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Rolls-Royce Wraith Eagle VIII 2019 revealed

The limited-edition British luxury car pays an homage to the first non-stop transatlantic flight in June, 1919.

Rolls-Royce has revealed the limited-edition Wraith Eagle VIII ahead of its public display in Lake Como, Italy, this week. 

The high-end special will be shown from 24-26 May at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este car show, however, the British brand has not disclosed pricing or availability details. 

Rolls-Royce built this vehicle in celebration of the first non-stop transatlantic flight in June, 1919 – 100 years ago next month.

Pilots John Alcock and Arthur Brown achieved the feat using a modified First World War Vickers Vimy aircraft, departing from Newfoundland Canada, and landing in Clifden, Ireland.

The new car draws its name from the aforementioned aircraft, which was powered by twin 20.3-litre, 260kW Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII engines.

The dashboard is inlaid with silver and copper to resemble the earth from above at night. The dashboard is inlaid with silver and copper to resemble the earth from above at night.

A plaque on the driver’s door quotes one Sir Winston Churchill, who spoke of the momentous achievement.

“I do not know what we should most admire – their audacity, determination, skill, science, their aeroplane, their Rolls-Royce engines – or their good fortune” it reads.

The Wraith Eagle VIII features special touches nodding to the milestone flight, with Gunmetal two-tone paint separated by bronze detailing, and a black grille that references the engine cowling on the Vickers Vimy aeroplane.

In typical Rolls-Royce fashion, an array of exotic materials are found in the cabin including smoked eucalyptus wood with precious metal inlays, which resemble the view of the earth from above at night.

A bespoke headliner depicts the night sky as it appeared in 1919. A bespoke headliner depicts the night sky as it appeared in 1919.

A large clock on the dashboard features a frozen-look background and glows a faint green in night time driving conditions.

The timepiece is in reference to the transatlantic-conquering aircraft’s instruments, which froze in high altitude and could barely be viewed, with only the green glow from the control panel to light the dials.

Most spectacularly, the vehicle’s headliner is littered with small lights, which specifically depict the celestial arrangement from the time of the flight in 1919.

Furthermore, Rolls-Royce engineers embroided ‘clouds’ in the headliner, and stitched in the aircraft’s flight path along the night sky.

Are you interested in ultra extravagant vehicles like the Rolls-Royce Wraith Eagle VIII, or do you prefer more accessible passenger cars? Tell us in the comments.