Ford Ranger Wildtrak 2017

  • By Marcus Craft
  • 26 July 2017

The Ford Ranger is a serious threat to the Toyota HiLux’s continued reign as king of the ute market. In fact, in January this year Ford’s popular workhorse pipped Toyota’s perennial champion as Australia’s best-selling ute for the third time in six months. The Ranger outsold the HiLux for the first time last September, and again in October.

It’s a much-needed boost for the company which has been otherwise languishing, and the upper-spec Wildtrak, crammed to its tray-top with good stuff, has been leading the pack.

Mazda’s BT-50 and Ranger, previously strong-DNA-sharing rivals, were like-for-like until 2015’s refreshed offerings were launched here. Now there are differences, mechanical and otherwise, which will be considered in this yarn.

The Ranger line-up, updated in the last quarter of 2016, now includes XL, XL Plus, XLS, XLT, the Wildtrak, and the XLT-based special edition FX4.

The special edition FX4. The special edition FX4.

The line-up’s 2.2-litre four-cylinder and 3.2-litre five-cylinder turbo-diesel engines now meet Euro 5 emissions standards.

Prices start from $27,390 (for the entry-level 4x2 Single Cab Chassis 2.2-litre TDCi) through to the FX4 Special Edition (3.2-litre turbo-diesel dual-cab with six-speed auto) at $61,115. The Wildtrak dual-cab 4x4 ($57,890, excluding on-roads, at time of writing) is the focus of this road test.

A stack of new standard features have been added to the range, including: 'SYNC3' with high-resolution 8.0-inch touchscreen (with Apple CarPlay/Android Auto integration and voice-command capability) (XLT, Wildtrak and FX4), navigation with 'Traffic Management Channel' (XLT, Wildtrak and FX4), electric power assisted steering (EPAS), adjustable speed limiter, cable shift manual transmission, auto stop/start on manual transmission (4x2 Hi-Rider and 4x4 models), 230 volt Inverter (Double and Super Cab models), tyre pressure monitoring system, projector headlamps (XLT, Wildtrak and FX4), rear box illumination (when 'Sports Bar' equipped) and dual colour 4.2-inch instrumentation screens (XLT, Wildtrak and FX4).
FX4 gets reverse camera, front and rear parking sensors, dynamic stability control and roll-over mitigation as standard.

High-tech features, such as advanced driver assist including 'Forward Collision Alert', 'Lane Keeping Aid', 'Automatic High Beam Control' and 'Adaptive Cruise Control', are available as part of the 'Tech Pack' option on XLT and FX4.

The Wildtrak gets the previously optional adaptive cruise with forward collision and lane departure warning, auto high beam and auto lane keeping as part of its standard gear.

Reversing camera and parking sensors are now standard on entry-level XL pick-up (excluding XL Plus) and XLS. The XLT also gets the camera and front parking sensors (to join its standard rear sensors).

There are now also two new colour options – 'Jet Black' (replaces 'Black Mica') and 'Meteor Grey' (replaces 'Metropolitan Grey') – for the range. The Wildtrak is available in five colours: 'Cool White', 'Meteor Grey', 'Aluminium', 'Jet Black', and 'Pride Orange', our tester’s colour. FX4 is available in 'Frozen White', 'Ingot Silver', 'Magnetic', or 'Shadow Black'.

Ranger was Australia’s top-selling workhorse, beating traditional sales king HiLux, in September, October and again in January this year.

Ford Australia grew its sales to 18,641 units (an increase of 13.7 percent) over the first quarter of 2016 – and that’s more than any other brand, according to March VFACTS industry sales figures.

That unit total is 2239 more vehicles than it sold in the first quarter last year – matched by no other car maker.

And that marks a resounding bounce-back from a brand that had been floundering after an 11-year decline in sales and is now Australia’s fifth most popular car brand, behind Toyota, Mazda, Hyundai and Holden.

The Ranger has brought Ford Australia back from the brink and the tweaked 2016 model was under pressure to improve upon Ranger PX MKI. And it has.

Among the many positive changes, cosmetic and mechanical, the most well-received so far has been the further-improved suspension yielding an even better ride in all models, something Ian Foston, the Ranger’s chief program engineer, had cited as a crucial goal.

Australia’s Product Development and Design Centre led design and development of the new Rangers and last year’s facelift delivered a nicely tweaked interior.

The Wildtrak has a striking hand-stitched and -crafted look to the inside of its cabin; it’s cool. The highly stylised, leather-accented design is not for everyone – especially those seeking out a touring-friendly, hose-out interior – but if you’re spending $60,000 or more for a ute, chances are you may prefer a little more style over substance. Otherwise, for a ute, fit and finish can’t be faulted.

What’s immediately evident when you climb inside is the 'big man' dash, built into the chunky beam spanning the space between driver's side door to front passenger door. The clean layout incorporating the new instrument cluster and centre panel has a real substantial feel to it and is well suited to the tough-truck persona this Ranger so comfortably conveys, inside and out.

For a ute, fit and finish can’t be faulted. For a ute, fit and finish can’t be faulted.

The driver's seat is eight-way power-adjustable with lumbar support; both front seats are heated. Steering is rake- but not reach-adjustable.

There are steering wheel mounted controls for entertainment, phone, instrument display, etc, and controls for dual-climate and more in the centre dash. Everything is well-placed and spaced for ease of use on the go.

The new integrated in-car tech slots in well with the horizontal block of the dash. The dash display includes plenty of information options, all clearly displayed.

'SYNC2', as found in our Wildtrak tester, has a few problems. It’s divided into four modes – entertainment, navigation, telephone and climate control. No strife there, but the system is still not as simple to operate as other ute multimedia units, including the HiLux’s. 

Navigation mode, especially, is on the wrong side of annoying because it’s not intuitive at all. Your finger has to tap all over the place, in no logical way or order, to punch in an address and work your way through the destination-setting process. It feels at odds with the rest of the ute because everything else – well, almost everything –works so well. The new system, 'SYNC3', will likely have addressed any SYNC2 niggles.

‘Feel’ is an important aspect of this ute because it’s a notion that’s applicable across the board. While there is a definite work-truck feel to the structure around you, supportive seating all-around (yes, even in the rear), and the use of soft-touch materials make the interior a more appealing and comfortable prospect for long trips over varied terrain.

The cabin is packed with real-world-useful features: a split, cooled centre console, grab handles on both A-pillars, two covered 12V sockets, two USB ports, glove box with a compartment for the owner’s manual, sunglasses holder in the roof, and light and mirror in the sun visor (something HiLux drivers would shudder at the thought of).

The Wildtrak has a striking hand-stitched and -crafted look to the inside of its cabin. The Wildtrak has a striking hand-stitched and -crafted look to the inside of its cabin.

There are bottle holders in every door and cup-holders for driver and front passenger in the centre console; fold-down cup-holders for the rear-seat passengers. The Wildtrak lacks HiLux’s convenient  push-in/pop-out cup-holders mounted on the dash.

Rear-seat passengers get air con vents and 12V and 230V plugs, plus there are storage bins under the rear seats.

Test-driving a loan vehicle for longer than a few days gives a writer time to live with the vehicle, driving it, day in, day out, and to pick up on any niggles or flaws that may only be noticeable once someone has experienced it as a regular driver would.

One of the things we noticed was that it’s not quick and easy to fit booster seats to the rear seat. In something like the HiLux, it’s a simple process of removing the headrests, using the convenient push-buttons, and then looping restraining belts through to the easy-to-access, high-mounted anchor point. 

In the Wildtrak you need a tool, or at least something small and pointy, to help depress one side of the buttons at the base of each headrest ‘leg’ to get the headrests off. Then the whole seat needs to be folded forward, so you can get the restraining belt from each booster seat to its own anchor point.

Not easy when you’ve got to belt in two seats and they both get in the way – even trying to do one seat at a time – when you have to fold the rear seat forward to access that aforementioned anchor point.

The Wildtrak has six airbags and a maximum five-star ANCAP rating.

The previous Ranger was a good looking thing on the outside to start with, so any changes to the exterior for the next generation were always going to have to err on the right side of subtle, in order to not upset fans and to entice those buyers in search of a blokey ute which could also fit in well in cityscapes.

It’s a big truck with plenty of presence.

Thankfully, Ford’s creatives haven’t messed too much with the existing, successful formula.

It’s a big truck with plenty of presence. The grille and each bulky ‘shoulder’ make for a bold, eye-catching front end; the bumper’s ‘bush guard’, side steps and sports bar add to the stylish, yet functional feel of the ute as a touring package. (As I often say: look at the photos, make up your own mind.) Front quarter panel vents now protrude. Nice touches include a cargo light, mounted on the sports bar, pointing down into the tray, to illuminate that area in low-light conditions. It could be a lot brighter though.

Our Wildtrak wore 'Pride Orange' colours on the outside. I’m not a big fan of that colour but a lot of passers-by were, it seemed; they offered up their praise of the colour unprompted.

Did Ford Australia actually invent the ute, way back in 1933, right here in Australia? Some vehicle historians would have us believe so, but we tend to agree with Aussie off-roading legend, and old mate of ours, Allan Whiting, who has an alternative view.

Big Al reckons the first ute was developed in the very early years of the 20th century, when a 1903 Oldsmobile was fitted with a ute-like tub.

Dodge or Ford USA might also be able to lay claim to having developed the first ute due to Dodge’s 1924 soft-top pick-up, or the ute-like 1925 Ford Model T.

The Aussie ute’s origins are thought to have started in 1932. According to information from history buffs at Sydney’s Power House Museum, a farmer wrote to the then boss of Ford Australia that year asking for the carmaker to build, “a two-in-one car and truck, something I can go in to church on Sunday, and carry pigs to market on Monday”.

A designer at Ford’s Geelong plant, Lew Bandt, set to work modifying a 1933 two-door Ford V8 Coupe. He built a tray and reinforced the chassis for load-carrying duties. Ford Australia gave it the green light and the ute went into production in 1934.

If you buy a new Ranger you have a choice of two engines; the latest-generation Ford 3.2-litre TDCi that delivers 147kW at 3000rpm and 470Nm from 1750 to 2500rpm; or a 2.2-litre TDCi (118kW and 385Nm).

Our Wildtrak auto had the 3.2, which has had several upgrades including new fuel injectors, smaller variable-vane turbos, cylinder-head revisions and an updated exhaust gas re-circulation system, aimed at better performance as well as improved noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) levels.

The latest-generation Ford 3.2-litre diesel delivers 147kW at 3000rpm and 470Nm from 1750 to 2500rpm. The latest-generation Ford 3.2-litre diesel delivers 147kW at 3000rpm and 470Nm from 1750 to 2500rpm.

Both engines are available with a six-speed manual gearbox or six-speed automatic transmission. Wildtrak buyers can choose between a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission, calibrated to maximise performance, refinement and efficiency, according to Ford Australia. The BT-50 didn't get the Ranger's auto re-calibration as part of its update.

The Wildtrak is 5355mm long, 2163mm wide and 1848mm high. It handles city driving, including back streets and tight parking manoeuvres with ease – and its new steering system is a big factor in this.

The Ranger now has electric power-assisted steering (EPAS), not hydraulic assistance as before. This makes a real difference in low-speed driving, because EPAS offers variable assistance, and extra help is given in slow-going (parking). 

The level of assistance provided depends on speed, steering wheel angle, cornering forces and acceleration or deceleration. The BT-50’s steering is not variable.

When you get out on the open road, the Wildtrak’s steering retains that precise feel, but has more of a definite weight to it, which inspires confidence, especially with a load in the tray, or a boat and trailer hitched up to the back.

The lack of a power steering pump (used in a traditional power-steering system) is claimed to have made the new Ranger quieter and improved its fuel efficiency by about three per cent.

The six-speed auto is an all-round impressive unit. Its predictive mode, which enables it to change gears when it reckons it should – is mostly spot-on, except for when you’re towing.

When compared to the BT-50, the new Ranger, with greater comfort and better handling, comes out on top in the ride stakes. The BT-50 didn't get the Ranger's Aussie-specific suspension tune with its update and it shows.

The Wildtrak feels very compliant and comfortable on all surfaces; the BT-50, with its firmer damping, is not quite up to the Ford’s standard. Having said that, these utes do exhibit some body roll when cornering at speed.

The six speed auto is an all-round impressive unit. The six speed auto is an all-round impressive unit.

NVH is another area in which the Ranger compares favourably with its old virtual stablemate, the BT-50. Having climbed out of a BT-50 only days before this test, the difference between the two was marked.

The Ranger’s interior has been enhanced for better, more car-like NVH levels than ever before and it’s a lot better than the BT-50’s, which, when scrutinised on their own terms, were pretty bloody good, but, in direct comparison with the Wildtrak’s, felt a touch rough. 

Changes aimed at improving refinement included fluid-filled engine-mounts,  as well as more sound-deadening below the floor and on the firewall. The Ranger immediately feels smoother and more refined, with less clatter than the BT-50. However, for all the fuss made about the developments targeting, when really pushed, there’s still a fair bit of engine and induction noise through the front end.

The big boast for Ford is that, they say, this suite of safety gear is not in the HiLux.

Among the numerous driver-assist technologies packed into the new Rangers are: 'Adaptive Cruise Control' (with 'Forward Collision Warning Alert'), 'Lane Departure Warning', 'Lane Keep Assist', 'Driver Impairment Monitor', 'Trailer Sway Control' and a tyre pressure monitoring system.

The big boast for Ford is that, they say, this suite of safety gear is not in the HiLux. In fact, they claim some $60,000 luxury passenger cars don’t even have it.

Other smart technologies available include 'Hill Launch Assist', to help the driver confidently start off from a slope, whether in forward or reverse; 'Hill Descent Control', which uses the traction control system to help the driver descend steep slopes at a constant speed; 'Adaptive Load Control', which adjusts the 'Dynamic Stability Control' system based on vehicle load; and 'Emergency Brake Assistance', which provides additional pressure to the brake system to increase braking force when the brakes are applied quickly in an emergency situation.

'Emergency Assistance', available across the range, is designed to deliver critical information directly to Triple Zero (000) operators, indicating that a Ford vehicle has been involved in an accident, advising the vehicle’s GPS location before opening the line for hands-free communication with the vehicle occupants.

Emergency Assistance uses the driver’s own paired mobile phone via Bluetooth and runs in the background once the phone is properly paired with SYNC3 and is within mobile phone range. SYNC3 with Emergency Assistance is free for the life of the car.

All of this gear is great, no doubt about it, but it can be off-putting. The Wildtrak’s many warning/safety systems tend to be overly sensitive and intrusive, and don’t allow for some natural driving moves, for example, overtaking in city traffic.

Lane Keep Assist throws a jerky move into the steering, seemingly if you merely think about heading for the centre line. These alerts can be switched off – in fact they must be switched off when driving in the bush because proximity alerts sound when you get anywhere near the slightest bit of shrubbery.

At the end of a 100km bitumen-only loop (which we repeated towing and laden, see below), we’d used 9.5L/100km.

Because Wildtrak owners are likely to do a bit of towing, we decided to throw a decent-sized boat and trailer – more than 1500kg and 7.5m long (including the outboard-motor leg) – on the back and do some testing of our own. 

Maximum towing capacity is 3500kg, so we were nowhere near it, but any sensible driver won’t push the limits because car makers’ towing capacity figures are, at best, approximations.

The purpose of our towing loop was to test the Wildtrak’s driveability, fuel consumption and safety with a big load.

The drive-loop was a 100km through city streets, coastal roads and highway stretches with plenty of uphills and downhills thrown in for good measure.

The drive-loop was a 100km through city streets, coastal roads and highway stretches. The drive-loop was a 100km through city streets, coastal roads and highway stretches.

We were fully fuelled and weighed at a weighbridge at the start of each loop, then we filled after the entire distance had been driven to see how much go-juice we’d used.

The Wildtrak’s 3220mm wheelbase (the same as the BT-50’s) is the longest of the current dual-cabs. That stretch gives it a damn good platform on which to tow.

According to Ford specs, the Wildtrak auto has a claimed kerb weight of 2271kg and a payload of 925kg (same as current HiLux’s) and a GVM of 3200kg, the best of any ute.

When towing with the Wildtrak, for starters, hitching up is no problem: this Ranger’s reversing camera depicts a centre line on its screen, so even if you’re usually a bit of a shocker when backing up to a trailer, you’ll have no issue here. And there's a 12-pin plug standard.

Hitching up is no problem. Hitching up is no problem.

With the boat and trailer on the back, driver, front-seat passenger, camera gear and a full tank of diesel, we tipped the scales at 4300kg. Maximum gross combination mass is listed as 6000kg, so we were well within that limit.

From the get-go, the Wildtrak settled nicely with the load and drove supremely well; on stretches of highway, along windy coastal roads, on long sweeping downhill bends and in and out of traffic.

It's worth noting, trailer sway control is standard.

Acceleration is smooth, strong and reliable – no faltering under load at any time. On-road, it’s a smooth and quiet tow truck – like the load wasn’t there at all.

If it was working hard to do anything – especially get up the long, twisting hills we tackled – we weren’t aware of it. And it's worth noting, trailer sway control is standard.

The Wildtrak’s engine power and torque meant it blasts through any challenges. Its engine braking on downhills is solidly reliable.

Towing can be stressful; a driver has to be comfortable and have confidence in the tow vehicle to be safe on the road, and that’s easily achieved in the Wildtrak. Driving position affords plenty of visibility all-round and combined with the superb way the vehicle itself copes with the load makes for a hassle-free driving experience.

A minor niggle: once we’d crested a hill and drove onto flatter road, there was a lengthy pause between the upshift from second to third; it held the gear for too long, which was jarring.

At the end of the loop, we’d used 15.0L/100km. 

Then it was time to unhitch the boat and trailer and do a loop with a load in the tray. Time constraints forced us to cut the loading process short, so we weren’t able to put as much in the Wildtrak as we would have liked to.

With two concrete blocks in the tray, driver, front-seat passenger, camera gear and full tank of diesel, we tipped the scales at 2660kg.

The tray is a claimed 1549mm long (at floor level), 1560mm wide (1139mm wide at the wheel-arches), and 511m deep (at centreline of axle).

We tipped the scales at 2660kg. We tipped the scales at 2660kg.

The Wildtrak has a tray liner, which houses a 12V socket and tie-down points.

The roller shutter over the tray can be left open or closed and locked, for load-carrying safety or gear security if you’re parked. It operates off a fairly simple, key lock/unlock system on top and towards the rear of the cover itself, but it can be a bit tricky to disengage it from its locked position and slide it open, until you get the hang of it. 

There’s no need to clamber into the tray and drag the cover closed by hand; you simply use the attached strap to pull the cover back to its original position.

On the downside; the shutter rolls away into a bulky metal compartment at the cabin-end of the tray, which eats into a lot of tray space. To maximise tray space, the whole unit can be removed.

At the end of the loop we'd used 11.5L/100km. At the end of the loop we'd used 11.5L/100km.

Again, loaded and away, the Wildtrak handled the burden like it wasn’t there. Sure, it wasn’t a huge load, but still, over the 100km loop through different traffic conditions, on the highway and up and down the same hills as before, the Wildtrak performed really well.

At the end of the loop we’d used 11.5L/100km. 

The new Ranger hasn’t lost a step in the bush; if anything, it’s a bit better than before.

We tackled water crossings, steep, rocky uphills and downhills, tight bush tracks, as well as a few, short sandy runs.

It has a part-time four-wheel drive (4WD) system with low range transfer case. The driver is able to shift from 4x2 to 4x4 high on the fly, using a dial on the centre console. The vehicle must be stationary for shifts from 4x2 high to 4x4 low.

The driver is able to shift from 4x2 to 4x4 high on the fly, using a dial on the centre console. The driver is able to shift from 4x2 to 4x4 high on the fly, using a dial on the centre console.

In the auto Wildtrak, high range is 1:1 ratio; low range is 2.717:1. Torque is available from low in the rev range, handy for that soft, sandy terrain.

There are buttons to engage the rear diff lock and hill descent control, which works below 40km/h and down to 2km/h.

If we ever lost grip in the bush it was due to the city-friendly Bridgestone Dueler H/Ts rather than any fault of the Wildtrak’s 'Brake Traction Control System' or any of its other off-road tech. The rubber’s on 18-inch alloys.

Wheel articulation is generally sound, although not as good as the HiLux. Wheel articulation is generally sound, although not as good as the HiLux.

Ground clearance (unladen) is 237mm. Wading depth, which we never got near testing (don’t blame us, blame the lack of swollen creeks nearby), is listed as 800mm. Air intakes are located up high between the inner and outer guards on the driver’s side; the alternator is high in the engine bay.

Wheel articulation is generally sound, although not as good as the HiLux’s; they don’t flex as far as the Toyota’s and so are left scrambling in the air, where the HiLux’s would be gripping, or at least flicking, dirt.

The side-steps look nice and are handy for getting in and out of the Wildtrak, but they are vulnerable to coping a hiding from logs and rocks in the bush. (Our loan vehicle had already clocked up more than 17,000km before we stepped into it and the side-steps, especially the driver-side one, had obviously taken a real hammering during its tours of duty up to that time.)

While all of the off-road numbers (approach, departure etc) check out, our towbar, ruining rampover, ran afoul of the top edges of a few ditches we threw the Wildtrak into.

The Wildtrak feels bigger, less manoeuvrable in the rough stuff than the HiLux; the difference isn’t substantial but it’s a lingering, driver-feel thing.

If you plan on getting stuck, don’t worry, because there’s solid recovery points.

It looks great and, with this most recent raft of improvements, Ford Ranger Wildtrak is now even better than before; more gutsy, more refined and packed with even more features.

Sure, at $60,000, it’s a chunk of cash to throw down, but this on- and off-road champion is slick, safe and sure of itself.

Explore the Ford Ranger lineup

There are 80 models

2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x2)
Median price
$22,950 – 31,300
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x2)
Median price
$22,950 – 31,300
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x2)
Median price
$22,950 – 31,300
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x2)
Median price
$22,950 – 31,300
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$25,490 – 36,390
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$25,490 – 36,390
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$25,490 – 36,390
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$25,490 – 36,390
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$27,990 – 43,400
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$33,000 – 52,100
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$33,000 – 52,100
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$33,000 – 52,100
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$33,000 – 52,100
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$35,850 – 50,500
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$36,045 – 52,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$36,045 – 52,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$36,045 – 52,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$36,045 – 52,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$36,045 – 52,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 Hi-Rider (4x2)
Median price
$36,045 – 52,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$36,280 – 49,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$36,280 – 49,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,662 – 46,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,662 – 46,990
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$37,988 – 51,800
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
3.2 XL Plus (4x4)
Median price
$38,788 – 53,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
3.2 XL Plus (4x4)
Median price
$38,788 – 53,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
3.2 XL Plus (4x4)
Median price
$38,788 – 53,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
3.2 XL Plus (4x4)
Median price
$38,788 – 53,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
3.2 XL Plus (4x4)
Median price
$38,788 – 53,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
3.2 XL Plus (4x4)
Median price
$38,788 – 53,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$38,790 – 44,290
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$38,790 – 44,290
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$38,790 – 44,290
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$38,790 – 44,290
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$38,790 – 44,290
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XL 2.2 (4x4)
Median price
$38,790 – 44,290
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 2.2 (4x4)
Market Price
$39,600 – 46,640
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 2.2 (4x4)
Market Price
$39,600 – 46,640
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$40,990 – 64,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$40,990 – 64,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$40,990 – 64,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$40,990 – 64,888
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 2.2 (4x4)
Market Price
$41,470 – 48,840
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLS 2.2 (4x4)
Market Price
$41,470 – 48,840
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$44,990 – 56,790
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$44,990 – 56,790
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$44,990 – 56,790
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
XLT 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$44,990 – 56,790
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
FX4 SPECIAL EDITION
Median price
$48,000 – 59,998
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
FX4 SPECIAL EDITION
Median price
$48,000 – 59,998
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
FX4 SPECIAL EDITION
Median price
$50,997 – 61,115
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
FX4 SPECIAL EDITION
Median price
$50,997 – 61,115
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
Wildtrak 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$51,000 – 68,490
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
Wildtrak 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$51,000 – 68,490
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
Wildtrak 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$51,990 – 62,885
ANCAP Rating
2017 Ute
Wildtrak 3.2 (4x4)
Median price
$51,990 – 62,885
ANCAP Rating

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