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Used Mitsubishi ASX review: 2010-2012

EXPERT RATING
7
Shared components and known mechanicals make a reliable light SUV. New They might all look the same, or at the least similar, but not all SUVs are the same and buyers need to be aware of the differences when shopping for a new wagon. Mitsubishi built the ASX as a light-duty SUV best suited to city commuters who only

Shared components and known mechanicals make a reliable light SUV.

New

They might all look the same, or at the least similar, but not all SUVs are the same and buyers need to be aware of the differences when shopping for a new wagon.

Mitsubishi built the ASX as a light-duty SUV best suited to city commuters who only occasionally venture beyond the city limits.

There was much to like about the ASX. It had a five-star safety rating, attractive styling and versatile cabin and plenty of features.

It shared componentry with other Mitsubishi models, such as the Lancer and Outlander. Mitsubishi launched the ASX with the XA series in 2010.

The base ASX came in front or all-wheel drive, the Platinum was a front-driver and Aspire was AWD.

Most buyers opted for the front-drive, which was available only with a 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine.

No fire-breather, it was competent and competitive with its class rivals.

Those who opted for AWD had the choice of the four-cylinder petrol engine or a 1.8-litre four-cylinder turbo diesel.

On the road the ASX was pleasing to drive

Choosing the latter got you significantly better fuel consumption and better driveability thanks to the diesel’s stronger low-end torque.

ASX buyers overwhelmingly chose the constantly variable transmission option. Anyone who wanted a manual could have a five-speeder with the petrol engine or a six-speed on the diesel.

On the road the ASX was pleasing to drive, with light steering, comfortable ride and decent handling for the class.

Now

Overall, ASX owners are happy with their cars and make few complaints about them.

Most problems identified by the trade relate to ordinary wear and tear, such as brakes and tyres, and are not cause for concern.

The mechanics of the ASX (and the models they are shared with) are well sorted.

The ASX is generally robust and reliable, provided there is regular servicing according to Mitsubishi’s recommendations.

When considering an ASX with the CVT, it’s important to understand that it differs from a regular automatic we’ve grown up with over many decades.

It’s designed to operate within a small engine speed range to deliver the best possible fuel economy, so the engine speed doesn’t vary the way it does with a “normal” auto.

Be sure you will be comfortable with its driving style before you part with your cash.

CVTs are prone to driveability issues that put some people off, so you should thoroughly put the ’box through its paces, checking it at low and high speed, manoeuvring slowly at walking speed, taking off and slowing down, all the while observing for any shuddering, hesitations or confusion about what it’s doing.

Check for a service record to make sure the car you’re about to buy hasn’t been neglected.

There have been several recalls affecting the ASX since its introduction, so make sure those issues have been rectified before committing to buy.

A recall in 2012 related to the connection of the wiring harness to the power steering control unit — the steering could become inoperable.

Another, in 2013, was to check the panoramic roof glass on Aspire models, which could become detached because of failure of the adhesive used to attach it.

Diesel ASXs were recalled in 2013 for an engine fix — soot deposits could cause the piston rings to stick.

In 2014 petrol versions were recalled to rectify a switch sleeve in the brake booster, which could prevent the brake pedal being released and make it impossible to drive the car.

Smithy Says

Not flashy, safer and more sensible.

Owners Say

Barbara Oliver I bought my ASX two years ago when it had 30,000km on it. It now has done 97,000km and apart from changing some light bulbs and tyres I haven’t spent a penny on it. I’m very happy with it.

Terry Edwards I’ve owned my Aspire for five years and it’s been good. It performs well and the fuel economy is good. Overall, I’m satisfied.

Robert Brewster I bought my Aspire 4WD second-hand with 16,000km on the clock. It’s awesome and I love driving it. It pulls my trailer easily, even when fully loaded with camping gear. It’s the best car I’ve ever owned.

John Newton I’ve owned an ASX Aspire diesel for two years. In that time there have been some reliability issues and a couple of recalls. It’s not great to drive.

Pricing

Year Price From Price To
2012 $8,360 $16,940
2011 $7,700 $14,190
2010 $7,040 $12,870

View all Mitsubishi ASX pricing and specifications

Pricing Guides

$10,990
Based on 36 cars listed for sale in the last 6 months
Lowest Price
$8,888
Highest Price
$13,999

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
(2WD) 2.0L, ULP, 5 SP MAN $9,990 – 10,977 2010 Mitsubishi ASX 2010 (2WD) Pricing and Specs
(4WD) 1.8L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $10,990 – 13,488 2010 Mitsubishi ASX 2010 (4WD) Pricing and Specs
Aspire (4WD) 1.8L, Diesel, 6 SP MAN $9,990 – 12,990 2010 Mitsubishi ASX 2010 Aspire (4WD) Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
7
Graham Smith
Contributing Journalist

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