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2020 Volvo V90
EXPERT RATING
8.0
/ 10
See our complete guide for the Volvo V90

2020 Volvo V90 Pricing and Specs

From
$80,990*

The Volvo V90 2020 prices range from $80,990 for the basic trim level Wagon V90 D5 Cross Country to $80,990 for the top of the range Wagon V90 D5 Cross Country Inscription.

The Volvo V90 2020 is available in Diesel. Engine sizes and transmissions vary from the Wagon 2.0L 8 SP Automatic to the Wagon 2.0L 8 SP Automatic Geartronic.

When we reviewed the ‘price and features’ of the V90 2020, James Cleary gave it a rating of 8 out of 10. Find out more in the full review here.

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Wagon

Volvo V90 Models SPECS PRICE
D5 Cross Country 2.0LDiesel8 speed automatic $80,990
D5 Cross Country Inscription 2.0LDiesel8 speed automatic $80,990

Volvo V90 2020 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the Volvo here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Are the any issues with the transmission or engine in the 2009 Volvo XC90 diesel?

    There are many variables that can determine how reliable or or otherwise a vehicle can be, especially one that's 11-years-old. A full Volvo dealer-stamped service history, careful owners and pure luck all play a role here, and should be a prerequisite. 

    Research shows that the XC90's D5 diesel engine's injectors have been known to fail, and this can be an expensive fix. This may or not be associated with power-loss issues.

    Blown turbos, electrical faults and overheating problems have also been reported multiple times.

    Some earlier XC90s have been known to suffer from complete transmission failure, reportedly preceded by "strange" noises before bringing the car to a total stop. It seems regular full transmission servicing really reduces the instances of this happening, so again, insist on a fully-stamped service book from authorised Volvo dealers or specialists. 

    While not strictly speaking mechanical, the Volvo's sunroof can leak, and this can become very costly to rectify. Neglecting this problem can then lead to electrical failures and water ingress damage inside the cabin.

    Our research shows the XC90 D5 of your vintage is no more likely to break down than most European rival luxury SUVs of the same period, which is reasonably good news, though Japanese alternatives do perform better generally.

    We hope this helps.

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  • Volvo XC60 2019: Why do I already need new brakes?

    This is a pretty common complaint from owners of a lot of European makes and models. To maximise braking performance, a lot of manufacturers (including Volvo) use a relatively hard brake pad and a relatively soft brake rotor. With the result that by the time the brake pads are worn enough to be replaced, so too are the rotors (discs).

    However, the general expectation is that a vehicle should be capable of covering about 60,000km before this work needs to be done, so the 30,000km on your car suggests the brakes work harder than perhaps you think they do.

    As for the price, I’d assume that to be using genuine Volvo parts. Shopping around and using aftermarket replacement parts could almost halve that quote.

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  • What electric car should I buy?

    We can understand your feelings about the centrally-mounted screen in the Tesla, though you do get used to it surprisingly quickly.

    As for the other models you’ve mentioned, we’ve had to get the crystal ball out to attempt to answer you!

    The Polestar 2 will be on sale by the end of 2020, if all goes to plan. The company will be pushing hard to make that happen. 

    The VW ID3 is likely not going to be here until 2021, likely the mid or latter part of that year. It certainly has a lot of potential, and with pricing set to start below $50,000, it could well be The People’s (Electric) Car. 

    There are other options coming, though it depends on your diary and your budget.

    You could consider the Tesla Model S, which may have been around for a while, but that also means it has a more traceable reliability history. It has a digital instrument cluster in the regular spot as well.

    Have you looked at the Jaguar i-Pace? It has a claimed range of 470 kilometres, though it is on the pricey side of the equation, starting from about $125,000.

    Indeed, a high price tag is a common theme among those EVs with big battery capacity and expansive driving range, because you’re basically covering the cost of the batteries with your money.

    For instance, there’s the Audi e-tron quattro, which is due here in early 2020. That model will have a range of “more than 400 kilometres”, and - we suspect - a price tag above $120,000. 

    The Mercedes EQC is about to go on sale, too. Range for that mid-size SUV is pegged at about 450 kilometres, but again, you can expect a high price tag.

    If 2021 isn’t too long to wait, there’s the Volvo XC40 Recharge coming then. Based on our previous experience with Volvo XC40s, it’ll be a great small SUV, with predicted range of 400km - though we think that’s understating it, because it has a 78kWh battery pack, and it has AWD too.

    At the more affordable end - though admittedly still not quite meeting your expectations for range - there’s the very impressive Hyundai Kona Electric, which has a WLTP range of 449km, and a price tag of around $65k. It isn’t all-wheel drive though.

    And MG is about to launch a real upstart in the segment, with the ZS EV hitting showrooms soon for $46,990 drive-away, albeit with a range of 262km. It’s also FWD only. 

    The Mini Cooper SE will also arrive in mid-2020, with pricing set to be less than $60k. But again, a range of 270km will likely rule it out for your needs, and its 2WD as well.

    Another new small EV due next year is the Mazda MX-30. Pricing is still to be confirmed, and range isn’t great at about 300km. It’s FWD too. 

    In short, at this point in time - and out towards the end of 2020 - it looks like you’ll either need to spend a big amount of money on a premium EV to get the best range possible, or you’ll have to get used to the Model 3’s screen. You could always get an aftermarket head-up display fitted…

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Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

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