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Range Rover 2018 review: Vogue TDV6

EXPERT RATING
7.5
Range Rover's namesake flagship might feel right at home in the off-road rough stuff, but is it too big and bulky for life in the city?

Range Rover. Straight away, you know exactly what I'm talking about. Despite a growing model line-up that now includes the Evoque, Velar and the Range Rover Sport, just about everyone on Earth pictures the brand's big bruiser whenever they hear the name.

A true motoring icon, it might have started life as a posh farmer's tool, but it is now a fixture on suburban driveways everywhere. Big and bold, it's now far more stylish than the utilitarian original, yet still manages to be super-impressive off-road. I know this because I once drove one up a river. Not across, but up. Against the current, in water almost a metre deep.

For 2018, the Range Rover's interior has scored an upgrade and, as ever, a minor tweak in the specifications. But it's still a car that has few genuine rivals.

Land Rover Range Rover 2018: Vogue TDV6
Safety rating
Engine Type3.0L turbo
Fuel TypeDiesel
Fuel Efficiency6.9L/100km
Seating5 seats
Price from$177,990

Is there anything interesting about its design?  8/10

One of the extraordinary things about Land Rover and sister company Jaguar is the sheer consistency of the design teams over the past decade or so. The Range Rover is a hefty machine, and while it looks big, it does not look as overbearing as a car five metres long and over 180cm tall could.

Inside is swathed in leather with wood or, if you prefer, metallic finishes. (image: Peter Anderson) Inside is swathed in leather with wood or, if you prefer, metallic finishes. (image: Peter Anderson)

No, it's not a lithe CX-9 approach, but it maintains the muscular Rangie look with the blacked-out pillars and floating roof and the now-signature laid-back grille and lights. And on our black car, the blacked-out gills on the front doors looked terrific - sometime the lighter-coloured versions look a bit cheap.

Inside is swathed in leather with wood or, if you prefer, metallic finishes. Everything looks and feels substantial. The new 10-inch screen looks a lot more modern than the older version, and it sits atop a redesigned centre console with the new HVAC controls. The old dials on the steering wheel have also been replaced with touch-sensitive dials with digital displays. It's a nice mix of traditional shapes with advanced tech.

The old dials on the steering wheel have also been replaced with touch-sensitive dials with digital displays. (image: Peter Anderson) The old dials on the steering wheel have also been replaced with touch-sensitive dials with digital displays. (image: Peter Anderson)

How practical is the space inside?  9/10

From the get-go, it's huge inside. There is lounging-room aplenty in the first and second rows, and rear seat occupants score their own set of climate controls.

It comes with a full size spare. (image: Peter Anderson) It comes with a full size spare. (image: Peter Anderson)

Storage is everywhere, with two deep bins in the front and two front cupholders that slide away to reveal a space big enough for a beagle (okay, slight exaggeration). The rear also features two cupholders and each door will hold a bottle.

Boot space starts at a massive 639 litres and expands to 1943 litres with the rear seats down. There's a ton of space in the boot for things or a hefty dog.

Boot space starts at a massive 639 litres and expands to 1943 litres with the rear seats down. (image: Peter Anderson) Boot space starts at a massive 639 litres and expands to 1943 litres with the rear seats down. (image: Peter Anderson)

Does it represent good value for the price? What features does it come with?  7/10

The Vogue TDV6 starts at a fairly hefty $190,000. You might think that's a lot of money for a seven-seat SUV - and you'd be right.

You do alright for your money, though. The list contains 20-inch alloys, climate control, keyless entry and start, a comprehensive safety package, twin-view front screen, dynamic dampers, front and rear parking sensors, cruise control, digital dash, electric heated front seats, auto LED headlights, auto wipers, acoustic heated windscreen, heated rear seats, partial leather seats, head-up display, active air suspension, heated steering wheel, powered gesture-activated tailgate and a full-size spare.

The car I had for the week also had 22-inch gloss black wheels ($5110). (image: Peter Anderson) The car I had for the week also had 22-inch gloss black wheels ($5110). (image: Peter Anderson)

The new 'InControl' system now pairs with an all-new 10-inch touchscreen, and it looks terrific. The system is finally making some inroads (sorry) into the German competitors' in-car multimedia dominance.

Obviously it has sat nav, but it also has DAB, a Wi-Fi hotspot, a TV tuner, app connectivity (iffy, if I'm honest), and various off-road based stuff. The 13-speaker stereo is a belter, but, frustratingly, no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto. JLR keeps saying "watch this space", and after Mazda recently proved me wrong, it's a claim I'll take a little more seriously.

The new 10-inch screen looks a lot more modern than the older version, and it sits atop a redesigned centre console with the new HVAC controls. (image: Peter Anderson) The new 10-inch screen looks a lot more modern than the older version, and it sits atop a redesigned centre console with the new HVAC controls. (image: Peter Anderson)

The car I had for the week also had the 'Pixel Laser' LED lights ($6490), 22-inch gloss black wheels ($5110), sliding panoramic roof ($4420), adaptive cruise ($3600!), black exterior pack ($2730), 'Vision Assist Pack' (foglights, interior ambient lighting and around-view cameras; $2040), Park Pack (rear cross-traffic alert, and side parking sensors; $1280), laminated windows ($830), 'Drive Pack' (blind-spot monitor; $820), wade sensing ($600), ebony headlining ($680), and few extra bits taking us to a grand total of $222,440.

What are the key stats for the engine and transmission?  7/10

Being a Range Rover, it's obviously all-wheel drive with a centre differential for the rough stuff. The TDV6 designation tells us it has a 3.0-litre turbodiesel good for 190kW and 600Nm to shift its substantial frame, weighing in at 2249kg. The dash from 0-100km/h comes up in a surprisingly spritely eight seconds dead, and towing capacity is a muscular 3500kg for a braked trailer.

The eight-speed transmission comes from ZF, and the Vogue even has an incongruous set of paddles for manual changes.

The TDV6 designation tells us it has a 3.0-litre turbodiesel good for 190kW and 600Nm to shift its substantial frame. (image: Peter Anderson) The TDV6 designation tells us it has a 3.0-litre turbodiesel good for 190kW and 600Nm to shift its substantial frame. (image: Peter Anderson)

How much fuel does it consume?  6/10

Land Rover's official combined cycle figure for the Vogue is listed at 6.9L/100km, but in my week with the car doing largely suburban running about, with some highway mixed in, we didn't event get close, returning 12.3L/100km.

Even so, the huge 86-litre tank will ensure you won't have to visit the servo too often.

What's it like to drive?  8/10

A Range Rover drives like no other car. It feels big, but with that upright driving position, it's oddly relaxing. Despite needing a little extra attention to keep the car in the lane, the view out over the flat bonnet is pretty unique.

The air suspension provides a plush ride, but can occasionally get itself into a bit of a heaving-sea movement - as it did along a particular road near where I live. The rest of the time it completely insulates you from the road.

Of course, if I'd had the bravery to tackle some serious off-roading, the air suspension can lift the car from its low-riding city stance to 22cm, meaning you can wade through 90cm of water, which is around half the car's height. The people down the road weren't keen on me testing it in their pool. Spoilsports.

You can't easily escape the fact it's exactly five metres long - it squeezes into parking spaces, and the big mirrors help, too. At least the height is rather more commonplace than it was a decade or so ago, so you're less likely to bang into low ceilings.

Warranty & Safety Rating

Basic Warranty

3 years / 100,000 km warranty

ANCAP Safety Rating

ANCAP logo

What safety equipment is fitted? What safety rating?  8/10

The Vogue sports six airbags, ABS, stability and traction controls, rollover-stability control, hill-descent control, forward-collision warning, forward AEB, corner-braking control and trailer-sway control.

The Rangie scored a five star ANCAP safety rating in 2013.

What does it cost to own? What warranty is offered?  7/10

Range Rover offers a three-year/100,000km warranty with roadside assist for the duration, which is now starting to look a bit skinny. The website assures me that not only does it cover the usual stuff, but you'll also be rescued if you're on four-wheel-drive only tracks, too.

You can cap your service prices with a service plan of up to five years/130,000km, and servicing is required every 12 months or 26,000km.

Pricing Guides

$239,990
Based on 53 cars listed for sale in the last 6 months
Lowest Price
$177,990
Highest Price
$284,944

Range and Specs

VehicleSpecsPrice*
A/B DYNAMIC V8 SC (416KW) 5.0L, PULP, 8 SP AUTO $310,090 – 356,400 2018 RANGE ROVER 2018 A/B DYNAMIC V8 SC (416KW) Pricing and Specs
A/BIOGRAPHY V8 SC LWB 5.0L, PULP, 8 SP AUTO $253,660 – 291,610 2018 RANGE ROVER 2018 A/BIOGRAPHY V8 SC LWB Pricing and Specs
A/BIOGRAPHY V8 SC LWB (386kW) 5.0L, PULP, 8 SP AUTO $253,440 – 291,280 2018 RANGE ROVER 2018 A/BIOGRAPHY V8 SC LWB (386kW) Pricing and Specs
Autobiography SDV8 4.4L, Diesel, 8 SP AUTO $238,888 – 256,000 2018 RANGE ROVER 2018 Autobiography SDV8 Pricing and Specs
EXPERT RATING
7.5
Price and features7
Design8
Practicality9
Engine & trans7
Fuel consumption6
Driving8
Safety8
Ownership7

“The Range Rover is a car everyone knows - it's amazingly capable off-road, actually seats five full-size humans and casts a (huge) stylish shadow like no other. Now well into its sleeker fourth generation, it's ageing well and still holds its position as king of luxury SUVs, despite pretenders piling in from all corners.”

Is the Range Rover still top of the pile? Tell us what you think in the comments.