Browse over 9,000 car reviews

2016 BMW 6 Series
EXPERT RATING
8.0
/ 10
See our complete guide for the BMW 6 Series

2016 BMW 6 Series Pricing and Specs

From
$60,000*

The BMW 6 Series 2016 prices range from $60,000 for the basic trim level Sedan 6 Series 640i Gran Coupe to $136,070 for the top of the range Convertible 6 Series 640i IND Collection.

The BMW 6 Series 2016 comes in Convertible, Coupe and Sedan.

The BMW 6 Series 2016 is available in Premium Unleaded Petrol and Diesel.

Read more

Filter by:

Convertible

BMW 6 Series Models SPECS PRICE
640i 3.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $77,800 – 98,340
640i IND Collection 3.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $107,600 – 136,070
650i 4.4LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $99,400 – 125,730

Coupe

BMW 6 Series Models SPECS PRICE
640i 3.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $71,300 – 90,200
640i IND Collection 3.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $100,200 – 126,720
650i 4.4LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $93,000 – 117,590

Sedan

BMW 6 Series Models SPECS PRICE
640d Gran Coupe 3.0LDiesel8 speed automatic $64,600 – 81,730
640i Gran Coupe 3.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $64,600 – 81,620
640i IND Collection Gran Coupe 3.0LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $80,100 – 101,310
650i Gran Coupe 4.4LPremium Unleaded Petrol8 speed automatic $95,900 – 121,220

BMW 6 Series 2016 FAQs

Check out real-world situations relating to the BMW here, particularly what our experts have to say about them.

  • Genesis G90 - Any chance for Australia?

    Both the existing Genesis G90 (and its closely related Kia K9 sedan) are flagship models not available in Australia due to the tiny pool of buyers that swim in the upper-luxury segment dominated by the Mercedes-Benz S-Class.

    The main stumbling block is probably the prohibitive cost of engineering these left-hand-drive market models for right-hand-drive. At over 5.2 metres long (and counting if you include the limo version), these are way too large for British roads, and the expected sales volumes from the rest of the right-hand-drive countries combined including Australia just doesn't make a viable business case for them.

    Plus, big luxury SUVs are where the customers are heading, so a luxury crossover flagship from fledgling Genesis would make much more sense anyway. Sorry, but please don't hold your breath for a G90 in Australia any time soon.

    However, the all-electric G80 – Genesis' big 5 Series-priced rival – is said to be heading Downunder inside the next 12 months. The EV limo is the brand’s first fully electric model and will have “more than 500km range” to take on the coming Mercedes-Benz EQS electric luxury flagship sedan.

    Show more
  • BMW X8 - Will BMW build an SUV bigger than the X7?

    With the Germans in particular hungry to mine every single niche – fanned by the flames of electrification and a hunger by the ever-growing number of global billionaires for the biggest and best – an 'uber, uber SUV' above the X7 will probably happen.

    BMW is saying nothing of course, and we're only speculating here, but if it ever happens, it would almost certainly be electric or electrified, and may spawn a Rolls-Royce offshoot, since BMW owns that English brand.

    So, nothing for now, but don't bet against an X8 or even X9. They're likely inevitable given enough time.

    Show more
  • Should I buy an electric car now or later?

    It’s definitely true that the march of new-car technology is making big changes to the cars we’re being offered almost on a monthly basis. So, if your current car is just three years old, it might be worth holding on to it and waiting for the next big thing to arrive in showrooms. Certainly, by trading-in at just three years, you’ll pretty much max out the depreciation you’ll suffer in financial terms.

    But by waiting, you might find that you can buy an electric vehicle and be able to tap into newer and better infrastructure that will be in place in another few years, rather than put up with the relatively sparse charging-station network currently in this country.

    At the moment, a hybrid or plug-in hybrid is a pretty good way to go, provided you use the vehicle mostly in an urban setting, rather than long-distance freeway journeys where the hybrid tech is less advantageous. A hybrid is not exactly future-proof, but it’s a good next step for a lot of Australian car-owners.

     

    As for what brand is best, the tech is getting better and better as time goes by, so it’s likely to be build date rather than brand that will determine the efficiency of the vehicle in question. That said, car owners can’t hold off forever when it comes to upgrading, so for the moment, a hybrid or plug-in hybrid is a logical next car. We’re particularly impressed by the current-model Toyota Camry which is good value to buy, a classy driving experience and offers hybrid fuel efficiency in the right environment. Such cars will be a lot of Australian families’ first hybrid, and rightly so.

    Show more
See All BMW FAQs
Disclaimer: You acknowledge and agree that all answers are provided as a general guide only and should not be relied upon as bespoke advice. Carsguide is not liable for the accuracy of any information provided in the answers.

Search pricing & specs

Search

Interested in a BMW 6 Series?
Insurance Quote Get a Finance Quote