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If you need a family friendly seven-seat SUV, there are a fair few options available for you to choose from.

You could go for a hardcore off-road capable thing, one that you will likely never actually explore the true capabilities of. Or you could consider a mid-sized five-plus-two SUV, one that has a lower price but compromised space in the back. Or you could just choose a people-mover. #LOL #nothanks #amiright?

Sorry.

Back on topic: here we have three options from big-name brands that represent some of our top picks in the class - the Toyota KlugerMazda CX-9 and Kia Sorento. They also sell in big numbers every single month. 

Specifically our trio consists of the sales-topping Toyota Kluger, the popular Mazda CX-9, and the impressive Kia Sorento. All of these models have a number of variants available, but we’ve kept our three to a strict price point of less than $45,000.

  • The Mazda’s smoky-finish 18-inch wheels are attractive but a bit understated. (image credit: Thomas White) The Mazda’s smoky-finish 18-inch wheels are attractive but a bit understated. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Toyota’s chunky 18s look muscular and aggressive. (image credit: Thomas White) The Toyota’s chunky 18s look muscular and aggressive. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia gets smaller 17-inch wheels, which look dull. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia gets smaller 17-inch wheels, which look dull. (image credit: Thomas White)

Yep, you really can get a family sized seven-seat SUV from one of these three reputable brands for that little, but you do have to sacrifice a few things, including any pretence of serious off-roading. All three of these models are front-wheel drivepetrol powered, and automatic

Our trio is the silver Toyota Kluger GX FWD (priced at $43,550 plus on-road costs), the white Mazda CX-9 Sport FWD (priced at $43,890 plus on-road costs), and the grey Kia Sorento Si FWD (priced at $42,990 plus on-road costs).

Obviously, value for money is a vital consideration in this test, but so, too, will be practicalitysafetycomfortownership and, of course, which of them is the best to drive.

Design

This is where the Mazda might gain plenty of ground - depending on your take on things. 

From most angles the CX-9 is eye-catching – sure, the headlights are small, the grille is huge, and the tail-lights don’t really look proportionate either… but that could have a lot to do with the sheer size of the Mazda. It is a big, intimidating thing on the road, although thankfully it doesn't feel that way to drive. 

The Toyota is ageing well; having launched way back in 2014, the boxy shape is standing up to the test of time, and the recent update saw some worthwhile revisions to its exterior design. I think it looks the most cohesive, and the most family oriented, of the three.

  • From most angles the CX-9 is eye-catching. (image credit: Thomas White) From most angles the CX-9 is eye-catching. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The headlights are small, the grille is huge, and the tail-lights don’t really look proportionate either, though that's probably due to the size of the Mazda. (image credit: Thomas White) The headlights are small, the grille is huge, and the tail-lights don’t really look proportionate either, though that's probably due to the size of the Mazda. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • It is a big, intimidating thing on the road, although thankfully it doesn't feel that way to drive. (image credit: Thomas White) It is a big, intimidating thing on the road, although thankfully it doesn't feel that way to drive. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • Kia’s Sorento facelift for 2018 didn’t necessarily make it any better to look at. (image credit: Thomas White) Kia’s Sorento facelift for 2018 didn’t necessarily make it any better to look at. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Sorento was pretty handsome before its 2018 facelift, thankfully. (image credit: Thomas White) The Sorento was pretty handsome before its 2018 facelift, thankfully. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • Bigger wheels and more bling will always help your car stand out in traffic, but despite lacking some wow-factor, the Kia is still handsome. (image credit: Thomas White) Bigger wheels and more bling will always help your car stand out in traffic, but despite lacking some wow-factor, the Kia is still handsome. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Toyota is ageing well, having launched way back in 2014. (image credit: Thomas White) The Toyota is ageing well, having launched way back in 2014. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The boxy shape is standing up to the test of time, and the recent update saw some worthwhile revisions to its exterior design. (image credit: Thomas White) The boxy shape is standing up to the test of time, and the recent update saw some worthwhile revisions to its exterior design. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kluger arguably looks the most cohesive and family oriented, of the three. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kluger arguably looks the most cohesive and family oriented, of the three. (image credit: Thomas White)

Kia’s Sorento facelift for 2018 didn’t necessarily make it any better to look at, but thankfully it was pretty handsome to begin with. Some people don’t like the design of the new steering wheel inside, but it’s better to hold than the Toyota’s. 

Of course, all of these models are the entry-grade versions, and they don’t necessarily tell the best story for each of their respective model lines. Bigger wheels and more bling will always help your car stand out in traffic, but as far as overall styling goes, there are no real failures here.

I think there’s a bit to be said on wheel choice here, however: the Mazda’s smoky-finish 18-inch wheels are attractive but a bit understated; the Toyota’s chunky 18s look muscular and aggressive; and the Kia’s 17s are dull. 

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:878

Practicality

All three of these are big SUVs,– but there’s a massive difference in exterior dimensions. Note: things are about to get geeky for a few paragraphs.

The Mazda is, it has to be said, huge. It measures 5075mm long (on a 2930mm wheelbase), 1969mm wide and 1747mm tall. 

That makes it considerably bigger than the Kia, which is just 4800mm long (on a 2780mm wheelbase), 1890mm wide and 1690mm tall. It’s the city-friendly option, that’s for sure. The Toyota splits the difference, measuring 4890mm long (with a 2790mm wheelbase), 1925mm wide and 1730mm tall. 

None of them offer the dimensions - internal or external - of the Nissan Pathfinder, which has a massive cabin area but is also a bit of a barge on the road. By the same token, all three are larger inside than the Hyundai Santa Fe, which is a great all-rounder with plenty of good features but is a little tighter in the third-row than its rivals and lacks third-row airbag protection.

What does all that mean in terms of cabin space? 

The Mazda is the roomiest of these three vehicles for adults and kids alike, with easily enough space to squeeze five fully grown bodies on board. It is worth mentioning that the Mazda is the only one of these three with a large transmission tunnel intrusion in the middle of the second row, but the CX-9’s big shortcoming is a lack of third-row air vents - not ideal on a hot day.

  • Storage in the CX-9 isn’t as good up front, but it looks the smartest. (image credit: Thomas White) Storage in the CX-9 isn’t as good up front, but it looks the smartest. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia offers strong storage up front, including a good-sized bin in front of the gear shifter. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia offers strong storage up front, including a good-sized bin in front of the gear shifter. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Toyota feels the most functional up front. (image credit: Thomas White) The Toyota feels the most functional up front. (image credit: Thomas White)

Next best is the Kia, which is just a touch tighter in the back than the Mazda, which is understandable, because physically it’s so much smaller.

The Toyota has the biggest door apertures of these three, and a good platform for your feet that helps make it simpler to scramble into the back row. But once you’re in there, the knee and toe room is pretty poor, despite reasonable headroom and good visibility (the boxier shape and bigger windows in the third-row are welcome). 

If we consider the stated boot capacity of each of these seven-seat SUVs, the Mazda is the decisive victor. The CX-9 has a claimed boot size of 810 litres (all boot measurements are using the VDA method) with five seats up, and that drops to 230L with seven seats in play. But you will need to watch your head on the boot door if you’re tall; the curvaceous design could cause a headache, literally.

The Kia – again, despite its dimensions – manages to be second-best for claimed capacity, with a boot space of 605L with five seats up and 142L with seven in place.

On paper, the Toyota is the worst with five seats in place (529L) but ranks in the middle when it comes to seven-seats-up space (195L). In reality, you’re going to struggle to fit, say, a pram/stroller in the boot if you’re using all three rows, and the usable space is limited in each case. Buy one of those roof pods if you need more room… or, seriously this time, consider a people-mover like the pragmatic Kia Carnival!

  • The Mazda is the roomiest of these three vehicles for adults and kids alike. (image credit: Thomas White) The Mazda is the roomiest of these three vehicles for adults and kids alike. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Mazda is the only one with a transmission tunnel intrusion in the middle of the second row. (image credit: Thomas White) The Mazda is the only one with a transmission tunnel intrusion in the middle of the second row. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The CX-9’s biggest shortcoming is a lack of third-row air vents - not ideal on a hot day. (image credit: Thomas White) The CX-9’s biggest shortcoming is a lack of third-row air vents - not ideal on a hot day. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia Sorento is the next best. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia Sorento is the next best. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia is just a touch tighter in the back when compared to the Mazda. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia is just a touch tighter in the back when compared to the Mazda. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The smaller space in the Kia is understandable, due to the car's physically smaller size. (image credit: Thomas White) The smaller space in the Kia is understandable, due to the car's physically smaller size. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Toyota has the biggest door apertures of these three. (image credit: Thomas White) The Toyota has the biggest door apertures of these three. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • There's a good platform for your feet to make it easier to scramble in the back. (image credit: Thomas White) There's a good platform for your feet to make it easier to scramble in the back. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • Once you’re in there, the knee and toe room is pretty poor. (image credit: Thomas White) Once you’re in there, the knee and toe room is pretty poor. (image credit: Thomas White)

As for child-seat anchor points, the Toyota and Kia both have options for the second-row only, with three top-tether and two ISOFIX anchors. The Mazda adds third-row seating options, with an additional two top-tether points (five in total).

The Toyota smashes its competition for cupholder storage, likely because it’s the only US-built car here: it has 12 cup/bottle caddies across its three rows, where the Kia and Mazda have a few less each.

The Toyota feels the most functional up front, with a very handy shelf that runs across the dashboard and includes a clever little port-hole for your phone cables to be stuck through. It also has a massive centre console, but doesn’t have dual-zone climate control - the other two do.

The thing that doesn’t do the Toyota any favours in this company is its fiddly 6.1-inch touchscreen (which doesn’t look that big) media system. It has Bluetooth phone and audio streaming that connects and reconnects reasonably easily (so long as you’re not attempting to initiate a connection at speed) but the menus on-screen can be hard to decipher, and the buttons at the edge make the monitor look even smaller than it is. 

The Mazda has a better media system with a very handy rotary dial controller and volume knob between the front seats – the two of which combine to offer a much more intuitive user experience at speed.

  • The CX-9 has a claimed boot size of 810 litres with five seats up, and that drops to 230L with seven seats in play. (image credit: Thomas White) The CX-9 has a claimed boot size of 810 litres with five seats up, and that drops to 230L with seven seats in play. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Mazda is huge, measuring in at 5075mm long (on a 2930mm wheelbase), 1969mm wide and 1747mm tall. (image credit: Thomas White) The Mazda is huge, measuring in at 5075mm long (on a 2930mm wheelbase), 1969mm wide and 1747mm tall. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • Toyota is the worst with five seats in place (529L) but ranks in the middle when it comes to seven-seats-up space (195L).  (image credit: Thomas White) Toyota is the worst with five seats in place (529L) but ranks in the middle when it comes to seven-seats-up space (195L). (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Toyota is 4890mm long (with a 2790mm wheelbase), 1925mm wide and 1730mm tall. (image credit: Thomas White) The Toyota is 4890mm long (with a 2790mm wheelbase), 1925mm wide and 1730mm tall. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia manages to be second-best for claimed capacity, with a boot space of 605L with five seats up and 142L with seven in place. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia manages to be second-best for claimed capacity, with a boot space of 605L with five seats up and 142L with seven in place. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia comes in at 4800mm long (on a 2780mm wheelbase), 1890mm wide and 1690mm tall. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia comes in at 4800mm long (on a 2780mm wheelbase), 1890mm wide and 1690mm tall. (image credit: Thomas White)

Still, its screen isn’t overly special – with a 7.0-inch monitor, it is the midpoint here, and not as impressive as other models in the CX-9 range, which have larger displays – and we noticed the MZD Connect system can be slow to load and glitchy with its Bluetooth phone connections (specifically with an iPhone) at times.

Storage in the CX-9 isn’t as good up front as the other two models here, but it looks smarter and more high-end than both of its competitors.

The Kia’s media screen is bigger than the other two - an 8.0-inch unit - and it betters them both with Apple Carplay and Android Auto. It is a reasonably easy system to get used to, but I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how to disable the speed-camera warnings… that could be a blessing in disguise for some, I guess.

The Kia offers strong storage up front, including a good-sized bin in front of the gear-shifter and a decent centre console. And its cabin finishes are smart and stylish – the wraparound section that spans from the front doors all the way around the dashboard in an Audi/Jaguar-esque way is particularly pretty. It would be even better if it stood out more amongst the mass of black plastics on the Si show.

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:887

Price and features

It’s hard to argue with the starting prices for each of these models. That’s exactly what each is - the springboard into the model ranges of these largeseven-seat SUVs. If you want to, and the budget permits, there are variants up to and in excess of $60k for all three models here. 

Because all three are so close on price - less than a grand separates them - let’s first consider what each car has in common, then check if one is better specced than its competitors.

The Toyota misses out on a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift-knob, which the other two are equipped with, and its rivals both have heated folding side mirrors, which the Kluger doesn’t. 

The Kia is the only one with smartphone mirroring tech (Apple CarPlay/Android Auto). Both it and the Mazda have sat nav and digital radio reception, plus dual USB ports. The Toyota misses out on nav and DAB, and has just one USB.

The Mazda runs LED headlights, but misses out on the front fog-lights that its halogen-headlamp-equipped competitors have. (image credit: Tom White) The Mazda runs LED headlights, but misses out on the front fog-lights that its halogen-headlamp-equipped competitors have. (image credit: Tom White)

The Toyota also misses out on proper climate control (manual adjustment with a fan/temp controller in the second row that seemingly didn’t make much difference on test), while the Kia has a dual-zone setup (with a fan controller in the third row) and the Mazda has a three-zone system (but no third-row vents, which seems odd).

The Mazda runs LED headlights, but misses out on the front fog-lights that both of its halogen-headlamp-equipped competitors have. 

The CX-9 and the Toyota both sit atop 18-inch wheels, while the Kia has 17s. The Mazda is the only one that has a space-saver spare – the others have full-size alloy spares – but the Kia is the only one with tyre-pressure monitoring. 

The Mazda has an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, and push-button start – both nice touches that the others lack. And if the old-fashioned key-in-the-barrel starting procedure isn’t cough-worthy enough, Toyota doesn’t even offer an illuminated ring around the barrel, meaning you will fumble your key into the slot in dark spaces.

If the Kluger has one redeeming spec feature, it’s that Toyota has nine colour options, while the others only offer six choices.

See below for safety inclusions and, crucially, exclusions…

Mazda CX-9 pricing and spec

Kia Sorento pricing and spec

Toyota Kluger pricing and spec 

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:996

Engine and transmission

There are two different takes on petrol propulsion here. The CX-9 has a downsized turbocharged engine, where the others have larger capacity, non-turbocharged V6 engines.

The Mazda uses a 2.5-litre four-cylinder turbo petrol that pushes out 170kW of power and a huge 420Nm of torque. The engine is teamed to a six-speed automatic, and can be had in front or all-wheel drive.

The Kia is powered by a 3.5-litre V6 petrol with 206kW of power and 336Nm of torque. The model was updated for 2018 with a new engine mated to a new transmission - an eight-speed auto, with front-wheel drive only. The brilliant 2.2-litre turbo diesel drivetrain in the Sorento range offers the added assuredness of AWD, and neither of its compatriots here can boast the offer of diesel power, either.

  • The Mazda has a turbocharged four-cylinder with the least power of these three, at 170kW, but the most torque - 420Nm. (image credit: Thomas White) The Mazda has a turbocharged four-cylinder with the least power of these three, at 170kW, but the most torque - 420Nm. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia is powered by a 3.5-litre V6 petrol with 206kW of power and 336Nm of torque. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia is powered by a 3.5-litre V6 petrol with 206kW of power and 336Nm of torque. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Toyota has the most power, with 218kW, and decent torque (350Nm). (image credit: Thomas White) The Toyota has the most power, with 218kW, and decent torque (350Nm). (image credit: Thomas White)

The Toyota also uses a 3.5-litre V6 petrol, but outguns the others for outright power with 218kW, while torque is rated at 350Nm. Toyota’s 2017 update for the Kluger also saw it adopt an eight-speed automatic, and you can have front or all-wheel drive.

None of these cars have paddle-shifters, but each has a drive mode that will alter the transmission to make it feel sportier. The Kia, though, has a few different drive modes that also effect the steering.

All three can tow up to 2000kg with a braked trailer, and the Toyota can handle 700kg without brakes while the Mazda and Kia can do 750kg.

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:888

Fuel consumption

The claimed fuel use gap between these three is quite large. The smaller turbo engine of the Mazda is claimed to use a fair bit less on paper. The claimed consumption for it is 8.4 litres per 100 kilometres, well and truly less than the Toyota, which claims 9.1L/100km, and the Kia, at a rounded-off 10.0L/100km.

In the real world, we saw numbers a little closer than that. In fact, the Kia was impressively frugal on our highway test, bettering both of its rivals, while around town it paid a slight price. The Toyota was fairly thirsty in town, too, but so was the Mazda. And it was line ball between those two out on the open road.

The numbers we ended up with saw the Kia take a surprise win, with an accumulated score of 10.4L/100km via the trip computer. The Mazda was just a tenth of a litre thirstier overall, averaging 10.5L/100km. The Toyota wasn’t far off the pace, at 11.1L/100km. 

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:887

Driving

We've got three big SUVs here, all with very different driving characters. 

The Mazda – as you may expect of the ‘Zoom Zoom’ brand – has a more driver-focused tune to its steering and suspension. The steering at higher speeds is direct and nicely weighted, but at low speeds it can be heavy and a little slow, by comparison.

Its suspension, too, is aimed at control at the slight expense of comfort – the ride is a little firmer over sharp edges than its rivals, but it will out-handle both of them in a series of twisting corners. It’s a shame Mazda fits the FWD models with rubbish Yokohama Geolandar rubber, which doesn’t allow you to exploit the chassis as much as you could.

The CX-9’s turbo engine’s extra torque is certainly advantageous in a lot of ways. It feels less stressed to drive than either of the V6 engines, particularly at lower speeds – the turbo takes a lot of hassle out of things, pulling you and your family away from the lights quickly, with its snappy but not clumsy six-speed auto getting the gear choice right almost every time. In the V6s you might feel like you’re wringing their necks, where the turbo whooshes away with less fuss, using the low- to mid-rev range sweetspot readily. 

If you’re buying a seven-seater as more than just an appliance, it is the pick. We’d get rid of those tyres, though…

The front-wheel drive Kluger isn’t as assuring to drive as the all-wheel drive version, because its front tyres can squeal really easily, and you’ll notice the steering wheel tugging to the side in your hands under acceleration (that’s called torque steer, and the Kluger suffers it worse than the other vehicles here).

  • In the V6s you might feel like you’re wringing their necks, where the turbo CX-9 whooshes away with less fuss, using the low- to mid-rev range sweetspot readily. (image credit: Thomas White) In the V6s you might feel like you’re wringing their necks, where the turbo CX-9 whooshes away with less fuss, using the low- to mid-rev range sweetspot readily. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kia’s suspension offers the best combination of ride comfort and body control, dealing with bad surfaces and big bumps very well. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kia’s suspension offers the best combination of ride comfort and body control, dealing with bad surfaces and big bumps very well. (image credit: Thomas White)
  • The Kluger’s ride isn’t as comfortable as the Mazda – in fact, below 50km/h it can be downright annoying. (image credit: Thomas White) The Kluger’s ride isn’t as comfortable as the Mazda – in fact, below 50km/h it can be downright annoying. (image credit: Thomas White)

On the plus side, the steering is very light at urban speeds, making reverse-parallel moves and multi-storey car parks simple.  

Its V6 engine is punchy and likes to rev, but the eight-speed auto can be caught out when you’re on and off the throttle. It isn’t such an issue at higher speeds, but around town it can be a little confused.

The Kluger’s ride isn’t as comfortable as the Mazda – in fact, below 50km/h it can be downright annoying. The suspension just doesn’t settle very well over bumpy surfaces, but it is reasonably composed on the highway. The Kluger exhibited more road and wind noise than its competitors, too (yes, the Mazda is quieter).

The Sorento nails the brief for road manners, which is no surprise, given the brand has invested heavily in making sure that its suspension and steering systems are tailored to suit Australian conditions.

The steering is light but accurate, and very nicely weighted at high and low speeds. The Kia’s suspension offers the best combination of ride comfort and body control, dealing with bad surfaces and big bumps very well. But, like the Mazda, it was let down by pretty hopeless rubber – the Nexen N Priz tyres under its arches were the worst on test, scrubbing out in corners more than its competitors, and squealing under throttle at times, too.

While the engine isn’t as potent as either of its rivals on paper, it offers impressive smoothness and is actually really rapid under hard acceleration.

The Kia mightn’t excite as much as the Mazda, but for this test, and the intended buyer, it is a fantastically well executed thing.

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:796

Safety

Each of these family focused SUVs has the maximum five-star ANCAP crash test score: the Toyota scored that number in 2014, the Mazda in 2016 and the Kia in 2017.

Each has a reversing camera and rear parking sensors, while the Kia adds front parking sensors. Each has curtain airbag protection for all three rows, plus dual front and front-side airbags, while the Toyota adds a driver’s knee airbag.

It’s in the safety technology section that the Toyota really falls behind its rivals. There’s no auto emergency braking (AEB) or lane-departure warning - and yet you get that safety stuff in the Mazda and the Kia. In fact, the Mazda adds blind-spot monitoring and rear-cross traffic alert, too. 

The disappointing part is that Toyota asks you to spend more than sixty grand on the top-spec Kluger to get AEB - and for a family car in this day and age, that’s just not right.

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:986

Ownership

A resounding smackdown from Kia here. It has a seven-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty program, which also includes roadside assist for that same period if you maintain your car at a Kia workshop.

The servicing plan for the Sorento is terrific, too, with maintenance due every 12 months or 15,000km, and capped-price servicing for seven years/105,000km. To keep things simple against its rivals, we calculated the annual costs over three years, and it worked out the cheapest at $333/yr.

The Mazda requires services every 12 months/10,000km, with the average annual cost over three years averaging out at $343. It can’t match the Kia for warranty, either: it runs three years/unlimited kilometres.

While people typically think Toyota and affordable ownership are synonymous, the fact is that the Kluger is the dearest of these three based on a three-year run, because it needs maintenance every six months or 10,000km, at $180 per visit. The average annual cost, then, is $360. And it has the least impressive warranty plan – three years/100,000km. 

Further to all that, you have to pay extra for Mazda and Toyota roadside assist. See? Told you the Kia delivered a smackdown.

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Score:797

Verdict

It is extremely hard to ignore the excellent ownership program that Kia offers its buyers – so hard, in fact, that it takes the win in this comparison test… but only just.

The Sorento is an impressive vehicle in a lot of regards, with terrific road manners and a willing and refined drivetrain. And while the Sorento is the smallest on the outside, there’s bugger-all in it in terms of cabin space between the three. The fact you can get it with a diesel engine, should your budget allow, just puts a cherry on top.

The Mazda runs a very, very close second here. Its cabin is beautiful, it has a lengthy standard equipment list, and a solid drivetrain. It isn’t quite as supple as the Kia to drive, but that might be right up your alley.

In a distant third place is the Toyota Kluger. We understand why so many people buy them, but it’s clear from our testing that there are better options out there. It isn’t as roomy in the back, nor is it quite as good to drive. And the lack of safety kit for those who can only afford to stretch this far is a bit of a kick in the guts.

 Mazda CX-9 SportKia Sorento SiToyota Kluger GX
Final Score:8.08.26.9

Which of these three would best suit your needs? Let us know in the comments section below.



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