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Sales to the Maximus: More than 25,000 orders for Jeep Gladiator in less than a month

More than 25,000 orders for Jeep Gladiator in the US.
Andrew Chesterton
Contributing journalist

4 May 2019 • 2 min read

Any fears over how the public would respond to a Wrangler-based pick-up appear to be misguided, with the Jeep Gladiator attracting more than 25,000 US orders in its first month on sale - making it among the most successful Jeep launches ever.

Speaking on a first-quarter earnings phone call with investors, FCA boss Mike Manley described the Gladiator as "one of the quickest" sales booms in his time at Jeep.

"We opened the vehicle for orders, and we now sit - in a very short space of time - on something like 25,000 orders from our dealers," he says. 

"It is probably one of the quickest order ramp-ups that I can remember."

While Australian buyers will have to wait until around the middle of 2020 for the Gladiator to arrive, the US-spec cars will arrive in four trim levels - Sport, Sport S, Overland and Rubicon - and will be available with two engine choices; a 3.6-litre petrol V6 good for 209 kW and 353Nm (paired with an eight-speed automatic or six-speed manual), or a 3.0-litre diesel V6 which will launch in 2020, and will be good for 195kW and 660Nm.

The wheels are 17 inches, and the Gladiator stretches 5539mm in length, 1875mm in width and up to 1907mm in heigh. Towing capacity is listed at "up to" 7650 pounds, or around 3.5 tonnes, and payload capacity at 1600 pounds, or 725 kilograms, with the manual transmission. But that number falls to around 500kg if you opt for an automatic transmission.

Even the cheapest Sport model gets the Command-Trac 4x4 system, with a two-speed transfer case and Dana 44 front and rear axles. But the Rubicon model will prove the hardiest of the lot, with a Rock-Trac 4x4 system with “4LO” and Tru-Lok locking differentials and sway-bar disconnect.

And you should genuinely be able to put the Gladiator to work, too, thanks to a tray that stretches five feet, or 1531mm, in length, and that is equipped with a covered power source and tie-down points.

Look for more Australian-specific details closer to the Gladiator's local launch. 

Will you be in the queue for a Gladiator in Australia? Or are you simple not entertained?