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Fiat 500
EXPERT RATING
7.1
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Fiat 500

Fiat 500 Pricing and Specs

2022 price from
$19,550*

The Fiat 500 is available from $19,550 to $24,250 for the 2022 Hatchback across a range of models.

The cute-as-a-button Fiat 500 is retro that works. Based heavily on the 1957 original, the 'new' 500 has managed to grow larger and more modern while still staying true to its retro roots. Fun, funky and fashionable, the 500 can be had with a choice of petrol engines that pair with a manual gearbox, or a 'single-clutch' automatic that does take some getting used to. Whether you pick the 500 Lounge or the 500 Dolcevita, it’s a two-door proposition only, so families need not apply. Pricing ranges from $19,550 all the way to $24,250.

It's hard to imagine a more stylish way to navigate the CBD.

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Year Price From Price To
2022 $19,550 $24,250
2021 $14,400 $25,410
2020 $13,500 $24,640
2019 $12,800 $28,380
2018 $11,800 $27,830
2017 $11,100 $26,290
2016 $9,600 $20,350
2015 $9,100 $18,590
2014 $6,800 $17,380
2013 $4,600 $13,970
2012 $3,800 $10,230
2011 $3,900 $9,680
2010 $3,400 $9,350
2009 $2,800 $7,370
2008 $2,500 $6,710
1971 N/A N/A
1970 N/A N/A
1969 N/A N/A
1964 N/A N/A
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1960 N/A N/A

Fiat 500 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Fiat 500 here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Is the Mini Cooper the best small sporty car?

    If she has fallen for the looks of the Mini it's probably game over. But you should still test drive the Fiat 500 for style and the Audi A1 as a driving alternative.

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  • Fiat 500 to downsize

    There is no reason to worry about safety in the Fiat but I'm getting an awful lot of complaints from Fiat-Chrysler owners. I'd steer you towards a Suzuki Swift or a Kia Rio.

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  • Do you know the best way to tighten up the clutch on a 2008 Fiat 500 Ritmo sport?

    The Fiat Ritmo is a pretty rare car here, having been on sale for only about two years and failing to inspire much interest from Australian car buyers.

    As far as the clutch goes (and the Ritmo was only sold here in manual form) I believe it uses a hydraulic actuation. On conventional hydraulic systems, there should be an adjuster somewhere down near the slave-cylinder which varies where it acts on the clutch fork. By altering this setting, you effectively change the distance the fork travels and, therefore, introduce more or less movement into the clutch itself. But the Ritmo uses a concentric slave cylinder which lives inside the bell-housing and is not adjustable nor serviceable without removing the car’s gearbox.

    That would make the Ritmo’s clutch self-adjusting. Either way, when the system has run out of adjustment, that usually signals that it’s time for a new clutch assembly as the clutch itself is worn beyond the point of serviceability.

    But, before you worry about any of that, check that the clutch master cylinder contains the correct level of clutch fluid. If there’s a leak in the system, the clutch will not disengage properly. If your problem is one of the clutch slipping, then it’s more likely you have an actual worn out clutch.

     

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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