Honda HR-V Problems

No car is perfect, but we've gathered everything relating to the Honda HR-V reliability here to help you decide if it's a smart buy.

Should I buy a Hyundai Kona or Honda HR-V?

Answered by CarsGuide 18 Mar 2021

It’s nice to see that the worldwide web has put Carsguide in touch with people in the USA and that they’re prepared to ask for advice from half a planet away. Meanwhile, if safety is your number one priority, then you really need to find a vehicle with all the latest driver aids such as autonomous emergency braking, lane-keeping assistance and rear-cross-traffic alert. These are the new safety must-haves now that air-bags, stability control and other systems are considered par for the course.

The catch with your situation (from our point of view) is that the vehicles we assess and test in Australia don’t necessarily correlate with the North American buying experience. The specifications of Australian-delivered cars don’t always line up with those of a USA-market vehicle, and that can mean that the safety kit fitted here isn’t mirrored by the same make and model sold on your side of the pond. Don’t forget, too, that some makes and models (Hyundai and Kia are good examples) often feature Australian input into the suspension and steering settings to make them more palatable to an Australian audience. As a result, the same car without that input (such as the version sold in the US) might drive very differently.

Show More

How do you change a car's suspension?

Answered by CarsGuide 17 Feb 2021

This car was not universally panned for its poor ride quality, but comfort is a very subjective thing and if you’re felling the bumps, then you’re feeling them. And you’re not alone, because many owners of SUVs have experienced the very same thing.

By raising the ride height of a hatchback to create an SUV or cross-over, manufacturers suddenly find themselves with a vehicle that has a higher centre of gravity. That means that the car tends to roll more heavily in corners. The solution to keeping the car a tidy handler is to make the springs (suspension) stiffer and, therefore, reduce the amount of body-roll that is felt. But that’s often at the expense of ride quality. And that’s probably what you’re feeling in your Honda.

You can change the springs for a softer set, but you’ll be dramatically changing the car’s dynamic responses and could even find this change throws up all sorts of ABS and ESP anomalies as well as making the car technically unroadworthy. But all is not lost.

The other thing that has a dramatic affect on a car’s ride quality is the wheel and tyre package fitted. As manufacturers charge more for each hike in trim level, they also tend to fit tyres that are wider and have a smaller sidewall profile, for a sportier appearance. But here’s the problem: The smaller the tyre’s sidewall (it’s profile) the fewer bumps that tyre can absorb before it passes that bump on to the suspension and, ultimately, into the base of your seat. I’m tipping your car is an up-spec HR-V with 18-inch wheels and tyres and these, in fact, are the cause of the choppy ride you dislike so much.

The solution might be to fit the 17 or even 16-inch wheels and tyres from a lower-spec HR-V. You might find a Honda dealer who will swap your wheels and tyres for another set or even another HR-V owner who wants to upgrade to your 18-inch tyres in exchange for their 16-inchers. Opting for a smaller tyre with a higher sidewall is where we’d always start when attempting to improve a vehicle’s ride quality.
 

Show More

How can I fix the seat belt in my 2020 Honda HR-V?

Answered by CarsGuide 19 Jan 2021

Inertia-reel seat-belts have saved lots of lives by ensuring that they’re always adjusted correctly on whoever is wearing them. They work by being able to mechanically detect sharp forces (such as would be expected in a crash) and locking instantly, limiting the movement of bodies in the process. In the meantime, they offer a huge degree of convenience by allowing you to move around in your seat without being squeezed by the belt.

But they can suffer problems with the inertia mechanism which can jam and lead to the problem you currently have. This is often because the car is parked on an angle, causing the mechanism to `think’ that the car has pitched violently and locking the belt as a precaution, even though it’s standing still. So test the seat-belt with the car sitting on flat ground. To be honest, inertia-reel belts are more likely to refuse to unravel to allow you to fasten them than they are to fail to wind-in or retract, so maybe there’s a small manufacturing flaw in the belt in question.

The good news is that your car is still under its factory warranty, so a trip to a Honda dealership should be able to sort the problem quickly and simply and at zero cost to you. The quickest, safest fix would be to simply replace the whole seat-belt unit and that’s probably what a dealer will do.

Show More

What are the pros and cons of a 2018 MG ZS?

Answered by CarsGuide 9 Sep 2020

ZS pros include cheap pricing, an easy driving experience and a comparatively spacious interior compared to other direct rivals like a Mazda CX-3. The dash is pleasant, there is a decent amount of equipment and the controls are all simple to use. It should also be fairly inexpensive to run and service, though earlier ZSs like yours require six-monthly rather than 12-monthly service intervals.

There are two engine options - a 1.5-litre four-cylinder model with a four-speed auto on the base Excite, or a 1.0-litre turbo three-cylinder version on higher-specification Excite Plus and Essence grades with a six-speed auto. Note that the latter powertrain is more expensive to service.

Plus, there's still a fair chunk of the manufacturer's warranty left, which is seven years, while capped-price servicing is also offered.

But the ZS does not offer AEB Autonomous Emergency Braking, so only rates a four-star ANCAP crash-test rating.

Additionally, the ZS's suspension is on the firm side in terms of dealing with road bumps, which might upset some occupants, yet there is not much of the 'fun factor' in regards to steering and handling finesse that rivals like the CX-3, Suzuki Vitara, Honda HR-V, Hyundai Venue, Holden Trax, Ford EcoSport and Hyundai Kona offer in spades.

We've also heard complaints about the interior's perceived quality being sub-par, cabin storage isn't generous and Android Auto isn't supported (though Apple CarPlay is).

Finally, the ZS' resale value trails all of the aforementioned competitors by a significant margin, meaning it's on track to be worth less when the time comes to on-sell it.

Show More

My 2019 Honda HR-V flashing "Park" at me, what does it mean?

Answered by CarsGuide 28 Aug 2020

The problem sounds like a fairly major melt-down of some of the car’s computer systems which is leading it to think there’s a range of major issues that have all occurred at once. Modern cars use lots and lots of sensors that all feed information back to the computer that controls the driveline (the ECU) and everything else (the body computer) and if any of these sensors are kaput, the car can issue you with headlines like the one you’re seeing.

The good news is that it shouldn’t cost you anything to fix, a 2019 Honda is well and truly still within the factory warranty period, so it’s the dealer’s problem to fix, not yours. Even if you bought the car second-hand, the new-car warranty transfers to subsequent owners (you) so don’t be afraid to phone your nearest dealership and book the car in to be inspected, diagnosed and fixed.

The only catch in all of this is if the car hasn’t been serviced correctly. It doesn’t need a Honda-dealership service history, but it does need service-handbook proof that it has been maintained according to the manufacturer’s schedule by an accredited workshop. If it hasn’t, Honda (or any other manufacturer) can sometimes use that neglect as an out when it comes to fixing problems under warranty. If, for instance, you turned up with a three-year-old car that had covered 60,000km but had never had an oil change or service, you’d probably find the manufacturer would simply tear up the warranty on the spot, even if it was technically a five-year warranty.

Show More

What car should I replace my 2011 Hyundai i20 with?

Answered by CarsGuide 22 Aug 2020

You’ve layed out some challenging requirements here. You’d like a small SUV with a bit of ride comfort and clearly a bit of performance too, given your question about the i30 N.
I think you’ll find the ride harsh on the i30 N, especially since you found the ride on the Kona harsh already. Keep in mind the i30 N is a hot hatch and has the suspension to match.
I find the Subaru XV has very nice ride comfort for the small SUV segment, but I also feel that you will be disappointed with the performance from its 2.0-litre engine. You may also want to consider the new Hybrid Toyota C-HR. The Hybrid drive gives it a smidge of extra kick and it’s a fuel consumption hero, too.
For a better blend of performance and ride, really only the Volkswagen T-Roc and Skoda Karoq are going to excel in the small SUV crowd. In terms of ownership both now have five year warranties, and you can (and should) pre-package five years of servicing on top at a discount.

Show More

Honda HR-V 2019: Does it have adaptive cruise control?

Answered by CarsGuide 7 Aug 2020

One of the gripes with the Honda HR-V (I’ll assume that’s the model you’re talking about; there is no Honda HR-C) is that you need to pay for the very top-shelf model before you get the full safety package. In the HR-V’s case, that includes full forward-collision warning, autonomous braking and lane-departure warning. The catch is, you can’t even pay extra and option this package of the lower sped models.

In any case, it’s academic from your point of view, Noel, because even the range-topping VTi-LX misses out on rear-cross traffic alert, blind-spot monitoring and the active cruise-control you’re looking for. Plenty of the competition has these features and no doubt when Honda replaces the current model HR-V, those features will get a look in.

Show More
RECALL: More 20,000 Honda Jazz, City, Civic, Accord, HR-V, CR-V and NSX cars and SUVs have faulty fuel pumps

RECALL: More 20,000 Honda Jazz, City, Civic, Accord, HR-V, CR-V and NSX cars and SUVs have faulty fuel pumps

16 Jul 2020 · by Justin Hilliard

Honda Australia has recalled 22,366 examples of the Jazz, City, Civic, Accord, HR-V, CR-V and NSX over an issue with their fuel pumps

Read More

Honda HR-V 2019: Why does the radio cut out when I use the sat nav?

Answered by CarsGuide 6 Jun 2020

It doesn’t sound right to me that simply having the navigation turned on would preclude listening to the radio as well. The navigation will certainly cut across the radio when it needs to deliver the next direction, but beyond that it should just work away in the background. If that’s not the case, I’d say you have a problem within the system.

My insiders at Honda tell me that the MY2021 HR-V (released last month) has an upgraded entertainment system that has been developed in response to customer input and is said to be a better all-round device with greater connectivity. At this stage, there’s no word on whether the system will be able to be retro-fitted to your model Honda, but there’s a chance that it might be. A chat with your dealer sounds in order.

Show More

Honda HR-V 2020: Will this model have an upgraded design?

Answered by CarsGuide 11 Oct 2019

It’s anticipated that the HRV will get a minor upgrade only.

Show More

Over 8,000 questions answered by CarsGuide

Search
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

Complete Guide to Honda
HR-V

Reviews, price, specs and more