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Mitsubishi 3000GT
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Mitsubishi 3000GT Pricing and Specs

1998 price from
$11,600*

The Mitsubishi 3000GT is available from $11,600 to $17,050 for the 1998 Hatchback across a range of models.

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Year Price From Price To
1998 $11,600 $17,050
1997 $11,600 $17,050
1996 $11,600 $17,050
1995 $11,000 $16,170
1994 $10,700 $15,730
1993 $10,700 $15,730
1992 $10,700 $15,730

Mitsubishi 3000GT FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Mitsubishi here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • I wanted to get your advice on an older cheap car for around $5-7K. Do you have any recommendations?

    It’s a bit hard to go past an older Holden Commodore or Ford Falcon for this brief. That said, your towing requirement means you’d be best looking at something like an AU (1998 to 2003) Falcon Ute (assuming you only need to move one other person).

    These are strong, simple cars that any mechanic can deal with and parts are plentiful and relatively cheap. There are other options (older Japanese dual-cabs) but nothing really gets close to the Aussie stuff for durability and running costs. An elderly Nissan Navara, for instance, might do the job but is likely to become fragile as it ages. A two-wheel-drive Toyota HiLux is another possibility, but you’d probably be right at the limit of your towing capacity with one of those. The Falcon ute, meanwhile, can legally tow 2300kg. It’s not glamorous or sexy, but it’ll do the job and stay on target price-wise.

    The other obvious contender would be an early Mitsubishi Pajero with a V6 engine. These had a towing capacity of 2500kg and are around now for very little money, certainly within your budget. They also double as a very handy off-roader should you wish.

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  • What van should I get to build a camper van?

    Mitsubishi’s L300 Express was available as a four-wheel-drive model way back in the 1980s (83 to 86) and was a very popular van to convert for camping thanks to that all-wheel-drive grip that allowed it to tackle rough roads with little problem. After 1986, a few of the later model Express 4WD vans (often badged Delica) made it into Australia as private imports, and there are a few of them around now to choose from.

    The requirement to be able to stand up inside the vehicle will limit your choices a little, but popular vans like the Toyota HiAce, Ford Transit and Mercedes-Benz Vito were available in a high-roof configuration. Even though they lacked all-wheel-drive, generally rugged construction means they should cope with dirt roads pretty well. They just won’t have the grip for off-road work.

    As with any second-hand commercial vehicle, try to find out what it did in its previous life. A van that has been used for hard labour might well be worn out. And don’t forget, nobody bought these things new for anything other than a working life.

    If, on the other hand, you’re shipping for a brand-new van, there are plenty of options from Ford, Mercedes, Peugeot, Fiat, Toyota and more. The vast majority of them use a turbo-diesel engine so will be quite economical and many also offer an automatic transmission for ease of driving. Choose the one that suits your intended layout best in terms of side and rear doors and the ability to climb from the front seat into the van area without leaving the vehicle (some have cargo barriers that will prevent this).

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  • I have a Mitsubishi Pajero GLX-R. The vehicle is running well except when tank reaches 1/4 full...

    Perhaps the clue here is that the problem only occurs when the fuel level reaches one-quarter or less. That suggests that there’s a problem with the fuel pick-up in the bottom section of the tank. Typically, this will involve a split in the fuel pick-up line.

    When the tank is full of fuel, fuel covers the split, allowing the pump to pick up fuel normally. As the level falls, the split is exposed and suddenly the pump is sucking air instead of fuel.

    Alternatively, your problem could be bleed-back of the fuel pressure when the car is parked, but that would potentially affect things regardless of how much fuel was in the tank at the time. Unless the bleed-back is being caused by the split we’re talking about, in which case you’re back to square one. Either way, it would be wise to check pump pressure and delivery rate (litres per minute) to see that the pump itself is working properly and at correct capacity. Don’t rule out something like a blocked fuel filter, either, which can seriously reduce the flow of the fuel to the engine; critical in any cold-start situation.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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