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2020 Skoda Kamiq
See our complete guide for the Skoda Kamiq

2020 Skoda Kamiq Pricing and Specs

Price Guide
$36,245*

The Skoda Kamiq 2020 is priced from $29,998 for SUV Kamiq 85TSI.

The Skoda Kamiq 2020 is available in Premium Unleaded Petrol.

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SUV

Skoda Kamiq Models SPECS PRICE
110TSI Limited Edition 1.5LPremium Unleaded Petrol7 speed automatic $26,400 – 34,980
110TSI Monte Carlo 1.5LPremium Unleaded Petrol7 speed automatic $25,400 – 33,660
85TSI 1.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol7 speed automatic $20,300 – 27,610
85TSI 1.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol6 speed manual $19,100 – 26,620

Skoda Kamiq 2020 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Skoda here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Is the Skoda Karoq transmission reliable?

    First things first; make sure the Karoq is actually as big as you think it is/need it to be. The reality is that this is not a huge SUV and is really comparable with something like, say, the Mazda CX-30, while cars like the Mazda CX-5, Hyundai Tucson and Kia Sportage are all a size bigger.

    Beyond that, the good news is that the car’s most problematic element, a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission has now been replaced on the 110 version with an eight-speed automatic with a conventional torque converter. And although the 1.4-litre capacity will ring alarm bells for those who remember the troublesome Twin-charger engine with the same capacity fitted to many VW and Skoda products, the unit in the new Karoq is less complex and doesn’t seem to suffer the same problems.

    However, there are no blanket statements on this subject and your experience with your current Astra is proof. Given that many owners were appalled at the reliability of their Astras, you seem to have scored a good one. And the reverse can apply; sometime a car with even a great reliability record can throw up problems for a particular owner. Modern cars are incredibly complex machines and things can (and do) go wrong on a fairly random basis.

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  • Are the engine internals the same in the 2.0-litre turbos from Audi, VW and Skoda?

    You’re right, there’s a lot of commonality between the various engines from Skoda, VW and Audi. There are many examples of engines from these brands that all use the same basic bottom-end (crankshaft and pistons) architecture. And yes, in some cases, the main differentiator is the turbo-boost pressure.

    But that doesn’t mean that’s the only difference; differing boost levels require different engine management, so the electronic control of the various engines can be very different. There can also be hardware differences such as the actual turbocharger unit and fuel injectors. That’s why it’s not quite as simple as raising boost pressure to arrive at a higher output. Revising engine management to do this requires somebody who really knows what they’re doing. Even then, a moderately powered version of an engine might not have the oil-cooling or strengthened internals of what appears to be the same engine with a higher output.

    The VW-Audi group is not the only manufacturer to take this approach, of course, and many other car-makers use the same strategy of producing a variety of different engine tunes from the one basic unit. It’s a great way of differentiating models within a range and, of course, saving money in terms of research and development.

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  • How to reduce the fuel consumption in my Skoda Superb Scout?

    While I’ll admit that an average fuel consumption figure of 12.4 litres per 100km is high for your car, there are a few things to consider here. By driving just seven kilometres each way to work and back, you’re probably running for half your driving time with an engine that is still warming up. Cold engines use a richer mixture and that means more fuel. Cold starts are a real problem for fuel consumption, and you appear to be driving on a cold engine for a high percentage of your daily run.

    The other consideration is your average speed. You say that there’s no stop-start traffic conditions, but if you drive at urban speeds all the way to work, then you need to be looking at the official urban fuel consumption number which is 9.0 litres per 100km (the 7.3 litres figure you’ve quoted is for a mix of urban and highway running).

    Even so, 9 litres per 100km is a lot less than 12.4 litres, so maybe there is something going on. Despite your reservations about Skoda’s politics, the best thing to do is to have the car electronically interrogated to see what, if any, fault codes appear. Only then can you really know what’s going on. Are you using the recommended 95-RON fuel? The wrong octane rating (RON) can have an effect on fuel consumption, as can a heavy right foot.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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