new, so should be reliable. I would prefer the Swift; I reckon you’ll get a better run out of it.

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  • Suzuki Swift 2012: Transmission "slipping" when going up hills

    While the less sporty versions of Suzuki’s Swift of this era used a conventional automatic transmission, the Swift Sport used a CVT transmission. And I’m wondering if maybe that’s all there is to your question. The CVT is quite capable of feeling like its slipping when you use lots of throttle, such as when going up a hill or accelerating to overtake. It’s actually quite normal and is the method a CVT uses to maximise fuel-economy by keeping the engine operating in its most efficient zone.

    But if you’ve owned the car for some time and its behaviour has changed, then it could be that the CVT is beginning to wear internally. Or perhaps it’s the torque-converter (that links the engine to the transmission) that is starting to wear out and allowing the engine to rev harder than it used to for a given road speed.

    Suzuki did recall this model (and conventional automatic versions) to check for loose bolts that secured the torque converter to the transmission. But if these became loose and fell out, you’d have no drive at all, so I don’t think that’s the problem here.

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