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1969 Ford Falcon
See our complete guide for the Ford Falcon

1969 Ford Falcon Pricing and Specs

From
$1,900*

The Ford Falcon 1969 comes in Commercial, Sedan, Ute and Wagon.

The Ford Falcon 1969 is available in Leaded Petrol. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the Sedan 5.8L 3 SP Automatic to the Sedan 3.1L 3 SP Automatic.

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Commercial

Ford Falcon Models SPECS PRICE
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070

Sedan

Ford Falcon Models SPECS PRICE
500 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,100 – 3,630
500 5.0LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,100 – 3,630
500 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,100 – 3,630
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,200 – 3,850
Futura 4.9LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
Futura 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
Futura 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070
GT 5.8LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic
GT 5.8LLeaded Petrol4 speed manual
GTHO Phase I 5.8LLeaded Petrol4 speed manual

Ute

Ford Falcon Models SPECS PRICE
500 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
500 5.0LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
500 5.0LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070
500 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070
(base) 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed manual $2,400 – 4,070

Wagon

Ford Falcon Models SPECS PRICE
500 4.9LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,400 – 4,070
500 3.6LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $2,200 – 3,850
(base) 3.1LLeaded Petrol3 speed automatic $1,900 – 3,300

Ford Falcon 1969 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Ford Falcon here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • What oil can I use instead of Ford Engine Oil?

    You need to keep using an oil that is compatible with LPG as this fuel places different stresses on the lubricating oil compared with an engine burning petrol or diesel. Provided you stick with the correct grade and API rating and choose a known brand (not the Brand-X supermarket stuff) you should be fine. Don’t forget to change the filter every time you change the oil.

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  • What is causing my 2001 Ford AU Falcon ute to miss?

    A miss is fairly common on these engines and is usually tracked back to either a dud spark-plug or a crook ignition lead. If you’ve already changed the plugs, I’d suggest checking the ignition leads for excessive resistance. The other major source of misses in these engines is usually a fault with the coil-packs. Swapping these for another set is a pretty easy way to check whether they’re the culprits. Don’t forget, however, that a miss can also be fuel or mechanical-related, but experience with these engines shows that the ignition system is often the cause.

    According to government websites, the 2001 Falcon six-cylinder can, indeed, use E10 fuel. You may find, however, that you use a little more E10 over 100km than normal unleaded, so the savings at the pump might not be as marked as they seem on paper.

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  • Ford Falcon 2003: Leaking coolant and replacing remote locking

    If you can’t see coolant on the ground where the car has been parked, you need to start a more thorough investigation. Your car is now 17 years old, so every hose, clip, clamp and junction that carries coolant is a prime suspect to be the cause.

    The lack of any evidence could mean that the coolant is only disappearing when the engine is running and/or the engine is hot and the coolant is under pressure. So a close check of things with the car up to temperature and idling is a good start. Don’t forget, though, that a running engine has all sorts of belts and fans to get tangled in, and that the coolant – if it is spraying out anywhere – will be scalding hot.

    The other possibility is something to which Falcons of this era are a bit prone. And that’s a faulty transmission cooler which can fail internally and allow the coolant to escape into the automatic gearbox. At that point, the transmission is usually damaged to the point of needing replacement, so it’s a big deal, but it could explain the mystery disappearance of your coolant.

    As for the central locking, these functions are handled by the car’s body computer. Again, it’s common with this model Falcon for the computer to start playing up and require replacement. But before you do that, check that the battery in the remote unit hasn’t gone flat. If it’s not that, a trip to an auto electrician is the wise move. But if both the body computer and the transmission need replacing, you might just find that the repairs will cost more than the value of the car itself.

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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