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Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT vs Holden Cruze SRi-V

Mitsubishi Lancer and Holden Cruze go head-to-head.

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT and Holden Cruze SRi-V go head-to-head in this comparative review.

value

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT

from $28,890

A mid-life update adds extra value to the Lancer. It now gets USB connectivity, pollen filter, Bluetooth with audio streaming and front foglights.

Holden Cruze SRi-V

from $30,490

This Aussie-made sedan comes packed with features such as fog lights, rear parking sensors, colour satnav, USB/iPod/MP3 plug and play, 10GB music hard drive, DVD, leather seats, heated front seats, lit vanity mirrors, 12V sockets front and back and Bluetooth. It comes with a fairly standard threeyear/ 100,000km warranty.

design

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT

The ageing Mitsubishi Lancer hatch has stood the test of time. In this update, the VR also gets front corner air dams. Inside, Mitsubishi has yet to address the expanse of hard dashboard plastic but has added soft touch door trims with leather inserts. Our test vehicle was the 30th Anniversary Edition Lancer with extra kit.

Holden Cruze SRi-V

It looks like a small-scale Commodore, which is not a bad thing. Holden has spruced it up with chrome accents and the discreet tailpipe is very neat. Inside, there are more classy chrome touches, but conventional and intuitive controls. It has ample rear legroom for adults and now comes with a footrest for the driver.

technology

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT

The 2.0-litre MIVEC four-cylinder engine has 110kW but engine management tweaks have yielded a vast improvement in fuel economy from 8.3L/100km to 7.3. It also features keyless start, cruise control, steering wheel controls and auto headlights.

Holden Cruze SRi-V

There is some turbo lag off the line, on rolling starts and overtaking manoeuvres but once it spools up, you won't believe it's just a 1.4. It also sips fuel at a miserly 6.9L/100km. The proximity key automatically unlocks the doors. There are steering wheel controls and auto headlights.

safety

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT

Safety has been improved in the update. The VR gets reversing sensors and a reversing camera with the monitor in the rearview mirror, where it belongs.  It comes with a five-star ANCAP crash safety rating and seven airbags.

Holden Cruze SRi-V

The Cruze earns a five-star ANCAP crash safety rating and has six airbags, stability control and ABS. It has rear parking sensors but doesn't have a reversing camera; not that it needs it as the rear visibility is much better than in the Lancer hatch.

driving

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT

There is no turbo lag off the line, just instant power that, unfortunately, tugs at the steering wheel. Otherwise it handles with a neutral feel (torque steer in the wet aside). The cabin is quiet, the accommodation pleasant.

Holden Cruze SRi-V

Drivers will be surprised by the Cruze's nippiness around town despite its small engine. However, it has light and vague steering and the six-speed auto can be a little rough and unpredictable at times.

Verdict

Mitsubishi Lancer VR CVT

Holden Cruze SRi-V

Mitsubishi has updated the Lancer to make it a better value proposition but it's still a little dated. We're happy to say the Aussie-made Cruze is the winner here as a solid, utilitarian car that will please with its high level of equipment and technology.