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Hyundai develops "world's first" machine-learning driver assistance

The new Smart Cruise Control system uses AI to accelerate and respond to environments in the same way the driver would.

Hyundai Motor Group says its new driver-assistance feature will allow its cars to autonomously drive in an “identical pattern as that of the driver”.

The updated Smart Cruise Control (SCC-ML) system uses artificial intelligence (AI) to incorporate the driver’s patterns into its self-driving behaviour.

SCC-ML will be implemented in future Hyundai models as part of the brand’s Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS), however, it is unclear exactly when this technology will make it to production.

According to Hyundai Motor Group vice president Woongjun Jang, this technology will improve the practicality of semi-autonomous features, as the brand moves further towards a self-driving future.

According to Hyundai, some people feel anxious using adaptive cruise control as it doesn’t respond the way they would expect. According to Hyundai, some people feel anxious using adaptive cruise control as it doesn’t respond the way they would expect.

“The new SCC-ML improves upon the intelligence of the previous ADAS technology to dramatically improve the practicality of semi-autonomous features,” said Mr Jang.

“Hyundai Motor Group will continue the development efforts on innovative AI technologies to lead the industry in the field of autonomous driving.”

While adaptive cruise control is a common safety feature, which allows a car to maintain a specified distance from the vehicle ahead while travelling at speeds, Hyundai’s proposed system would follow a vehicle ahead based on the driver’s habits.

Using machine-learning technology, the new Smart Cruise Control system is designed to accelerate and respond to driving conditions in the same fashion that the driver would if the system were disabled.

The driving pattern information uses sensors to constantly update, however, it is programmed to avoid learning “unsafe” driving patterns.