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1 October 2019

Targa Tasmania to go electric in 2021

By Joel StricklandJoel Strickland
  • Being a Porsche you know the Taycan's going to have good handling, so this could be a real winner on the stages. (image: supplied by manufacturer) Being a Porsche you know the Taycan's going to have good handling, so this could be a real winner on the stages. (image: supplied by manufacturer)
  • The new Tesla Roadster which is due to be released next year claims to have a range of around 900km. (image: supplied by manufacturer) The new Tesla Roadster which is due to be released next year claims to have a range of around 900km. (image: supplied by manufacturer)
  • The BMW i3, was the brands entry point to the electric car market, with a 200km range it may not be really suitable for a long day of Targa stages. (image: supplied by manufacturer) The BMW i3, was the brands entry point to the electric car market, with a 200km range it may not be really suitable for a long day of Targa stages. (image: supplied by manufacturer)
  • Nissan's Leaf has just been updated and now features a 300km range, still probably not quite enough to handle a day of stages. (image: supplied by manufacturer) Nissan's Leaf has just been updated and now features a 300km range, still probably not quite enough to handle a day of stages. (image: supplied by manufacturer)
  • With a range of just under 600km, it makes sense that we might see the Model S hit the roads. (image: supplied by manufacturer) With a range of just under 600km, it makes sense that we might see the Model S hit the roads. (image: supplied by manufacturer)
  • One of the interesting parts of running an electric class will be how to support the charging of the cars overnight. (image: supplied by manufacturer) One of the interesting parts of running an electric class will be how to support the charging of the cars overnight. (image: supplied by manufacturer)

Targa Tasmania has announced plans to add an electric category to its tarmac rally series from 2021.

A statement released by the event, went on to say that the event they already have manufacturers committed to be involved, which is very exciting to hear.

The requirements for the class are here:

This competition is reserved for ELECTRIC ONLY vehicles manufactured from 1st January 2010 up to the first day of competition(Category9). Vehicles must be (or have been) commercially available in any number as a road registerable vehicle when manufactured or be a vehicle approved by Targa Australia. All vehicles will use the same base time to determine the winners.

Full technical regulations will be released in 2020 for the class.

So with this announcement let's take a look at some of the potential candidates for this class.

The BMW i3, was the brands entry point to the electric car market, with a 200km range it may not be really suitable for a long day of Targa stages, So we are unlikely to see an i3 hit the stages.

Nissan's Leaf has just been updated and now features a 300km range, still probably not quite enough to handle a day of stages.

The original Tesla Roadster Sport 2.5, which was based on a Lotus Elise, has a range of just under 400km, so should have enough range to cover a day of racing. Given production ended in 2012, it's seven years early for the cutoff date though.

The Tesla Model S is currently attempting to beat the lap record at the Ring, with a range of just under 600km, it make sense that we might see one hit the roads.

The new Tesla Roadster which is due to be released next year claims to have a range of around 900km. Which should get you through a day of stages before recharging. But no word as yet on it coming to Australia.

Now to the Porsche Taycan, the latest electric sports car to be announced. The Taycan comes in two specs called Turbo, the range for both of them is between 400 and 450km. Being a Porsche you know it's going to have good handling, so this could be a real winner on the stages.

One of the interesting parts of running an electric class will be how to support the charging of the cars overnight. Currently there are Tesla destination chargers and Chargefox charging stations scattered throughout the state. But there are a few towns that are currently missing any charge infrastructure so it will be interesting to see what happens there.

Do you think electric tarmac cars will be hit? What car would you take to Targa Tasmania if you had the choice ? Tell us in the comments below.

Joel Strickland loves all things automotive, you can follow him via @joelstrickphoto on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.