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2013 Honda Jazz
EXPERT RATING
6.5
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Honda Jazz

2013 Honda Jazz Pricing and Specs

Price Guide
$13,990*

The Honda Jazz 2013 prices range from $7,999 for the basic trim level Hatchback Jazz Vibe to $16,995 for the top of the range Hatchback Jazz Vibe-S.

The Honda Jazz 2013 is available in Regular Unleaded Petrol and Hybrid with Regular Unleaded. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the Hatchback 1.3L 5 SP Manual to the Hatchback 1.5L 5 SP Automatic.

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Hatchback

Honda Jazz Models SPECS PRICE
GLi 1.3LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed automatic $6,500 – 10,120
GLi 1.3LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $5,800 – 8,910
Hybrid 1.3LHybrid with Regular UnleadedCVT auto $6,900 – 10,670
Vibe 1.3LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed automatic $7,000 – 10,780
Vibe 1.3LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $5,700 – 8,800
Vibe-S 1.5LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed automatic $7,400 – 11,440
VTi 1.5LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed automatic $6,000 – 9,240
VTi 1.5LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed manual $5,300 – 8,250
VTi-S 1.5LRegular Unleaded Petrol5 speed automatic $6,900 – 10,670

Honda Jazz 2013 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Honda Jazz here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Which generation Honda Jazz had a transmission issue related to the CVT?

    The problem you refer to affected the very first Jazz models sold here up to 2008. Any car made after that date should not exhibit the same problem as Honda made running changes to fix it back in the day.

    The problem was actually traced back to the wrong transmission fluid being used in the CVT unit. These modern transmission are very particular about what fluid they use, especially with regard to the complex brew of additives that make up the fluid.

    Over time, the fluid in the affected Jazzes would start to break down as the additives became depleted, at which point, it wasn’t doing the complete job necessary. Specifically, the depleted additive package suddenly allowed the starter-motor clutch to remain engaged. Essentially, you had the transmission trying to drive the car and the starter clutch dragging at it, effectively trying to slow it down. Which is when the car would start to shudder.

    The solution was to switch to a new, reformulated transmission fluid which was added to the drained CVT, the car driven for a certain distance, the new fluid dumped and refilled and then the ECU reset to recalibrate the transmission. Problem sorted.

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  • Honda Jazz 2008: What's the difference between models?

    There’s a bit of detail missing from your question, Peter, but I’ll take a stab in the dark and guess that you’re talking about the Honda Jazz city car. The MY06 Jazz was, in fact, known as the GD model, while the GE you’re comparing it with was released in 2008.

    The GE was an all-new model Jazz, so fundamentally they’re entirely different cars. Yes, they share a similar mechanical specification and share a place in terms of their market segments, but beyond that, the GE is a newer design with better dynamics and superior safety levels.

    If you can afford the later GE model, then it would definitely be a better car.

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  • Toyota Yaris 2011 and Honda Jazz 2005: Engine longevity

    A few factors determine engine longevity, so let’s start with the first of those, the basic materials and design of the engine in question. Both the Toyota and Honda have advanced small-capacity engines that are made from quality materials. So that’s in their favour.

    The second factor is servicing. A lack of regular maintenance including fresh oil and filters will kill engines fast, so that’s crucial. And finally, how they are driven will also play a part. An engine that only does long distances in the country will always last longer than one that is subjected to frequent cold starts and stop-start traffic. An engine that is regularly revved to redline between the gears will also potentially die younger than one that is driven sensibly and with a bit of mechanical sympathy.

    The bottom line? There’s no short answer. But I have seen small-capacity Honda and Toyota engines clock up 250,000km and more with correct maintenance. Things have certainly changed from the 1950s when the average car engine needed a rebuilt every 100,000km and what was called a de-coke and valve-grind every 30,000km. Ask your grandfather about it.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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