Menu

Browse over 9,000 car reviews

Sorry, there are no cars that match your search

You are here

Mitsubishi Outlander LS 2WD 2.0 manual 2017 review

EXPERT RATING
7.1
Andrew Chesterton road tests and reviews the new Mitsubishi Outlander LS 2WD 2.0 manual with specs, fuel consumption and verdict.

Andrew Chesterton road tests and reviews the new Mitsubishi Outlander LS 2WD 2.0 manual with specs, fuel consumption and verdict.

When it comes to mid-size SUVs, the cheapest model in the range is also often the rarest. And that's because a manufacturer isn't really expecting to sell many of them. Sure, it's nice to have a headline price on a billboard somewhere, but when we actually venture into a dealership we're quickly talked into at least an automatic transmission, and sometimes much, much more.

  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown) 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown)
  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown) 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown)
  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown) 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown)
  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown) 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown)
  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown) 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown)
  • 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown) 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander (LS Manual variant shown)

MORE: Read the full Mitsubishi Outlander 2017 review

But what if you stick to your guns and insist on driving off in the cheapest possible model? What do you actually get for your money? Well, if that model is the recently refreshed MitsubishI Outlander LS ($28,750), the answer is, quite a lot, actually.

The LS sits at the very bottom of a convoluted Outlander range available with a variety of seats, engines and transmissions and stretches all the way to $47,500. But today we're playing at the other end of the sandpit.

Mitsubishi Outlander 2017: LS (4x2)
Safety rating
Engine Type2.0L
Fuel TypeRegular Unleaded Petrol
Fuel Efficiency7L/100km
Seating5 seats
Price from$19,962

Is there anything interesting about its design?  7/10

It might not offer the most sleek and modern design, but neither does the LS look like an entry-level model from the outside.

Standard 18-inch alloys feature, along with more silver plastic than a tarpaulin factory. The 'Diamond Shield' (Mitsubishi's SUV design language) front end is a little plasticky for our tastes, but it's undoubtedly bold, while the DRLs and standard roof rails are a nice touch, too.

Inside, the cloth seats carry a cool 3D-style pattern, while the carbon-look inserts lift the feel of a simple dash layout. Elsewhere, a liberal dose of gloss-black plastic in the steering wheel and centre console add a hint of premium feel, too.

That said, the blanked out option buttons that sit under the touchscreen are a major sore point, and serve as a constant reminder you didn't spring for a more expensive model.

How practical is the space inside?  8/10

Opting for five seats in a car that can fit seven can only be good news for luggage space, and the Outlander LS boot is unsurprisingly accommodating. Expect 477 litres in five-seat models, though that number climbs to 1608 litres with the 60/40 rear seat folded flat.

Elsewhere, you'll find two cup holders shared between front seat passengers, and huge pockets for bottles in each front door pocket. The centre console bin is massive, too.

Backseat riders will find their surroundings fairly sparse, though there's ample head and leg room. There are two cup holders hidden in a pull down divider, and that's about it. There are also two ISOFIX attachment points, one in each window seat.

Does it represent good value for the price? What features does it come with?  7/10

While the LS can be had with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) and seven seats for $30,500, or even with a bigger engine and all-wheel drive (AWD) for $33,500, the cheapest option is a simple five seat, front-wheel drive (FWD) affair in which you'll be changing gears yourself.

It might not offer the most sleek and modern design, but neither does the LS look like an entry-level model from the outside.

But thanks to a 2017 refresh, the bargain-basement Outlander still offers up plenty of kit for your cash. Expect a 7.0-inch touchscreen that's Apple CarPlay and Android Auto-equipped that will pipe that Spotify playlist through six (albeit fairly ordinary) speakers. Cloth seats are expected, of course, but niceties like dual-zone climate control, cruise control, power windows and keyless entry also make an appearance.

What are the key stats for the engine and transmission?  7/10

The cheapest way into an Outlander is via a 2.0-litre petrol engine good for 110kW at 6000rpm and 190Nm from 4200rpm. It's paired with a spongey five-speed manual gearbox, and sends its power exclusively to the front wheels.

How much fuel does it consume?  7/10

The Outlander's 2.0-litre petrol engine's fuel consumption is pegged at a claimed (combined cycle) 7.0L/100km. Its 63 litre tank will take cheaper 91RON fuel, too.

What's it like to drive?  6/10

If manual gearboxes are all but dead across Australia's new car market, they've been long buried in the mid-size SUV segment. Sure, hardcore off-roading types will still opt to self shift in their toughest of trucks, but there's little point having a third pedal in a FWD urban warrior.

But we're convinced the manual is the only way to squeeze any meaningful performance out of the Outlander's 2.0-litre engine, and that means its a must for us. Force it to hold gear and you'll find the engine is angry enough, but in-gear acceleration is lacking. All-in-all, the engine lacks the across-the-board poke required to really haul the 1985kg Mitsubishi along.

The biggest and most important improvement is the in-cabin technology, with the 7.0-inch touchscreen loaded with features.

The steering is something of a disappointment, too, with a strange and artificial dead weight on-centre feel, and not a lot in the way of communication with the driver. But the suspension is comfortable, absorbing pockmarks and imperfections, and road noise is commendably banished from the cabin.

The gearbox, while anything but surgical, is plenty forgiving, but the clutch feels a touch heavy after a lot of use, and it's tedious in heavy traffic.

But the biggest and most important improvement is the in-cabin technology, with the 7.0-inch touchscreen loaded with features. Vision is good too, and the Outlander's comparatively diminutive dimensions make negotiating the CBD easy.

Warranty & Safety Rating

Basic Warranty

5 years / 130,000 km warranty

ANCAP Safety Rating

ANCAP logo

What safety equipment is fitted? What safety rating?  7/10

The Outlander range was crash tested in 2014 and was awarded the maximum five-star ANCAP rating. Expect seven airbags (dual front, side and curtain airbags, as well as a driver's knee airbag), along with a reversing camera and rear parking sensors.

Unfortunately, you do have to spring for the LS Safety Pack model ($32,000) to unlock critical safety gear like AEB, active cruise control and lane departure warning system.

What does it cost to own? What warranty is offered?  8/10

Like all Outlanders, the LS is covered by Mitsubishi's five-year/100,000km warranty and will require a trip to the service centre every 12 months or 15,000km.

It also arrives with four years complimentary roadside assistance and three years capped price servicing, with service and maintenance costs published on Mitsubishi's Australian website.

Pricing Guides

$24,977
Based on 997 cars listed for sale in the last 6 months
Lowest Price
$17,990
Highest Price
$42,990

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
Aspire PHEV Hybrid 2.0L, Hyb/ULP, 1 SP AUTO $31,020 – 37,400 2017 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER 2017 Aspire PHEV Hybrid Pricing and Specs
ES 5 SEAT (2WD) 2.0L, ULP, 5 SP MAN $19,250 – 24,310 2017 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER 2017 ES 5 SEAT (2WD) Pricing and Specs
ES 5 SEAT (AWD) 2.4L, ULP, CVT AUTO $23,888 – 30,990 2017 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER 2017 ES 5 SEAT (AWD) Pricing and Specs
ES 7 SEAT (2WD) 2.4L, ULP, CVT AUTO $20,805 – 31,290 2017 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER 2017 ES 7 SEAT (2WD) Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
7.1
Design7
Practicality8
Price and features7
Engine & trans7
Fuel consumption7
Driving6
Safety7
Ownership8

“Cheap, but admittedly (mostly) cheerful, the LS does offer considerable bang for your bucks. Not as cutting edge as some of its more recently updated rivals, but it's easy to drive, offers plenty of space and, thanks to a technology update, feels about up to date.”

Would the LS 2WD 2.0 Manual be your pick of the Outlander range? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

Andrew Chesterton
Contributing journalist

Share

Pricing Guide

$19,250

Lowest price, based on third party pricing data

View cars for sale